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Alcohol Drinks What's New

Grey Poupon Debuts First-Ever White Wine Infused With Mustard Seeds

I remember as a kid watching Grey Poupon mustard commercials specifically for their bougie-ness. The pinky up energy was always strong with Grey Poupon, even if it was just mustard. Not mad at it, they stay in their lane and do it immaculately.

Continuing their fancy consistency, Grey Poupon is now jumping into the wine scene with La Moutarde Vin, the first-ever white wine infused with Grey Poupon mustard seeds. It’s definitely within their scope to take on this new segment, especially since the brand’s first foray into wine and spirits particularly celebrates the white wine used to create Grey Poupon’s classic Dijon recipe.

Looking to up the pinky up quotient for your next feast? Head to GreyPouponWine.com to purchase a bottle now.

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Why Pairing Seafood & Sake Is A Sensory Gamechanger

For most of human history, we had no way of identifying what made certain dishes so delicious. We could describe sour, sweet, bitter, and salty sensations, but not savory. That is, until 1908, when Kikunae Ikeda discovered the fifth taste — umami. Umami is the essence of savory, giving life to some of the world’s most delectable ingredients like meat, soy sauce, and fish paste.

That same year, Ikeda identified the molecular happenings that take our taste buds on this journey. In short, he found that an amino acid called glutamate is largely responsible. Scientists have since expanded on Ikeda’s findings, saying there are nucleotides found in many foods that, when combined with amino acids, intensify the umami experience. It’s this interaction that gives alcohol and meat pairings so much depth, as the amino acids in alcohol pair exceptionally well with the nucleotides found in all meat.

This is especially true in the case of sake, which holds significantly more amino acids than most beers or wine, making it one of the purest tastes of umami that we have on Earth. Because of this, it outshines other alcohols in being paired with umami rich dishes, such as seafood, where most would think to drink something like a glass of white wine.

Sometimes, though, it’s best to drop the fancy talk and put things in layman’s terms. In Foodbeast’s new video regarding the drink, sake expert Chris Johnson says it best. Sake and seafood work, on a basic level, because “the seafood elevates the sake, the sake elevates the seafood, and you have a party.”

The video acts as a crash course in sake, as Foodbeast correspondent George Laboda travels to Rappahannock Oyster Bar in Los Angeles, CA to try nine different seafood and sake pairings. But first, he gets hit with the basics.

There are three overarching types of sake: Junmai, Ginjo, and Daiginjo, each carrying a different percentage of milling, a process that consists of polishing down the rice used to brew sake. The more it’s milled, the more the grain turns into a pure starch, producing a layered, textured brew. This does not, however, mean that as the milling percentage goes up, so does the quality. On the contrary, milling says quite little about quality, and more about the flavor of the sake and what food it might work well with.

The video works to show this by presenting nine different pairings by highlighting a variety of sake along the way — from a hazy, unfiltered desert sake to an unusually amber tinted sake — and their wide-ranging effects on our palate. Check out all the pairings below:

Course #1: Raw Oysters & Konishi Aosae no Sumikiri Junmai


Old Salt oysters topped with a kimchi vignette met a sharp Junmai that relaxed the brininess of the raw oysters.

Course #2: Grilled Oysters & Nanbu Bijin Shinpaku Junmai Daiginjo

The next course showed the textural application of sake by pairing a grilled oyster with a light, fruity Daiginjo whose velvety mouthfeel accentuated the kimchi butter that the oyster was slathered in.

Course #3: Crispy Oysters & Suzaku

A smooth Ginjo was used to cut the fattiness of raw oysters and make their sweetness pop.

Course #4: Hamachi & Nanbu Bijin Daiginjo

This Daiginjo pairs especially well with raw fish, as the dryness worked in cohesion with the lusciousness of the raw Hamachi.

Course #5: Smoked Trout Deviled Eggs & Shirayuki Junmai Daiginjo Daihouju

Playing off of spicy and sweet, these smoky deviled eggs were paired with a heavily aromatic Daiginjo with fruity undertones.

Course #6: Peruvian Bay Scallops & Horin

The sixth course featured another Daiginjo, but this time a microbrew that skipped the fruitiness and focused on a texture and mouthfeel that complimented the creamy scallops.

Course #7: Shrimp & Grits with Gochujang Sauce & Nigori

Nigori, a special type of unfiltered sake that produces a textured, thick mouthfeel, was paired with a spin off of a Southern classic to play with the gritty texture and spice of the dish.

Course #8: Grilled Octopus & Shirayuki Sake of Edo-Genroku Era “Year1702”

Made using half the amount of water as a normal brew, the Year1702 is amber-colored and naturally sweet, which provides for a phenomenal pairing with sweeter seafood dishes, like the Spanish-style octopus from the video.

Course #9: Lobster Roll & Nanbu Bijin Tokubetsu Junmai

The final course coupled a lobster roll with a simple, clean-tasting Junmai to break up the intensity of the sauce that the lobster was tossed in.


Created in partnership with JFOODO. 

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Alcohol Culture Drinks News Nightlife Toasty

This Wine 101 Series of Charts Will Have You Looking Like An Expert [INFOGRAPHIC]

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner or you may have gotten a great bottle as a gift recently. Either way, it’s probably time to hone up on your wine skills. Thankfully, the good folks at Ship It Appliances have got you covered. These handy infographics will outline which food matches with which wine, which glass to use, and will even state why you should have your reds in a fridge.

Choosing the right wine is easier if you’re pairing it with food. Very dry white wines match well with fish and white meat as do rose wines. Sweet white wines and dessert wines match with many cheeses and dessert. A light red wine should be matched with cheese or white meat, while full-bodied reds should generally be paired with red meats.

As for glasses, most people aren’t that picky, but you want to serve wine properly. Reds should be served in a glass with a large bowl so the aromas can be released, while whites, a glass with a smaller bowl, to trap the aromas.

So, how should you hold a wine glass? You don’t want your white to get too warm or vice versa. The best way to hold a wine glass is by the stem. If you hold it by the bowl, your hand will warm the wine.

Wine, like good whiskey, shouldn’t be filled to the brim. White wines should be poured halfway, a glass of sparkling wine should be three quarters full, and a glass of red wine, just a third full.

As a general rule, white wines are served chilled and red wines at room temperature. For sweet and sparkling wines, you should be served much cooler than full-bodied whites. The idea that red wines should be served at room temperature came about before central heating, so that the average home was likely much cooler then than it is today. If you want to ensure your wines are always served at the ideal temperature, it’s well worth investing in a wine cooler.

Finally, both red and white wines vary in sweetness, from the bone dry to the super sweet. Here’s a chart to determine the sweetness of wine.

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Alcohol Design Drinks News Toasty

Boxxle Gives Boxed Wine a Classy Makeover

If you’ve ever made fun of boxed wine — while you’re not alone — shame on you! Did you know that boxed wine stays fresh up to six weeks? Or that its more environmentally conscious than bottled wine? Or you will never have to fear cork taint (yes, its a thing)? Well, now with Boxxle, a premium bag-in-box wine dispenser, you can drink your boxed wine with pride.

Boxxle recently released its 3-liter premium wine dispenser in two new colors: white (blanc) and red (rouge) with stainless steel accents. The new colors join the original black in its three-color lineup. Boxxle gives wine lovers a new way to dispense and enjoy boxed wine — elevating it above the rim of the glass for easy pouring. The dispenser, which compresses the bag and keeps air out, is designed to rest on a countertop, bar or table.


And Boxxle, which retails for $99, isn’t just for bottled wine. For those who are still into bottled wine, it also ships with three 3-liter wine preserve bags, which store up to four bottles of wine per bag. It also works great for iced tea, mixed drinks, cocktails and chilled shots, like tequila, Fireball and Jägermeister.

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Alcohol Drinks Toasty

Minibar Delivery Gets Into The Wine Biz, Connects Customers To Vineyards

If you need a great bottle of wine for that romantic dinner or a client and want to go beyond the usual rosé, Minibar Delivery may have just the bottle for you.

The on-demand alcohol delivery service recently announced that it is launching Vineyard Select, a nationwide direct-to-consumer wine shipping service that connects customers with independent vineyards, not typically sold in stores, for wine deliveries to their home or office.

To order, wine lovers would need to download the Minibar Delivery app or visit the website and enter the delivery address. They can then browse the wine section to shop from curated vineyards, as well as explore each vineyard and its products. The Vineyard Select launch partners include Penrose Hill, Uproot Wines, and The Blending Lab to offer a variety of wines that fit every price point, with minimum orders that start at $45.

“Direct to consumer wine shipment is a natural expansion for Minibar Delivery,” said Lara Crystal, co-CEO and co-Founder of Minibar Delivery via a statement. “Our customers are wine lovers – wine is the top selling category on our platform. There are so many incredible winemakers out there that aren’t available in traditional liquor stores. With Vineyard Select, we can open up a whole new world of wine to our customers and connect vineyards with a new, enthusiastic customer base.”

Vineyard Select also benefits vineyard partners as they leverage the platform to reach a new marketplace and educate customers on their wine varietals.

The launch of the Vineyard Select program marks a key growth milestone for Minibar Delivery, following its recent influx of $5M in investment capital. In addition to its service of on-demand alcohol delivery in 37 markets across the country, Minibar Delivery makes it easy to send a gift across the country, book a professionally-trained bartender on demand, and access a dedicated concierge service to answer all spirits-related questions.

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Features

How to Pronounce 22 Tricky Wine Names

pronounce-wines

If you walk into BevMo and have trouble pronouncing 90 percent of the wine in there, you’re definitely not alone.

Even if you listen to an insane amount of Rick Ross and Drake, and feel like a champ for being able to pronounce wine like “Rosé,” let’s see how strong you feel trying to pronounce “Gewürztraminer” or “Montepulciano d’Abruzzo.”

The wine game is serious as there are French, Italian and even German pronunciations that can get you stuck in the liquor aisle for a good 20 minutes. Get down these names and you will no longer feel sheepish while staring at a bottle of “Sangiovese.” Or you can just get crazy drunk and totally mispronounce them anyway.

Either way, here’s the guide to pronouncing 22 types of wine:

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Hit-Or-Miss

Stella Artois Brings Upscale ‘European-Style’ Cider to American Markets

stella-artois-cidre

Stella Artois will take its best shot at conquering the American apple cider market on May 13th with the release of their new Stella Artois Cidre — a “European-style” brew that’s definitely not your grandma’s apple cider. Traditional American-style cider is on the sweeter side and brings back fond memories for those of us who first tried cider while gnawing on fried chicken at the country fair, whereas European-style cider dials down the sweetness in exchange for a more varied flavor palate and an excuse to feel extra-sophisticated.

Stella Artois’ take on cider is drier and more savory, with “a more complex taste profile” than leading American ciders. This has Stella Artois industry heads hoping that their cider will overtake white wine as the drink of choice at classy American dinner parties. (Fun fact: Hard cider is also referred to as “apple wine,” which sounds a little more upscale than “alcoholic apple juice.”) For the record, Stella Artois Cidre pairs best with most cheeses, fish, and chicken — just not country fair fried chicken. American cider is still probably best for that.

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Hit-Or-Miss

Introducing Absolut Tune, the Sparkling Wine and Vodka Remix

There’s been plenty of crazy news coming out of New Zealand lately, and between Lord of the Rings-inspired legal tender and a new vodka-infused NZ Sauvignon Blanc, it may be hard to decide which is cooler (Hobbit coins, definitely Hobbit coins). But the official U.S. release of Absolut Tune is probably a close second.

Originally marketed only as a limited-edition product in Australia back in 2011, Absolut Tune celebrated its U.S. launch party last Tuesday in New York City, and is, essentially, just a fancy-looking bubbly liquor. But for 14% ABV and $31.99 per bottle, it could also be your new favorite companion for the wee hours of December 20th.

How’s that for seasonal fare?