Categories
Fast Food Hit-Or-Miss Opinion

This McDonald’s Employee Just Stood Up For All Fast Food Workers

As a society, we tend to look up to people like lawyers, doctors, astronauts, actors and musicians, since we consider those professions to be some of the hardest to be successful at. Adversely, we associate lower-paying jobs with laziness and poverty, a habit we are all likely guilty of. Well, one man in particular got sick and tired of the bullshit.

Mike Waite, a young man living in Edinburgh, Scotland, and working at a local McDonald’s, was pushed over the edge recently after one too many people criticized him for his work. Maintaining composure and refraining from cursing, Mike put into words what many fast food employees think and feel in their hearts in regards to the work they do.

Do you agree with Mike? Post your thoughts in the comments section!

Categories
Restaurants

Joe’s Crab Shack Just Became The First MAJOR Restaurant Chain To Ban Tipping

Joes-Crab-Shack-Stk

Last month, restauranteur Danny Meyer implemented a much talked-about “No Tipping” rule at his restaurants. Rather than leaving money for their servers, patrons would see a slight price increase in their meals and servers would be paid a higher hourly wage.

Now, in a major move, Joe’s Crab Shack has become the first major chain to implement that No Tipping policy at 18 of their major units. Restaurant Business reports that servers will see a starting pay bump of $14 an hour. While $14 is the base, servers actual wages will vary depending on their past performance.

Joe’s parent company, Ignite Restaurant Group, says that the pay increases will come from the 12 to 15 percent price elevation for menu items. According to Ignite CEO Ray Blanchette, the test began in August and have been implemented in more Joe’s Crab Shacks as recently as last Tuesday.

Blanchette says that the new wage model also fixes some wage problems at the restaurant locations. Waiters and waitresses at Joe’s are usually against having help when it comes to a large table because it means splitting tips. Now, no matter how large the party, tip sharing will not be an issue at the 18 test cities.

Joe’s will continue testing this new model through the end of the year.

 

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

While Fast Food Protests Sweep the Country, Australia McDonald’s Pays $15 Per Hour

mcdonalds-sign-wage-protest

On Thursday, August 29th, low-wage employees gathered to the streets, demanding wages of $15 per hour, more than double the federal minimum wage of $7.25, and the ability to form unions. The protests went viral early today, spreading to 50 cities including, New York, Los Angeles, Detroit and Chicago — with throngs of employees working for large fast food chains walking out on their shifts.

It’s not livable,” Tyree Johnson told HuffPo. “I’ve been dedicated to McDonald’s for the past 21 years. I still make $8 an hour.”

Johnson’s story is one of many. “I’m tired of choosing between paying rent and eating,” Tamara Best-Watkins told the crowd outside the Rock N’ Roll McDonald’s in downtown Chicago. “I’m tired of choosing between taking my daughter out and paying rent.”

Officials in the restaurant industry warn that increased wages will hurt employees in the long run.

“Mandating increased wages would lead to higher prices for consumers, lower foot traffic and sales for franchise owners, and, ultimately, lost jobs and opportunities for employees to become managers or franchise owners,” Steve Caldeira, president and chief executive of the International Franchise Association, insisted in a statement. “The franchise industry is a proven job creator and career builder, yet efforts to double the minimum wage to $15 would clearly jeopardize opportunities for existing and prospective employees.”

While there is some truth to Caldeira’s words, he’s being a bit over-dramatic. Yes, US fast food chains would hurt, but only if wages were increased to $15 overnight. The key here would be to increase wages gradually while simultaneously creating a new business model. You need only to look at McDonald’s chains in Australia and France, where  full-time adult workers earn a minimum wage of $14.50 an hour and $12 an hour respectively, for an example of high wages and profits co-existing. Note that both country’s minimum wages and cost of living are significantly higher than the US’ and even these overseas models have their kinks.

In turn, franchises would have to hire fewer workers, create more efficient management and charge more for that beloved Whopper. But when it’s virtually impossible to live off the average salary of a fast food employee, this might just be the next necessary step.

H/T NRNThe Atlantic + PicThx Reuters