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Drinks Packaged Food What's New

The ‘Death Metal’ Of Water Is Here To Disrupt Bottled Water

Upon receiving a can of Liquid Death Mountain Water, I was almost triggered to grab the nearest sharp object to pierce a hole right through the can and shotgun the thing like it was 21-year-old-me back from the dead. Completely unnecessary when it comes to consuming water, sure, but the fact that the healthiest beverage in the world would illicit such a feeling is fascinating enough for something that’s been near impossible to market as exciting.

And that very feeling, where senses are jarred and curiosity is piqued, is the kind of disruption that Liquid Death is aiming for when it comes to shaking things up in the water industry. On its website, the question is raised (along with a healthy and refreshing dose of self-awareness): “Why should unhealthy products be the only brands with “permission” to be loud, fun, and weird? Besides, all marketing and branding is bullshit. So we’re going to take ours less seriously and have more fun with it.”

Beyond the marketing that looks to engage consumers head on and lift bottled water from the depths of boredom, Liquid Death also addresses how the plastic bottles that we are drinking water from aren’t actually recyclable and wind up in the ocean after all. So besides a bit of entertainment, the brand also equips consumers with environmental awareness and healthy benefits. Sounds like a win on all fronts, right? But how about the taste?

Don’t worry, the water doesn’t have any metallic hints in flavor, despite being served up in aluminum cans. And actually, a cold, tall can of Liquid Death adds that extra oomph and satisfaction one gets from pounding an icy can of beer.

As for particulars, Liquid Death is 100% natural, non-carbonated mountain water sourced from the Austrian Alps. Its motto is #DeathToPlastic, because aluminum cans are made up of over 70% recycled material and infinitely recyclable (plastic bottles are only 3% recyclable).

If you’re looking for the most refreshing shotgunned beverage ever, Liquid Death is currently sold on Amazon and at select retail locations.

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Products

Revolutionary Bottle Holds Hot Coffee And Cold Water At The Same Time

Like Ant-Man and The Wasp or Ja Rule and Ashanti, there are some duos that are just destined to work in perfect harmony. While coffee and water used to need their own respective carrying vessels, they are finally getting a joint venture through a Kickstarter campaign called H2Joe .

The H2Joe bottles let you carry around 12 ounces of water AND 12 ounces of coffee at the same time.

The unique flask works by keeping the two liquids in different compartments and two separate spouts, all on the same lid. That means the coffee is being stored at the bottom of the traveler, flowing through its own path, and coming out of its own corresponding spout. Same with the water.

“One of our main goals with H2Joe was to help combat chronic dehydration… without having to sacrifice coffee,” co-founder John Anthony said. “When we designed H2Joe, we wanted it to be easy to transport in one hand and have a natural feel.”

The leak-proof compartments are described as a, “double-walled coffee chamber,” and a “triple-walled water chamber,” which means your coffee won’t get cold for at least six hours, and your water won’t get warm for at least eight hours.

This is extremely convenient for busy folks who usually carry around two bottles. You know who you are.

The bottle’s starting Kickstarter pledge price for the first 24 hours is $34, which will go up to $49 thereafter. The campaign funding goal of $20,000, set to end March 13.

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Drinks Health Products

This Water Bottle Lets You Purify Any Water In SECONDS

Proper hydration is essential. There’s no working around that. The human body needs plenty of water to keep it fully functional and healthy. So what happens when you’re in an environment where safe drinking water is harder to come by?

Grayl, a water bottle purification company, has developed a new tool to help make drinking water safe wherever you go.

Photo Courtesy of Grayl

Said to be the world’s fastest portable purifier, the GeoPress Purifier is capable of removing all waterborne pathogens like viruses, bacteria, and protozoan cysts. It is also capable of filtering sediments, chemicals, heavy metals, and micro plastics from the water source.

All you have to do is fill the device with dirty water from streams, spigots, or sketchy sinks, press the bottle down on any low surface and the bottle will purify the water in about eight seconds.

Photo Courtesy of Grayl

Beginning as a Kickstarter campaign, the GeoPress has already reached more than $214,000 of their $30,000 goal at the time of publication. Now that the project is fully-funded, expect to find the GeoPress on the Grayl page in the near future.

A near instantaneous portable water filtration device is a game-changer. Maybe grabbing one will give me an excuse to get out more.

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Drinks Health News

Lawsuit Alleges That LaCroix Contains Insecticides, Here’s What We Know

Popular sparkling water brand LaCroix is in the middle of a lawsuit for allegedly containing a key ingredient found in insecticides, but labeling their water as “all natural.”

According to a statement from Beaumont Costales, the law firm suing LaCroix’s parent company Natural Beverage Corporation, tests revealed that there were a number of artificial ingredients in the popular beverage brand. These ingredients listed were identified by as “synthetic” by the Food and Drug Administration.

So here’s what people see on the back of a LaCroix can:

  • Carbonated water
  • Natural flavor

A pretty simple combination, right? So what’s the problem?

In the lawsuit, the chemicals under “natural flavor” identified were limonene, linalool propionate, and linalool. Limonene is known to cause tumors and kidney toxicity and linalool can be found inside cockroach insecticide.

When news of the lawsuit broke, many people on our social media disavowed LaCroix for their alleged “shadiness.” The company, however, publicly denied all of this.

To mollify the masses dumping their LaCroix in the trash, Popular Science broke down the three “synthetic” ingredients listed in the lawsuit so consumers would have a better idea exactly how dangerous LaCroix actually is. Spoiler alert: It’s not.

Limonene

Limonene is a “naturally occurring chemical” that’s derived from the oil of citrus peels. The Food and Drug Administration lists limonene as safe in food, where it’s commonly used as a flavor and fragrance. There is little evidence that the chemical is cancerous to humans (though some in rodents), and some studies have even shown that it helps battle cancer.

Linalool

PubChem states that linalool is another “naturally occurring” agent found in flowers and spice plants. This includes herbs, cinnamon, mints, and laurels. While it is used in insecticides, PubChem advocates that it isn’t necessarily harmful to consume. The only side effects are mild eye and skin irritation, where someone eating spicy foods would experience the same results.

Linalool Propionate

The final ingredient linalool propionate, or linayl propionate, is found in ginger and lavender oils. The chemical ingredient is also said to be used as a means to help treat prostate cancer. Popular Science notes that the lawsuit’s statement of linalool propionate battling cancer cells really doesn’t do much for their argument.

So where does this leave the casual LaCroix drinkers worried that they could be pounding chemicals into their bodies?

 

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Facts on the table, it sounds like LaCroix is still safe to drink. While we won’t really know if the ingredients found in LaCroix were derived naturally or synthetically until a full investigation is launched, the quantity used in a can appears to be nothing to stress over.

The National Beverage Corps has since snapped back at the lawsuit, stating that it was filed “without basis in fact or law regarding the natural composition of its LaCroix sparkling waters” and that the parent company “will vigorously seek actual and punitive damages among other remedies from everyone involved in the publication of these defamatory falsehoods.”

We’ll see in the weeks to come where this case leaves sparkling water brand.

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Video

This Massive Spider Crab Left Its Group To Chase A Scuba Diver And The Footage Is Terrifying

There are only five things I’m terrified of on this planet, three I’ll share with you right now: Jeff Goldblum’s Brundle-Fly, crippling loneliness , and the vast undiscovered depths of the sea.

Denizens of the deep, like these spider crabs, are probably just crustaceans trying to hustle in this underwater world of theirs. Still doesn’t make the footage you’re about to see any less terrifying.

A video posted by Pink Tank Scuba captures a group of enormous spider crabs scuttling across the ocean floor. One of the crabs notices the scuba diver and leaves the group to confront the diver head on.

Check out the unnerving footage, in high definition, as the creature cuddles up to the cameraman.

Luckily, the entire cast of crabs didn’t follow suit. Now that would have been an experience that would have chilled me to my core.

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Drinks Hit-Or-Miss Packaged Food Products Tastemade/Snapchat

13 Of The Strangest Drinks You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

What’s strange to you may be common to another. The camel’s milk sold at Whole Foods, for example, may throw you for a loop, but that’s just because you haven’t grown up with such a product. Cow’s milk isn’t exactly a huge leap from camel’s milk, but unfamiliarity always glows brightest on the shelf.

So if you expanded your curiosity to stretch around the entire world, you may discover some drinks that would downright blow your mind. Likewise, there are drinks you yourself enjoy that would shock residents of other countries and cultures. And then of course there are drinks that are bizarre and goofy to shoppers everywhere. So let’s jump into the wild world of drinks you don’t see every day.

Water Salad

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Naturally, such a curious product comes from the Japanese arm of Coca-Cola, and it even comes in six different flavors. It honestly seems like a health drink in a dystopian sci-fi flick.

Eel Soda

Eel is the selling point here, not the secret ingredient. Unagi soda reportedly tastes like kabayaki. So if you love grilled eel in soy sauce, and it’s a hot summer’s day, guess what is about to fix everything about your life? This. Drink.

Baby Mice Wine


This absolutely looks like a high school science experiment, one that hasn’t obviously gone right or wrong. In its production process, newborn mice (three days or younger) are drowned in rice wine, and after 12 to 14 months, the drink is made available. Batches vary severely, as a bad one will straight up taste like gasoline.

Pizza Beer

Made by Mamma Mia!, the “World’s First Culinary Beer” debuted in 2006 and the taste has likely still not left everyone’s mouth—not a bad way to live either. It started at the Seefurth Family’s home brewery in Illinois with a surplus of tomatoes and a bag of garlic. But that idea grew and tremendously evolved into a legitimate boozy recipe. A margarita pizza is put into mash and steeped like a tea bag. It’s then filtered into a brew pot and boiled, with hops and spices added in a cheesecloth-like bag. In the end, voilà, pizza beer! Honestly, it’s quite the way to cut back on expenses, no longer needing to buy pizza and beer.

Panda Dung Tea

When it comes to green tea, you likely think of a pleasant scene of you relaxing between careful sipsand poop is absolutely nowhere to be found. Well, in a special blend debuted by wildlife expert An Yashi, the two are one in the same. Since pandas have poor digestion, only absorbing roughly 30% of what they consume, their dung is rich in fibers and nutrients. It’s surprisingly high quality actually. As of a few years ago, it was speculated to be going for $35,000 per pound.

Seagull Wine

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You’re likely unfamiliar with trends and interests within the Arctic Circle, and this one’s a doozy. The recipe is easy, since it’s simply keeping a dead seagull in a bottle or jug of water and allowing it to ferment in direct sunlight. Not totally sure what the buzz is like, but it’s likely safe to assume it’s strong.

Gau Jal

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Also referred to as Cow Water, Gau Jal came about in India as a healthier alternative to soda. It’s believed that cow urine has the potential to address several diseases and thanks to the Hindu organization Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, it was made viably marketable.

Peruvian Frog Juice

While it may not be a go-to health drink in the United States, like kombucha or a smoothie, residents of Bolivia and Peru toss a frog in a blender—a skinned Titicaca water frog, to be exact. The frog’s not alone in the blender, though, as ingredients such as carrots and honey are included as well.

Bird’s Nest Drink

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You may have heard of bird’s nest soup, but the key ingredient isn’t just for sit-down meals. The bird nests of Southeast Asia’s edible-nest swiftlets are created with solidified saliva that’s believed to be very nutritional for humans—high in calcium, iron, magnesium, etc. Given that we’re an increasingly on-the-go species, a bird’s nest drink was inevitable.

Snake Bile Wine

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This is an intense drink and it’s not just because of its name, which is wholly accurate and definitely not a gimmick. If it’s made for in-restaurant consumption, rather than bottled for sales, the delicacy beverage is prepared before you at a restaurant when the dedicated employee slices open the gallbladder of a live cobra. The bile is then mixed with rice wine, making for a green-black cocktail that’s supposed to offer health benefits, such as enhancing male virility.

Three Penis Liquor

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If you’re a fan of The League, you’re already familiar with this wild concept—though Taco was pitching wine. However, it’s, in fact, totally real, and that may come as a rather huge surprise. The not-so-secret ingredients of Tezhi Sanbian Jiu are deer penis, dog penis, and seal penis. Given the a long-standing belief that consumption of severed animal penises can mean a more dynamic libido in males, maybe this isn’t so shocking.

Placenta Smoothie

As one of the most empowering drinks around, placenta smoothies have seen an uptick in popularity in recent years. So it’s not exactly a drink you’ve never heard of, but we simply can’t leave it off this list. New moms have reported impressive health benefits accordingly, including more energy, lower blood pressure, and reduced post-natal bleeding. There aren’t really any drinks to compare it to. Seriously, how often do you have the chance to drink your own body part?

Diet Water

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The world is so impossibly confusing at times. This doesn’t make any sense. Diet water is like dividing zero! Or I think so anyway. I’m honestly not sure if that simile tracks. I took pre-calculus my junior year of high school, my senior year of high, and my freshman year of college and scored an increasingly worse grade each time. *sigh* This is Diet Water’s fault!

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Drinks Health Now Trending

Silicon Valley’s Latest Craze, Raw ‘Live Water’, Can Actually Kill You

Silicon Valley is home to quite a few different bizarre health crazes, like biohacking. Their latest craze involves drinking untreated raw “live water,” and it feels like something straight out of a Parks and Recreation episode. Actually, it kinda is, to be honest.

According to an extensive feature from the New York Times, this new “live water” movement involves people wanting to get away from tap water. Their argument is that the filtration processes remove “beneficial minerals,” healthy probiotic bacteria, and disconnect drinkers from “big infrastructure.” It’s gained so much appeal that folks are willing to pay up to $60 per gallon to get their hands on this untreated, unfiltered water.

One of the allures to this raw water is the fact that it doesn’t contain any fluoride. The chemical is commonly used to treat our water and kill bacteria, but Live Water CEO Mukhande Singh told the Times that it does more harm than good.

“Tap water? You’re drinking toilet water with birth control drugs in them… Call me a conspiracy theorist, but [fluoride] is a mind control drug that has no benefit to our dental health.”

By drinking unfiltered water, those in the movement feel that they are drinking more pure and healthier water, and the lack of fluoride is a big reason. However, what folks aren’t taking into account with the raw water is that it’s chock full of bacteria and pathogens, many of which are deadly. Cholera, giardia, E.coli, and Hepatitis A are all just some of the commonly found microbes to watch out for.

It was fluoride that got these out of tap water and eradicated most of those diseases from first world countries to begin with. The thought of risking the returns of those potentially deadly illnesses should be enough of a warning to know not to drink raw water.

For those who need more convincing, a controversy like this has been discussed before in Parks and Recreation. In season 6, episode 8, main character Leslie Knope is fighting to prevent a fluoride ban on the drinking water of Pawnee. However, fear mongering of fluoride as a dangerous “chemical” has the town convinced that the ban should go through. Luckily, some clever marketing from Aziz Ansari’s character, Tom Haverford, persuades people that the health benefits far outweigh the fear-mongered risks.

Maybe someone should try pitching T-Dazzle to the live water advocates to help save them from the eventual sicknesses they will develop if they keep drinking the unfiltered stuff.

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News

Heartless Houston Market Sells Cases Of Water For $99 After Hurricane Harvey

cases of water, hurricane harvey

After disaster hit Texas this weekend, basic supplies were likely in high demand, and it looks like heartless retailers took advantage of the situation.

The Texas Attorney General’s Office said they’ve gotten 684 complaints over price-gouging after Hurricane Harvey, including one unnamed market which sold cases of water for a whopping $99, according to CNN Money.

While we don’t need to try very hard to convince you that $99 for water is insane, for comparison’s sake, a 24-pack of Nestle Pure Life water is only $9.82 at Walmart. That means this market applied at least a 908 percent increase over regular prices.

If the people of Houston don’t want to splurge on the $99 case of water, they can opt for a single bottle priced at $8.50.

It’s a bit sad to see markets take advantage of a tragedy, especially when there are so many positive stories of people trying to help each other through this disaster.