Categories
Drinks Fast Food Plant-Based Technology

Dunkin’ Donuts Built A House That Runs On Used Coffee Grounds

Photo Courtesy of Dunkin’ Donuts

Most people need a hot cup of coffee to power themselves up before they can even think about getting through the day. While the effects of coffee are quite powerful, I’ve never really considered the potential they have beyond keeping me from dozing off in the shower.

Harnessing said potential, Dunkin’ Donuts took it upon themselves to build a Home That Runs on Dunkin’ Donuts’ coffee. More specifically, used coffee grinds.

The idea was to take wasted resources and figure out a way to convert them into fuel, as part of an initiative towards a cleaner planet. The coffee brand partnered with Blue Marble Energy to create a biofuel made from the oil extracted from the used coffee grounds from Dunkin’ Donuts.

The biofuel is an 80% blend of coffee oil and 20% blend of alcohol that’s added to a generator which, in turn, powers every facet of the home.

The design of the house itself is also inspired by Dunkin’ Donuts coffee, with the textures and colors resembling the the richness of coffee grinds.

Anyone wishing to check out this tiny coffee-powered house will find it at Madison Square Park from Oct. 4 through Oct. 6.

Categories
Hacks Hit-Or-Miss Video

How These Food Storage Tips Can Save You Money

Avocados, man.

One blink and their Kermit-green hue has turned into a muddy brown. We can thank Ethylene for this one, a natural gas that fruits and vegetables emit which speeds up the ripening process. This leads surrounding produce to rot at a rapid pace.

According to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Americans waste up to 40% of their food, meaning a whopping $165 billion is thrown away each year.  This is partially caused by failing to appropriately store produce in the kitchen. Remember those bananas you bought yesterday? Well they’re probably as good as banana bread by now.

Not to be the kitchen cop, but these three storage tricks will help you put a halt to wasted fruits and veggies. Watch this video to learn how you can avoid turning your kitchen into a landfill.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

This Danish Supermarket Only Sells Expired Foods and Everyone Loves It

wefood2-1

First World countries are striving to end world hunger, yet they are guilty of wasting a ridiculous amount of food themselves.

Now one country is launching an initiative to change that irony by opening its first food waste supermarket. Denmark has opened its first-ever charity market, which sells surplus produce that are past their fresh date or damaged in such a way that they wouldn’t be sold on the shelves of a typical grocery store.

wefood

The store called WeFood in Denmark’s capital city of Copenhagen sells their produce for 30 to 50% of their value at normal markets. The store is designed for the environmentally conscious and budget-limited consumers who are looking to save money and the planet. Per Bjerre from the Danish NGO behind the initiative, Folkekirkens Nødhjælp, explained to the Independent:

“WeFood is the first supermarket of its kind in Denmark and perhaps the world as it is not just aimed at low-income shoppers, but anyone who is concerned about the amount of food waste produced in this country. Many people see this as a positive and politically correct way to approach the issue.”

More NextShark Stories: These Photos Are Going to Stress You Out

wefood3-e1456794700467

According to statistics, 700,000 metric tons of food are thrown away in Denmark annually. That is the figure after the country reduced its food waste by 25% over five years. Worldwide, 1.3 billion metric tons of food is wasted each year. The number is “ridiculous,” Danish Food and Agriculture Minister Eva Kjer Hansen remarked.

WeFood is collaborating with other supermarkets, chains and importers to provide the products. Volunteers pick up the supplies to help stock WeFood’s shelves. France has taken a similar course of action by banning food waste and requiring supermarkets to donate unwanted food to food banks and charities.

Written by Editorial Staff, NextShark

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

All Supermarkets In France Are Now Required to Give Unsold Food to the Needy

supermarche-e1454956247591

The French government enacted a law on Wednesday making it mandatory for supermarkets in France to donate unwanted food to food banks or charities.

The petition was launched by local councilman Arash Derambarsh and was unanimously passed by the country’s senate, reports the Independent. The effort was reportedly campaigned by anti-poverty groups who were opposed to food waste. These groups are now hoping the rest of the EU follows suit with a similar law.

Fines of up to 75,000 euros ($83,700) or two years in prison will be incurred for those who violate the new law which applies to any supermarket that covers a minimum of 400 square meters of floor area.

It has been a practice of some local supermarkets to pour bleach over the discarded food or to lock them in warehouses to prevent foraging.

You Might Like This From NextShark: What Starbucks Looks Like In 17 Different Countries

Jacques Bailet, head of Banques Alimentaires, a network of French food banks, told the The Guardian that “it would greatly increase an already emerging trend for supermarkets to donate to food banks.”

“In terms of nutritional balance, we currently have a deficit of meat and a lack of fruit and vegetables. This will hopefully allow us to push for those products,” said Bailet.

The legislation is widely seen as simplifying a complicated process of donating directly to charity.

Each year over 7.8 million tons of food are wasted in France while 1.4 billion tons are wasted worldwide.

Written by Editorial Staff, NextShark

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

This Is The Nasty Crap The FDA Allows In Your Food

FDA-Food-Defects

Opening a bag of pretzels can be harmless enough. You’d never think to find rat droppings, maggots, or mold in your salted snack. Turns out, no matter how disgusting these things sound, the Food and Drug Administration says it’s safe to eat.

Live Science found a booklet published by the FDA titled the Defect Levels Handbook. In it, the book lists more than 100 different foods and foreign things found in those foods. Among them include: rodent filth, maggots, fly eggs, grit, sand, cigarette butts, mold and grit.

Of course, the FDA doesn’t approve noticeable chunks of these nasty things in your food. Rather, the booklet lists acceptable levels of each item that’s allowed to be present in food. For example, wheat flour might contain microscopic amounts of rodent hair and excrement.

According to the FDA, it’s economically impractical to think you can grow or produce any kinds of foods without some bits of these “defect.” Yes, they’re officially referring to them as defects rather than hazardous waste materials.

Photo: The Lonely Island

Categories
News

France Is Banning Supermarkets From Throwing Away UNSOLD Foods, Must Be Given To Charities

French-Law-Food

A new law in France will make sure supermarkets won’t be able to throw out unsold food, reports The Guardian. In a unanimous vote by the French national assembly, a legislation was passed to prevent grocers from throwing out or destroying unsold products.

Instead, they’ll be required by law to donate to charities.

Most packaged foods sport a “Best By” date somewhere on the product. While they’re still edible after that period, stores don’t tend to keep the ones past the printed dates stocked. These foods are usually what’s destroyed, even if they’re still perfectly safe to eat.

Supermarkets that fail to comply with this new law and purposely soil their foods will face fines up to €75,000 ($82,500 US) or two years of jail time.

France has been working to find a solution to its food waste issue and those struggling to eat in the country. The goal is to reduce food waste in half within the next decade. Because of this, the new law also introduces an education program dealing with food waste in schools and businesses.

 

Categories
Technology

Food Waste and Poop: How to Ride a Bus Into the Future

Bio-Bus

With all the foods we’re cramming into our bodies, we might as well make the most of the waste we’re producing. Why not a poop bus? The UK currently has a bus running between Bristol Airport and Bath city center that’s powered by food waste and human feces. Poo.

The Bio Bus is fueled by biomethane gas, produced through decomposed organic matter or animal and human byproducts. The bus can travel up to 186 miles on a single tank of fuel, which is roughly a year’s worth of bowel movements for five people. Possibly three people with a bean burrito-heavy diet.

You don’t have to hold your breath, however, as the fuel has had its impurities stripped leaving behind a “virtually odorless” emission. With the gas tanks on the roof of the bus, it’s pretty much as stinky as any other regular form of public transportation.

Biomethane gas is known to reduce greenhouse emissions by 88 percent when stacked against gasoline. It’s pretty much the same as a natural gas as it utilizes fresh matter rather than decomposed.

Renewable gas, as a whole, is becoming a more common form of fuel. While the US uses Biomethane gas on a smaller scale, European countries like Sweden and Germany use it a fair amount, according to the US Department of Energy. A quarter of Germany’s natural gas stations dispense Biomethane as fuel, while 38,500 of Sweden’s vehicles utilize the same.

The future is poo.

h/t Mashable

Categories
Technology

New ‘PareUp’ App Lets Restaurants Sell Discount Leftovers Instead of Throwing Them Away

pareup

It was a cruel and stupid person who decided restaurants shouldn’t be allowed to give their leftovers away at the end of the night, a decision which the USDA estimates results in about 133 billion pounds of food from retailers, restaurants, and homes wasted every year. Thankfully it doesn’t have to be this way.

Over in New York, a new startup called PareUp wants to help, well, pair restaurants and consumers looking to sell and buy excess foodstuffs at discounted prices. Set to launch in the Apple store by fall and be available to Android users “in the future,” according to the Los Angeles Times, the mobile app will store inventories of participating retailers’ products, allow retailers to update and set prices for the listings, and inform customers of the offerings for the day.

Like similar app Leftover Swap, which allows users to upload photos of their leftovers for other, nearby users to locate and potentially pick up, the goal of PareUp is to cut down on waste and help food retailers increase profits — albeit in a significantly less sketchy, poison-prone way.

A prototype is expected to be available by the end of summer, with the first partnered restaurants including New York City’s Oslo Coffee Roasters and Breads Bakery. With any luck, the app will find success and spread to the West Coast. Helloooo, discounted milky buns.

H/T PSFK + PicThx PareUp