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Hit-Or-Miss Tastemade/Snapchat

This Disease Gets You Drunk Off Carbs

 

auto-brewery-syndrome

Before you indulge the thought of reveling in a perpetually drunken state, realize that Auto-Brewery Syndrome is a very curious, very serious condition.

What happens is that it essentially gets you drunk off food—carbohydrates specifically. The body digests carbs similarly to a brewery processing beer, which leads to a problematic everyday life, as was the most recent case with a New York woman pulled over for a DUI or the more notable case of Nick Hess, whose wife was (at first) adamant that he was an alcoholic.

Those with the condition can function with an alcohol level of .30 or .40 while your average person would otherwise be comatose or on practically death’s door. The condition’s side effects range from random hangovers to more severe outcomes, such as irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and depression. It’s a mystifying, troubling condition.

What happens?

Also known as gut fermentation syndrome, auto-brewery syndrome is an extremely rare condition that intoxicates the individual whenever they digest carbohydrates. Caused by an overgrowth of yeast, the stomach transforms any carbs into wildly high levels of ethanol through endogenous fermentation.

What is the history?

The condition, or at least the symptoms of it, date back to the 1970s, when doctors in Japan were treating individuals with chronic yeast infections. The curious issue here is that those in the United States these days lack the abnormal liver enzyme of the notable Japanese cases. These current individuals have gut levels of yeast way, way beyond the average range, especially one strain called Saccharomyces cerevisiae, though it’s more commonly known as “brewer’s yeast.”

What is the treatment?

To address the body’s ability to get drunk on carby food, antifungal drugs—specifically one called fluconazoleand a low carbohydrate diet is the best-known ongoing remedy. However, due to the condition’s lack of prevalence in the world (an estimated 100 cases or less), it’s a challenge to treat the problem with a standardized approach.

While the condition’s rarity has made it a challenge to deal with, its more prevalent mentions in news articles and science journals these last few years have helped those diagnosed with auto-brewery syndrome have hope. These latest revelations on the disease are what got the DUI case thrown out and what made Hess’s wife a champion advocate in the end.

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Video

How to Identify 16 of America’s Most Essential Donuts [VIDEO]

Donut Cover

You’re standing in line at your local donut shop deciding what to order. No one wants to be that customer who doesn’t know the difference between a cruller and a fritter. Rather than take a stab at your donut of preference, you just play it safe and order a plain, halfheartedly eating it on the morning commute.

In honor of National Doughnut Day, Foodbeast put together a video of some of the most common donuts you’ll find in shops and what they’re called. We know your morning minutes are precious, so we definitely don’t want you wasting them on donut confusion. Sit back and enjoy some intimate shots of donut porn. Hopefully not on an empty stomach:

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Cake Donut

IMG_9724

SHAPE: Round, ring donut

NOTES: Dense, Muffin-type donuts called “Sinkers”.

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Crullers

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SHAPE: Twisted, ridged surface

NOTES: Pronounced “Kruhl-er”. It’s name is derived from Dutch Krullen, or “to curl”.

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Fritters

IMG_9767

SHAPE: Lumpy, circular.

NOTES: Pan-fried cakes made with cornmeal

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Long John

IMG_9773

SHAPE: Long, bar-shaped

NOTES: Filled long johns are sold as “éclairs”.

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Bear Claw

IMG_9780

SHAPE: Rectangular with slices along one side to resemble a bear’s toes.

NOTES: While the bear claw is sometimes considered a donut, it’s common for bear claws to be almond-flavored pastries more similar to fritters in texture.

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Cake Sprinkle

IMG_9792

SHAPE: Round, ring donut

TASTE: Glazed donuts covered in confectionery sprinkles.

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Glazed

IMG_9809

SHAPE: Round, ring donut.

NOTES: Made with sugar, vanilla, salt, cold milk and water.

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Boston Cream

IMG_9819

SHAPE: Round, filled. A mini version of the Boston cream pie.

NOTES: Called a “Boston Cream” when frosted in chocolate, but called a “Bavarian Creme” when dusted with powdered sugar.

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Maple Bar

IMG_9825

SHAPE: Long, bar-shaped.

NOTES: Coated with a maple glaze. Goes great with bacon!

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Twist

IMG_9837

SHAPE: Two pieces of dough twisted together.

NOTES: Twists must be made in opposite directions for optimal texture and tension.

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Roll

IMG_9847

SHAPE: Spiral, circular.

NOTES: Rolled in a cinnamon and sugar mix.

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Chocolate Glaze

IMG_9858

SHAPE: Round, ring donut

NOTES: Glazed donut made with corn syrup, bittersweet chocolate and confectioner’s sugar.

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Cinnamon Crumb

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SHAPE: Round, ring donut

NOTES: One of the most underrated donuts. Covered in crunchy, cinnamon-sugar crumbs. Fantastic dipped in coffee.

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Powdered Sugar

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SHAPE: Round, filled

NOTES: Donuts covered in confectioner’s sugar or “snow sugar” that doesn’t melt.

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Raspberry Filled

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SHAPE: Round, filled

NOTES: Filled with raspberry jelly.

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Donut Holes

Donut Holes FB

SHAPE: Round balls, the center of ring donuts.

NOTES: Called “Timbits” in Canada

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Features

12 Human Foods You Didn’t Know Could Kill Your Dog

Chocolate Heading

The most important thing with pet care is knowing what you can and can’t feed your dog. That and capitalizing on your puppy for hilarious memes. As long as you stick to a pretty decent doggy diet, everything should be gravy right? Wrong. Turns out there’s a ton of foods you probably didn’t know about that can actually be really bad for your dog, including some that are perfectly healthy for humans.

After all, there’s nothing worse than having your dog suffer over a simple mistake in diet. While they’re still man’s best friend, they probably shouldn’t eat like your best friend. Because we at Foodbeast care about you and your canine companions, here are 12 human foods that your dog should most definitely avoid.

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Chocolate

Chocolate

Chocolate is one of the most common foods that is bad for dogs, so we figured we’d knock it off the list early. Dog owners know better than to leave a Toblerone or two laying around.

What’s In It:

Chocolate contains caffeine and theobromine which fall under the methylxanthines category. When we hear the phrase “the darker the chocolate, the more dangerous,” it’s because white chocolates contain fewer methylxanthines. Thus, less toxicity.

What It Can Do:

If eaten by a dog, chocolate can cause vomiting, dehydration, abdominal pains, severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, elevated body temperature, seizures and death.

H/T ASPCA

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Milk

cereal-tea-milk

Yeah we know, puppies drink milk from their mothers after they’re born. However, like humans  (including moi), dogs can also suffer from lactose intolerance.

What’s In It:

Milk contains milk sugar that dogs don’t have the enzymes to break down.

What It Can Do:

Consumption of milk could lead to vomiting, diarrhea and other gastrointestinal problems. While it’s not immediately life-threatening, it can contribute to serious bacterial exposure in dogs that could eventually lead to disease.

H/T Can I Give My Dog

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Cheese

Nachos

Sorry boy, no Grilled Cheese Spot for you. Your stomach will thank me for it later.

What’s In It:

Like milk, cheese also has sugars and fatty components that dogs don’t have the necessary enzymes to break down.

What It Can Do:

Cheese, and other dairy products, can cause problems if consumed in excess. Symptoms like gas, diarrhea and vomiting can all occur if a dog eats too much cheese.

H/T Dog Food Advisor

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Onion

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

While onions go with pretty much anything savory, they can do more than just make your dog cry.

What’s In It:

Onions contain compounds that can be harmful to dogs if ingested enough.

What It Can Do:

Onions can damage red blood cells in dogs causing them to become weaker and move around less. If enough onions are consumed, a blood transfusion might be necessary.

H/T No Longer Wild

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Macadamia Nuts

Macadamias

One of the more recent discoveries, Macadamia Nuts can be incredibly harmful to dogs if eaten.

What’s In It:

The specific chemicals found in macadamias are still unknown right now, but they are known to cause a toxic reaction to dogs if ingested.

What It Can Do:

Dogs will develop weakness and an inability to walk, specifically in their hind legs. Vomiting, staggering gait, depression, tremors and hypothermia.

H/T VetMedicine

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Garlic

Garlic

Consider your dogs vampires and keep them away from raw garlic as much as possible.

What’s In It:

Like the chocolate rule, the stronger the onion the more toxic it can be. Since garlic is part of the onion family it’s even more dangerous to dogs than onions per ounce. Garlic contains compounds that are strong in toxicity.

What It Can Do:

While the effect of garlic consumption to red blood cells won’t appear for a few days in dogs, they’ll be tired and reluctant to move. The dog’s urine will be orange to dark red in color. Like with onions, a blood transfusion might be required in severe cases.

H/T ASPCA

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Grapes

Grapes

Like Macadamia Nuts, grapes and raisins can be extremely toxic to dogs.

What’s In It:

While its currently unknown what chemicals and compounds are in grapes that cause toxicity to dogs, the results of consumption can be pretty devastating.

What It Can Do:

Grapes and raisins can cause rapid kidney failure. While it varies between dogs, symptoms may not show up in them. Other than kidney failure, dogs can also develop vomiting or diarrhea as well as a lethargic state. Dogs will also develop dehydration and lack of appetite. Death from kidney failure may occur within three to four days.

H/T ASPCA

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Avocados

Slices of Avocado

You might want to hold off sharing that guac with your doggy pal. He’ll thank you for it later.

What’s In It:

Avocado leaves, pits, bark and fruit contain a toxin called persin.

What It Can Do:

Avocados can have toxic effects on dogs depending on the variety. They can cause upset stomachs in dogs, breathing difficulties, fluid buildup in the chest, but the most dangerous thing for them seem to the be the pit. Since it’s slippery, the pit can accidentally be swallowed by dogs, leading to obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract.

H/T HubPages

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Apple Cores

IMG_9100

While most people try to avoid eating the core of an apple, it’s actually much more toxic to dogs. Along with a few other fruits, you should definitely be careful not to leave apple cores laying around for dogs to get their paws on.

What’s In It:

The core of an apple (as well as plums, peaches, pears and apricots) contain cyanogenic glycosides which is also known as cyanide.

What It Can Do:

Some of the symptoms that come from ingesting the toxin are dizziness, struggling to breath, seizures, collapsing, hyperventilation, shock and even coma.

H/T HubPages

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Yeast Dough

Bread

Bread makes you fat? While having a chubby puppy isn’t the worst thing in the world, yeast dough used to make bread should absolutely be kept away from dogs.

What’s In It:

The raw yeast dough from making bread can ferment in a dog’s stomach, becoming toxic.

What It Can Do:

Aside from the toxicity from alcohol being produced in the stomach, yeast dough can also expand in your dog’s stomach or intestines and create a large amount of gas in the digestive system. This can lead to severe pain and a potentially ruptured stomach or intestinal tract. Vomiting, abdominal discomfort and lethargy can also occur.

H/T VetMedicine

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Caffeine

IMG_8783RS

No idea who would ever share coffee with a dog. I mean, what do they have to do all day other than sleep and look out the window?  In all seriousness, owners should never let their dogs near coffee or any form of caffeine.

What’s In It:

Coffee contains a stimulant known as Methylated xanthine.

What It Can Do:

Methylated xanthine stimulates the nervous system in dogs, causing vomiting, restlessness, heart palpitations and even death.

H/T Can I Give My Dog

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Bacon

bacon

What? Bacon?! Say it isn’t so! It’s absolutely tragic that we can’t share one of the greatest foods out there with our canine buddies. We’ll need to remember this the next time we want to feed our dogs some breakfast bacon under the table. Well, more bacon for us then. Sorry, buddy.

What’s In It:

Foods rich in fat, like bacon, can lead to the disease pancreatitis in dogs. Once a dog has developed pancreatitis, their pancreas’ become inflamed and stop functioning correctly.

What It Can Do:

This leads to all sorts of problems with digestion and nutrient absorption.

H/T Can I Give My Dog

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It should also be noted that the amount of damage these foods can do vary on the specific breeds and sizes of your dogs. Like humans, all dogs are different and can react differently to foods. Though it’s better to keep them away from these foods just for good measure.

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Hit-Or-Miss

This Substance Lets You Drink a Whole Keg Without Getting Drunk

yeast

Jim Koch is one of the big guys behind Sam Adams beer, and he’s letting us in on a little secret that could revolutionize drinking. Koch claims there’s a way to drink more and not get drunk — by eating yeast.

His master brewer friend Joseph Owades shared this genius tip with him — something we all could’ve used years ago. Apparently, ingesting one teaspoon of yeast (before drinking) for every beer will force alcohol to start breaking down in your stomach, reducing the effects of alcohol, as Esquire explains:

Active dry yeast has an enzyme in it called alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH). Roughly put, ADH is able to break alcohol molecules down into their constituent parts of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Which is the same thing that happens when your body metabolizes alcohol in its liver. Owades realized if you also have that enzyme in your stomach when the alcohol first hits it, the ADH will begin breaking it down before it gets into your bloodstream and, thus, your brain.

Eating yeast probably isn’t the most enjoyable experience, but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do. The beauty of science, folks.

If you’ve ever tried this and can attest to/disprove the magical powers of yeast, let us know in the comments below!

H/T Sploid + Picthx Wiki

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Hit-Or-Miss

Auto-Brewery Syndrome: The Ability to Brew Beer in Your Gut

auto-brewery-syndrome

This guy’s beer belly will beat yours any day. In 2013, Dr. Justin McCarthy, a gastroenterologist, and Barbara Cordell, dean of nursing at Panola College, featured a paper in the International Journal of Clinical Medicine, detailing a strange case. A 61-year-old man went to the emergency room complaining of dizziness. After several tests, the nurses determined the man was drunk. Five times more than the legal limit drunk. Except the man hadn’t had any alcohol that day.

What was causing his phantom intoxication? Turns out, it was an overbalance of brewer’s yeast in his gut. His own intestines had been functioning as an internal brewery, essentially making and digesting beer in his belly. Whenever he ate starch, the yeast fermented the sugar into ethanol, making him drunk. The issue has since been dubbed “auto-brewery syndrome.”

If you’re worried about your sandwiches and chips, don’t be. Most of the time, brewer’s yeast just passes through our systems like any other food. It’s only rare cases that the yeast may take up residency in the guy and cause problems. And while we imagine it must be embarrassing at times to get drunk without drinking, it could be a pretty neat party trick.

H/T NPR + Picthx Lindsey G

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Hit-Or-Miss

This Beer Has Human Beard Hair in it, On Purpose

From a brewing company whose flavor folio includes “Good Chit Pilsner” and “OREgasmic Ale,” a beer made with yeast pulled from nine strands of human beard hair probably shouldn’t be too surprising — but it is a little gross.

The hairs in question belong to a one John Maier, brew master of Rogue Ales in Newport, Ore., which – in search of its next signature yeast – decided “for fun” to toss the strands of Maier’s 34 year old beard into a culture plate, and found the resulting yeast produced a beer whose aroma was “mild” and “fruity” and “lacked any harsh, medicinal flavors that sometimes result from using wild yeast.” Never mind the teensy-weensy molecules of dead human skin.

According to yeast ecologist Kyria Boundy-Mills, the surprising yeast probably got deposited on the 57 year old Maier’s beard sometime during his 20 years of brewing experience – possibly even being a hybrid of Rogue’s own house yeast (called “Pacman” yeast) and a wild strain.

The result? A beer with a spicy flavor profile which Rogue president Brett Joyce says they don’t want to mask, and in fact, intend to make into a new beer for next spring: the New Crustacean, the more hirsute companion to the brand’s existing Old Crustacean Barleywine.

I don’t know about you, but I foresee this being a pretty hard one to sell at parties. “Oh don’t worry, it doesn’t have any actual human beard in it. No, no just beard yeast.”

I think I’ll keep my Rocky Mountain Oyster Stout, thanks.

H/T: The Scientist, Tim Bulone

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Hit-Or-Miss

Bear Republic, Fat Head’s and Stone TBA Collaboration Homebrew

Stone Brewing Co. was founded in 1996, and since then has been voted the “All-time Top Brewery on Planet Earth” and will soon become the first American brewery to have a European brewhouse location.

As part of the brand’s success and growth, they have the ability to do special edition beers on demand. In 2008, Stone released a new series of collaboration beers. The goal was to get three brewers from three different breweries to create a beer with no boundaries.

Along the same vein, we introduce their first collaborative project of 2012, with Bear Republic and Fat Head’s, a tribute to a lost style of brewing; TBA. The acronym alludes to a classic but little-known beer style called Texas Brown Ale, which, actually comes from California.

In the 80s, there was a homebrew recipe for a hoppy brown ale, made with Cascade hops, hopping (word play?) around northern California. Even as it gained some popularity, it didn’t do well in homebrew competitions since it didn’t fall under any recognized category. It was way too hoppy and bitter to be considered a traditional brown ale. But eventually it caught on, and a competition in Houston, TX decided to judge these entires in a ‘California Dark’ category. The American Homebrewers Association soon allowed these entires in their own competitions, and changed the category name to Texas Brown Ale.

This TBA is yet another interesting creation from the Stone team out of Escondido, CA. TBA pours a beautiful auburn brown with a light tan head. The initial smell is a bit piney, but becomes sweeter probably due to the molasses introduced by Richard Norgrove from Bear Republic. The taste begins with a strong blast of malt flavors, followed by some fruity flavors mixed with the brown sugar also introduced by Richard. And finally finishes with an intense hoppy bitterness, that lightly lingers in your mouth.

I had a chance to try this a few days back, it’s super easy to drink and incredibly refreshing. If you like brown ales or IPAs of any sort, you will absolutely love this beer.