Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Woman Mistakes Wasabi for Avocado: Don’t Try This At Home

An Israeli woman mistook wasabi for avocado and was subsequently hospitalized for ‘broken heart syndrome‘. 

The 60-year old woman thought that the wasabi served at the wedding was, in fact, some sort of guacamole or avocado dip. She ate a large amount of it and then she started to feel a sudden pressure in her chest which moved down to her arms soon enough. As someone whose eyes get wet when I accidentally eat just a bit more wasabi than I can take, I cannot possibly imagine what the poor woman felt in the moment.

Weirdly, the woman chose to stay at the wedding, even though she was probably in a lot of pain, and she later said that the sensation lasted for a few hours.

She only decided to go to the hospital the next morning, when she woke up feeling weak and uncomfortable. The doctors performed an electrocardiogram and diagnosed her with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as ‘broken heart syndrome’. This is a temporary disruption of [the] heart’s normal pumping function in one area of the heart. It usually only happens to people over 50 years of age and it’s usually triggered by extreme emotional or physical stress, like the death of a loved one or a car accident.

This appears to be the first incident where eating something triggers the broken heart syndrome, according to a report in BMJ Case Reports. There have been others in the past that were connected to a severe allergic reaction or anaphylaxis.

“To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of takotsubo cardiomyopathy triggered by wasabi consumption,” the researchers wrote.

Happily, the woman recovered after the incident and will probably never touch anything resembling avocado again.

You can also read about the cases of avocado hand and maybe decide not to eat avocado again, like I think I have.

Featured image by Jonathan Valencia from Pixabay

Article by Ruxandra Grecu from So Delicious. View the original article here.

Categories
Culture Video

Watch American Kids Try Japanese Food For The First Time

Japanese food is definitely one of our go-to dinner choices after a long day at work. While the thought of a Japanese dinner leaves our mouths salivating, there are a ton of people who haven’t tried the cuisine before.

WatchCut Video‘s latest video has a bunch of American kids trying Japanese food for the first time in their young lives.

The dishes featured included: miso soup, Natto Gohan (fermented soybeans), sashimi (raw fish), daikon (pickled radish), umeboshi (pickled plums), Udon noodles, shrimp tempura, and Oshiruko (red bean soup & mochi).

While a savory feast for those familiar, these dishes can often come off as strange and off-putting to children unfamiliar with the cuisine. Still, props to these kids for giving the food a fair shake. Plus, there’s a hilarious B Plot where no one can figure out how to use the chopsticks.

Check out the adorable video and see if you can pass up some Japanese food for dinner.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss Tastemade/Snapchat

10 Of The Most Loved Condiments Around The World

 

Whether you’re the kind of person who squirts ketchup all over their fries or dips them (or maybe you prefer mayo or aioli), chances are you’re not omitting the condiment altogether. Spreads and sauces make our meals complete, so take a gander at what everyone else in the world is frantically scooping out of jars.

Harissa

Tunisia/North Africa

harissa-15918-3

Photo: Delicious

When the Spanish brought chili peppers into 16th century Tunisia, they couldn’t have possibly known they were becoming a part of condiment history. Though the taste evolves as you move through North Africa, this chili paste always has an undeniable kick and consistency. It also serves as the primary flavor within merguez, a North African lamb sausage. With flavor you want to take home to your mother, harissa is a staple at any meal.

 

Wasabi

Japan

grating-wasabi-jpg-838x0_q80

Photo: Mother Nature Network

Dating back to the 10th century, the wasabi plant has spiced up Japanese cuisine. The plant requires cold, freshwater with a balance of minerals in order to thrive, making its production very rare. Wasabi’s growing popularity beyond Japan brought about many alternative condiments which are primarily made of horseradish and green food dye. Authentic wasabi spoils within 15 minutes of preparation which led to the tradition of serving it beneath sushi, in order to preserve its flavor.

 

Mayonnaise

The United States

mayonnaise-poisonous-heated_24e0a132d52d6559

Photo: Reference

For many years, ketchup was the head honcho in the U.S. Over the past couple of years, however, Americans declared that mayo was the new sheriff in town. Whether due to a surge in deviled egg popularity or homemade sandwiches, mayonnaise spread throughout the country at an unusually high rate, beginning in 2013. The eggy sauce has its roots in France or Spain, depending on who you ask, but no one can find more uses for it than a Yankee.

 

Banana Sauce

The Philippines

img_2336

Photo: The Actor’s Diet

When the United States began influencing the Philippines in the mid-20th century, ketchup caught on quickly throughout the nation. During World War II, a tomato ketchup was a rare sight. Since tomatoes were scarce across the islands, banana sauce aka banana ketchup was invented. Often dyed red to mimic the look of traditional ketchup, banana sauce’s sweetness easily sets it apart from tomato ketchup while still sharing many of its uses.

 

Vegemite

Australia

2016%2f08%2f16%2f12%2f062bdaa1bffd47cfabc750f4381203e3-fc4b9

Photo: Mashable

The Brits initially had the stranglehold on this substance in a less salty spread called Marmite. In 1923, however, Cyril Callister recreated the recipe from scratch, with more sodium and Vitamin B. The sticky breakfast condiment made from brewer’s yeast cemented itself as uniquely Australian when it became a part of army rations during World War II. In 2015, Aussies started using Vegemite to create alcohol, prompting calls from the government to limit its sale. For some, a law probably isn’t necessary.

 

Ajvar

Serbia

ajvar-recipe-serbian-red-pepper-relish

Photo: Cooking the Globe

This so-called “Serbian Salsa” is served throughout the Balkan nations as a relish or a side dish. Though, like the nations it’s made in, ajvar’s name changes every so often, the red pepper paste is always dependable. Spread on a hot meat dish or as a cold appetizer, ajvar will prove to your tastebuds that it can wear many hats.

 

Chutney

India

046_main1

Photo: RecipesHubs

For thousands of years, chutney has been an irreplaceable relish that sweetens or spices, depending on how its made. Ancient holy men, Brahmins, discovered the preservative powers of spices and began to mix them with various fruits and vegetables. The British would eventually carry sweet chutneys to the U.K. as well as its African and Caribbean territories, but Indian chutneys remain complex in taste and texture.

 

Hoisin Sauce

China

khr-1065b_1z

Photo: Soap

Not to be confused with Vietnamese sriracha, hoisin sauce lends a tangy glaze to any dish. Essentially a Chinese (specifically Cantonese) barbeque sauce, this condiment lies at the intersection of a brown sauce and hot sauce. In fact, Peking ducks would feel underdressed without their healthy coat of hoisin sauce.

 

Salsa

Mexico/South America

sauces-chismol-flickr-jeffreyww-5923456035-4x3

Photo: Whats4Eats

As early as 3000 BC, the Aztecs mixed chilis with tomatillos. Over the millennia that followed, the recipes got only slightly more complicated and the Conquistadors eventually named this mixture “salsa.” The precursor to many modern hot sauces in the Americas, salsa’s versatility in heat and consistency has given it a wide appeal.

 

Brown Sauce

The United Kingdom/Ireland

hp-sauce

Photo: The Spectator

The popular brand may be HP, but brown sauce by any other name would be as delicious to serve with some fish and chips. Brown sauces can be sweet or tart, but mostly resemble American steak sauces. With a variety of uses in many savory dishes, it’s no wonder you’ll likely find a bottle in any British home.

Categories
Cravings Culture Video

We Need To Talk About How The Wasabi You’re Eating Is Most Likely Fake

wasabi-ns-cover-001

Foreigners who are into Japanese food but haven’t actually been to Japan may want to check this short video that reveals a shocking secret about imported wasabi. While the clip simply explains why real wasabi is quite rare and difficult to find, it also points out one surprising fact in its title: “The Wasabi You Eat Probably Isn’t Wasabi”

wasabi-ns-001

The video, produced by All Nippon Airways in partnership with video network Great Big Story, explores the delicate art of wasabi cultivation, according to RocketNews24.

wasabi-ns-002

Filmed in the Hotaka countryside in Nagano Prefecture, the production showed farmers from the Daio Wasabi Farm explaining how to cultivate a plant dubbed as the “hardest to grow”. Its delicate cultivation process makes the plant very expensive and rare to find outside Japan.

Overseas, it is usually substituted with horseradish dyed with green food coloring.

wasabi-ns-003

One can always visit Japan and buy the Wasabia Japonica plant. To release its flavor, however, requires grinding the plant on a shark-skin grater. Its complex, sweet flavor combined with its unique spicy twist is not hard to miss.

wasabi-ns-004

The plant also requires 13-18 degrees Celsius (55 – 64 degrees Fahrenheit) spring water, a particular amount of shade and sunlight, and a year-and-a-half in the soil to grow perfectly.

wasabi-ns-005

This means that unless you are in Japan or are provided with authentic Japanese cuisine, it’s highly unlikely you have eaten actual wasabi at all. Many people have actually missed out on the true flavor of the rare plant and have been eating horseradish all along.

Written By Ryan General | NextShark

Categories
Culture News Restaurants

Sushi Bar Under Fire For Allegedly Pranking Tourists By Hiding Tons Of Wasabi In Their Food

wasabi-stk-001

A sushi chain in Osaka, Japan is being accused of discrimination after foreign customers claimed that sushi chefs put in twice as much wasabi as usual in their sushi. 

The restaurant chain, Ichibazushi, issued an apology on their website earlier this week stating that chefs did put more wasabi in the food of unsuspecting customers, but claimed it wasn’t because of discrimination.

Instead, they reasoned it was because many foreign customers request extra ginger and wasabi with their food, so the higher amounts of wasabi became a norm of sorts. The chain’s operator stated:

“Because many of our overseas customers frequently order extra amounts of pickled ginger and wasabi, we gave them more without checking first.

“The result was unpleasant for some guests who aren’t fans of wasabi.”

It is unclear how many cases of wasabi overdose occurred, but when the story was picked up by the national media, netizens began complaining of “wasabi terrorism” and even racism, according to ChannelNewsAsia

Written by NextShark

Categories
Celebrity Grub Cravings Recipes Video

Gordon Ramsay Shows Us How He Enjoys His Tacos

As we’re craving tacos on the glorious day that is National Taco Day, we found ourselves drawn to a Gordon Ramsay recipe from a few years back.

The Michelin-starred chef shows us how he does tacos by making some marinated beef tacos with a wasabi mayonnaise.

First, he starts off by searing the steaks. As the meat cooks, he works on creating a miso-marinade. Once the steaks are seared on both sides, they go into the mixo mixture. While the meat is soaking, Ramsay preps his lettuce, toasts the tortillas, and makes the wasabi mayo.

For the mayo, Ramsay uses a dime-sized portion of wasabi and thoroughly mixes it with three tablespoons of mayonnaise.

Finally, the steak is removed from the marinade and sliced into strips. With all the ingredients ready, he starts assembling his taco.

Ramsay’s version is a pretty elevated take on the classic Mexican dish. While it may not be for everyone, the world-famous chef definitely knows how to make a good-looking taco.

Speaking of tacos, it’s time to go grab some.

Categories
Cravings

How To Make Panda Sushi That’s Almost Too Cute To Eat

Panda-Sushi-Cover

Sometimes, it can be difficult to get kids to try new foods like sushi. What if, however, that piece of sushi looked as whimsical as this Panda roll? Make Sushi, known for creating beautiful works of art contained within a sushi roll, has created a roll resembling the adorable South China bear.

All you need is a few basic ingredients: a small piece of sushi grade tuna, several Nori sheets, some cooked sushi rice, 2 heaped tablespoons of wasabi masago and 1 heaped tablespoon of chopped coriander.

Cut the tuna into four slices: two 1 cm and two 0.5 cm in thickness. Marinate the slices in a bowl of soy sauce for 30 minutes to an hour. Definitely no more than an hour or the tuna will harden.

Add the 2 tablespoons of wasabi masago to the cooked sushi rice. Then, add the chopped coriander and gently mix together with the rice and masago. Make sure the ingredients are spread evenly into the mixture. Once you’re down, set it aside.

Panda-Sushi-Step

Remove the tuna from the fridge and cut to appropriate thickness for the eyes (bigger), nose and mouth (smaller). Horizontally lay down a sheet of nori and place the first tuna strip at the edge of the nori sheet. Wrap the nori around the fish, covering the whole strip and cut off the excess nori.

Keep repeating this until you have six different strips: two parts, two eyes, a nose and a mouth.

With a new sheet of nori, add a small handful of sushi at the center and spread it into an oblong shape. Make sure the rice touches the top and bottom of the nori.

Place a think strip of wrapped tuna flat in the middle of the rice for the mouth. Then, add a think layer of rice on top of the tuna strip covering the strip. Repeat the step with another thin tuna strip.

Now, place the two thick tuna strips on top of the column to make the eyes of the panda. Then, add more rice between the two strips. Carefully mold the column with white rice to make sure that the panda has a round face.

Make Sushi says to now take one side of the nori and curl it up and  around the column of rice. Repeat the step with the other side so that the two sides overlap at the top. Compress the roll with your hands gently rolling into a circular shape. Set that aside.

Taking two sheets of nori, lay them horizontally. Then, glue the sheets together by putting a thin column of sushi rice on the edge of one of the sheets and sticking it with the other nori sheet.

Now, take the GREEN sushi rice and cover about 3/4 of the large nori sheet with it. Be careful so that it stays light and fluffy.

Using two chopsticks, press them to the center of the green rice (two centimeters apart). Now, remove the chopsticks. You should have two grooves that you can now place the last two pieces of rolled tuna inside. These are the panda ears.

Place your panda face roll on top of the ears you just made. Make sure the eyes are at the bottom next to the ears.

Now, dip a sharp knife in som cold water (so it doesn’t stick to the rice), then carefully cut the roll with as little motion as possible. Cut off each end of the roll first, then section off your panda sushi in whatever thickness you want.

Mostly, the recipe is just stacking and careful rolling. You can get a play-by-play of the exact process in the video above.

Categories
Packaged Food

Lay’s ‘Do Us a Flavor Winner’ Is Not Cappuccino

Lays-Chips-Flavors

Many potato chip fans may remember a few months ago that four Frito-Lay’s test flavors hit the shelves. America snacked on them and snacked on them hard in order keep their favorite on the shelves. The finalists in the “Do Us a Flavor” competition were: Mango Salsa, Wasabi Ginger, Cappuccino and Bacon Mac & Cheese.

Wasabi-Ginger-Lays-Chip-Winner

It looks like Wasabi Ginger came out on top as it was officially named the winner of the contest. Those of you who remember our taste test and prediction back in July now know that, yes, we called it. While we did enjoy Cappuccino more than the other two runners-up, we’re guessing everyone else didn’t.

USA Today reports that Meneko Spigner McBeth, the creator of Wasabi Ginger, was declared the winner on Monday at a dinner for the finalists. McBeth will receive either a year’s worth of Lay’s Wasabi Ginger sales or $1 million, whichever figure ends up higher. Not bad.

H/T USA Today