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Tastemade/Snapchat

13 Eggs You Had No Idea People Were Eating

We don’t always experiment in the kitchen. As a whole, we stick to what we know, and in the United States, we know eggs — chicken eggs, to be precise. Chicken and egg are synonymous here in America; so much so that we embrace it as our dominant age-old question, “What came first, the chicken or the egg?”

But there are other eggs to explore and experience. The average person might only have a range that begins with scrambled and ends with poached, but more curious chefs are out trying everything from croc to rhea. Let’s see all the kinds of eggs people are taking for a culinary spin.

Emu Egg

At first glance, an emu egg looks like a puzzling decorative piece in a rich person’s home that you do not understand and yet cannot stop examining. It’s a dark bluish green, like that of a Sedona hippie’s jewelry. A single emu egg weighs roughly two pounds, which could arguably be a dozen chicken eggs. In this YouTube video, user Sean Trank cracks open this sucker and unveils a massive omelette opportunity we could all easily share.

Ostrich Egg

If you were a child and came upon an ostrich egg, your default assumption would be that it’s a dinosaur egg. But no, the monstrous bird that is the ostrich is real and its eggs are enormous rounded white blocks of smooth ivory coloring. Given that an ostrich egg is typically around three pounds, you can either make the world’s biggest batch of potato salad or cook up an egg breakfast that could feed an entire diner. This YouTube video from theRandom123boy perfectly displays the enormity of an ostrich egg and the result is an omelette that can feed a family.

Crocodile Egg

It may not surprise you that eggs from these lurking, floating beasts can prove somewhat fishy, but that’s why people like to boil them. Crocodile eggs are certainly enjoyed in certain parts of Australia, though they’re likely a tougher breed of human altogether. Just don’t take the eggs from out in the wild. Crocs aren’t fans of a lot of things and they for sure hate that. For a super unique example of how folks can consume croc eggs, YouTube account SuperBlueTaurus posts this video that highlights an ice cream shop in the Philippines that infuses them in their ice cream. Chill move? You decide.

Rhea Egg

Rheas are a lesser known flightless bird that look just as suspicious as an ostrich or emu. A rhea egg is about two pounds and it has a rather intense exterior. If you soft-boil it, head’s up, it’s not easy. However, it does deliver a flavor that The Independent‘s Samuel Muston described as “more complex and daintier than a hen’s egg.” As cumbersome as it may seem to cook this egg, a YouTube vid from F4TCT gives a succinct how-to on handling it.

Ant Egg

Bet you weren’t expecting to see these on the list! It’s true though. Weaver ant eggs are notably high in protein and enjoyed throughout Southeast Asia. They make for a popular salad dish, especially in Laos and Thailand. Given that the ants snack on mango leaves, they can even be used as a substitute for lemon juice in some recipes. If your curiosity gets the best of you and you’re dying to try them, peep this video from YouTuber darrenb3, as he shows us how to make a Thai ant egg salad.

Quail Egg

Naturally, we assume only kings and queens eat quail eggs. They love ’em! Aside from pheasant, that’s all they really talk about eating in movies. In truth, quail eggs are enjoyed by all walks of life across the world, from being a hard-boiled topping for hamburgers or hot dogs in South American nations or as the Filipino street food kwek-kwek, which is basically deep-fried quail eggs on a skewer. In this YouTube video from My Money My Food, quail eggs are prominently featured in one village’s meal.

Turkey Egg

For a country whose most gluttonous holiday focuses on a roasted turkey, it’s curious how turkey eggs aren’t a regular staple of the modern American diet. This may have something to do with how rarely turkeys lay eggs, compared to a chicken. See, hens start laying eggs around five months and keep a quota going of nearly one a day. Meanwhile, turkeys start at about seven months and only lay an egg twice a week. Still, turkey eggs were more regularly consumed across the states, back when wild turkeys would roam through homesteads. YouTube user shadricosuave’s video shows a turkey egg’s distinct spotted appearance, making you think twice before cracking due to it’s appealing aesthetic.

Goose Egg

These might be more popular among Americans if Aesop’s Fables proved true and golden goose eggs were a thing. But alas, these are pretty standard, albeit with a rather dense yolk. While they’re also larger than chicken eggs, goose eggs can be cooked pretty much the same way. You just have to time it right. And you can make the fanciest omelette ever with goose eggs according to this video from Way Out West Blow-in blog.

Gull Egg

Dark dots cover the tan-brownish eggs of your friendly, local black-headed gull well, local if you’re in certain parts of Asia, Europe, or North America. Still, as they come from only one type of gull, these eggs are rather rare, available for a few weeks only right before summer starts. If you’re lucky enough to score a few, you’ll quickly notice that their yolks are more red-orange than you’re used to. You can see the brilliant hue of the yolk well in this video from YouTube account RollingDiaries.

Pheasant Egg

With a pale olive green color that looks like the walls of your stylish aunt and uncle’s remodeled bathroom, pheasant eggs are aesthetically pleasing from the start. Beyond that, they have a rich flavor and probably empower you to make bold decisions. Royalty snack food can sometimes do that to a person unprepared. YouTuber AlaskaGranny shows us just how to properly cook these pretty little eggs.

Turtle Egg

Typically smaller than a golf ball and sometimes more oblong than you’d expect, turtle eggs are a treat to some. The taste of a turtle egg is up for debate, however, with some finding it packed with more flavor than that of a chicken, while others consider the taste just a tad too curious. Its preparation varies, from a simple splash of soy sauce before sucking out the goods to battering them up and smoking them along with a side of barbecue sauce. Check out this video from thetuttletribe, where he shares all the deets on eating one of these tiny eggs on their own.

Duck Egg

A duck egg is only slightly bigger than a chicken egg, but its benefits are apparent to any chef or baker. WIth less water and more fat, duck eggs can be cooked the same as chicken eggs for the most part. Duck eggs arguably work as magic, by the way. With them subbed in, omelettes will be fluffier, cookies are chewier, and cakes rise better. For a more in-depth look into the comparison between duck and chicken eggs, YouTuber Christopher Ruzyla provides us with this informative vid.

Guinea Fowl Egg

You can come at these eggs like you do chicken eggs. Just remember that their shells are harder than what you’re likely used to. Their insides can also prove creamier with less egg white. Guinea Fowl eggs can be good in cakes and pies or enjoyed by themselves, given the handsome flavor profile. Heads up, though, these aren’t as plentiful and easy of a find as other eggs. Rainbow Gardens posted up this YouTube video wherein she shows us how to poach this rare egg.

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Tastemade/Snapchat

How To Save Your Food From These 14 Kitchen Errors

You’ve been slaving over the stove to make the perfect dish, and all you’ve got left to do is add that last pinch of salt, dash of hot sauce, or touch of sugar to make it divine. Of course, your body decides to have a klutz moment right then and there and bam! Your culinary masterpiece is ruined by a tragic error. Fortunately, you don’t have to toss everything out and start over, because you can save some dishes after the mistake happens. Here’s how to simply solve some of these kitchen nightmares and to keep them from ruining your meal.

Desalting an Oversalted Dish

If you’ve put too much salt into your food, you can increase the other flavor components to balance everything out or add some starch to draw the salt back out. That way, you won’t be left with a nasty feeling in your mouth afterwards.

Saving Greasy Sauces and Gravies

If you’ve got a layer of oil at the top of your sauce or gravy you want to get rid of, just add a cold steel dish to the gravy. The oil will stick to the steel after some time, meaning you can enjoy a grease-free dish with this swift life hack.

Toning Down A Meal That’s Too Spicy

Adding sugar, dairy, or more ingredients to help distribute and dilute the spiciness in food is a great way to tone down the heat. That way, you don’t have to blow your mouth off just to have lunch.

Thickening Sauces That Are Too Thin

There’s several ways to thicken sauces, whether it be through starches like cornstarch or arrowroot, or even through fats like butter or cheese. The simplest way, though is to reduce the sauce until enough water evaporates to create the consistency you’re looking for. Bon Appetit!

Rescuing Burnt Rice

While burnt rice may seem all but lost, you can save the part that isn’t scorched and get rid of the smell, too. Simply add some bread on top of the rice for a few minutes, and it’ll take in that flavor and leave your rice tasting fresh. Simple, yet extremely effective.

Saving A Broken Mayonnaise

When your mayonnaise splits, you may feel like it’s the end of the world and you have to start all over. However, through simple blending, water, and an egg yolk, your mayo will be back to full strength before you know it.

Keeping Treats From Getting Too Sweet

Sometimes, desserts can overload on the sugar to give you that cloying feel in your mouth that’s just awful. However, through acid, spice, diluting, or alternative sweeteners, you can change things up and keep yourself from feeling sickly when eating that special treat.

Unstick Your Sticky, Overcooked Noodles

We’ve all been there with the overcooked noodles, but we don’t have to eat them in sadness. Adding some cold water will help loosen things up and allow us to slurp at our leisure.

Rewhipping Overbeaten Whipped Cream

It can be difficult to tell when you’ve overworked homemade whipped cream, but if you’re in that conundrum, don’t panic. A simple addition of a little more cream to the bowl will allow you to rework and whip the cream back to where it should be, saving your decadent whipped delight.

Repair A Cracked Pie Crust

If your pie crust has cracked on you, you can repair it back together with some “glue.” In this case, that glue is a paste of flour and water that you can bake into the pie crust and keep everything together. If you’re a pie rookie, this is definitely a life-saver.

Removing Broken Eggshell Pieces

When that piece of eggshell gets into your cracked eggs, it can be a pain to try and drag it out. Fortunately, eggs come with a built-in solution to the problem, as the larger pieces of shell can easily remove the tiny broken bits inside. Now your eggs won’t be crunchy in the morning anymore.

Rehydrating Dried Poultry Meat

Chicken and turkey are both incredibly easy to overcook, making them taste dry. With some chicken stock and gravy, however, you can restore their moist texture and nobody will ever know that you messed up on the Thanksgiving turkey… again.

Fixing A Broken Buttercream Frosting


Buttercream frostings break because of temperature, and whether yours be too hot or too cold, there’s simple ways to revert the temperature back to where you need it to be. Once you do so, you’ll have the perfect frosting for cupcakes and more.

Smoothing Out Clumpy Chocolate Sauce

Chocolate sauces can seize up and go clumpy if cooked improperly, but there’s an easy save. Incorporating enough moisture to dissolve the clumps by adding water, cream, or another liquid gives you the second chance you need to make that smooth, glossy chocolate sauce everyone will be dying over.

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Now Trending Recipes

A Flamin’ Hot Cheetos Turkey Recipe Has Got The Internet Buzzing

In humanity’s continual quest to see how far we can push the limits of Flamin’ Hot Cheetos dishes, someone has finally added the spicy chips to the traditional Thanksgiving bird. We have now been blessed (or disgraced, depending on how you feel about it) with a Flamin’ Hot Cheetos turkey recipe.

In preparation for the upcoming holiday, tinfoil giant Reynolds released a trio of chip-topped recipes for the typical Thanksgiving centerpiece. Apart from Flamin’ Hot Cheetos, which are referred to as “hot puffed cheese sticks,” there are also turkey prep methods involving Cool Ranch Doritos and Funyuns.

Of course, everyone jumped at the Hot Cheetos version, because the internet always goes berserk when people smother them on top of anything edible. Not everyone was on board with this turkey, however. When asked for thoughts about Reynolds’s creation, Foodbeast’s Isai Rocha had this to say:

“I hope that turkey burns in hell. Flamin’ Hot Cheetos hell.”

An onslaught of Twitter reactions that followed Reynolds’ gimmicky recipe also mocked its existence.

While normally, Flamin’ Hot Cheetos creations are dishes the internet flips for, these reactions to this Hot Cheetos turkey recipe signal that the trend may have gone a little too far this time. However, for hardcore Flamin’ Hot Cheetos fans, the fiery Thanksgiving twist could be worth a shot.

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Animals

Turkey Tails Are The Best Part Of The Bird You’ve Never Had

The strange story of turkey tails speaks volumes about our globalized food system

File 20171108 14182 18ak4eh.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1Headed for export?
Ryan McDonough, CC BY
Michael Carolan, Colorado State University

Intensive livestock farming is a huge global industry that serves up millions of tons of beef, pork and poultry every year. When I asked one producer recently to name something his industry thinks about that consumers don’t, he replied, “Beaks and butts.” This was his shorthand for animal parts that consumers – especially in wealthy nations – don’t choose to eat.

On Thanksgiving, turkeys will adorn close to 90 percent of U.S. dinner tables. But one part of the bird never makes it to the groaning board, or even to the giblet bag: the tail. The fate of this fatty chunk of meat shows us the bizarre inner workings of our global food system, where eating more of one food produces less-desirable cuts and parts. This then creates demand elsewhere – so successfully in some instances that the foreign part becomes, over time, a national delicacy.

Spare parts

Industrial-scale livestock production evolved after Word War II, supported by scientific advances such as antibiotics, growth hormones and, in the case of the turkey, artificial insemination. (The bigger the tom, the harder it is for him to do what he’s supposed to do: procreate.)

U.S. commercial turkey production increased from 16 million pounds in January 1960 to 500 million pounds in January 2017. Total production this year is projected at 245 million birds.

That includes a quarter-billion turkey tails, also known as the parson’s nose, pope’s nose or sultan’s nose. The tail is actually a gland that attaches the turkey’s feathers to its body. It is filled with oil that the bird uses to preen itself, so about 75 percent of its calories come from fat.

Ready to eat.
Mark Turnauckas, CC BY

It’s not clear why turkeys arrive at U.S. stores tailless. Industry insiders have suggested to me that it may simply have been an economic decision. Turkey consumption was a novelty for most consumers before World War II, so few developed a taste for the tail, although the curious can find recipes online. Turkeys have become larger, averaging around 30 pounds today compared to 13 pounds in the 1930s. We’ve also been breeding for breast size, due to the American love affair with white meat: One prized early big-breasted variety was called Bronze Mae West. Yet the tail remains.

Savored in Samoa

Rather than letting turkey tails go to waste, the poultry industry saw a business opportunity. The target: Pacific Island communities, where animal protein was scarce. In the 1950s U.S. poultry firms began dumping turkey tails, along with chicken backs, into markets in Samoa. (Not to be outdone, New Zealand and Australia exported “mutton flaps,” also known as sheep bellies, to the Pacific Islands.) With this strategy, the turkey industry turned waste into gold.

By 2007 the average Samoan was consuming more than 44 pounds of turkey tails every year – a food that had been unknown there less than a century earlier. That’s nearly triple Americans’ annual per capita turkey consumption.

When I interviewed Samoans recently for my book “No One Eats Alone: Food as a Social Enterprise,” it was immediately clear that some considered this once-foreign food part of their island’s national cuisine. When I asked them to list popular “Samoan foods,” multiple people mentioned turkey tails – frequently washed down with a cold Budweiser.

American Samoa is a U.S. territory covering seven islands in the South Pacific.
National Park Service

How did imported turkey tails become a favorite among Samoa’s working class? Here lies a lesson for health educators: The tastes of iconic foods cannot be separated from the environments in which they are eaten. The more convivial the atmosphere, the more likely people will be to have positive associations with the food.

Food companies have known this for generations. It’s why Coca-Cola has been ubiquitous in baseball parks for more than a century, and why many McDonald’s have PlayPlaces. It also explains our attachment to turkey and other classics at Thanksgiving. The holidays can be stressful, but they also are a lot of fun.

As Julia, a 20-something Samoan, explained to me, “You have to understand that we eat turkey tails at home with family. It’s a social food, not something you’ll eat when you’re alone.”

Turkey tails also come up in discussions of the health epidemic gripping these islands. American Samoa has an obesity rate of 75 percent. Samoan officials grew so concerned that they banned turkey tail imports in 2007.

But asking Samoans to abandon this cherished food overlooked its deep social attachments. Moreover, under World Trade Organization rules, countries and territories generally cannot unilaterally ban the import of commodities unless there are proven public health reasons for doing so. Samoa was forced to lift its ban in 2013 as a condition of joining the WTO, notwithstanding its health worries.

Author Michael Carolan cooks turkey tails for the first time.

Embracing the whole animal

If Americans were more interested in eating turkey tails, some of our supply might stay at home. Can we bring back so called nose-to-tail animal consumption? This trend has been gaining some ground in the United States, but mainly in a narrow foodie niche.

Beyond Americans’ general squeamishness toward offal and tails, we have a knowledge problem. Who even knows how to carve a turkey anymore? Challenging diners to select, prepare and eat whole animals is a pretty big ask.

Oxtails were a popular Depression-era meat cut in the United States, but now are found more frequently in Asian cuisine; shown here, oxtail soup at a Chinese restaurant in Los Angeles.
T. Tseng, CC BY

Google’s digitization of old cookbooks shows us that it wasn’t always so. “The American Home Cook Book,” published in 1864, instructs readers when choosing lamb to “observe the neck vein in the fore quarter, which should be of an azure-blue to denote quality and sweetness.” Or when selecting venison, “pass a knife along the bones of the haunches of the shoulders; if it smell [sic] sweet, the meat is new and good; if tainted, the fleshy parts of the side will look discolored, and the darker in proportion to its staleness.” Clearly, our ancestors knew food very differently than we do today.

It is not that we don’t know how to judge quality anymore. But the yardstick we use is calibrated – intentionally, as I’ve learned – against a different standard. The modern industrial food system has trained consumers to prioritize quantity and convenience, and to judge freshness based on sell-by-date stickers. Food that is processed and sold in convenient portions takes a lot of the thinking process out of eating.

The ConversationIf this picture is bothersome, think about taking steps to recalibrate that yardstick. Maybe add a few heirloom ingredients to beloved holiday dishes and talk about what makes them special, perhaps while showing the kids how to judge a fruit or vegetable’s ripeness. Or even roast some turkey tails.

Michael Carolan, Professor of Sociology and Associate Dean for Research, College of Liberal Arts, Colorado State University
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.
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Hit-Or-Miss Packaged Food

Pringles Just Made An Entire Thanksgiving Dinner In Chip Form


Photo by Isai Rocha/Foodbeast

Pringles isn’t scared to play around with new flavor concepts, and this year, they put together an entire Thanksgiving meal’s worth of flavors in one package.

With eight different familiar flavors, Pringles’ Thanksgiving Dinner consists of turkey, mashed potato, stuffing, mac & cheese, creamed corn, green bean casserole, cranberry sauce, and pumpkin pie.

Each pack comes with three of each flavor, and it’s even in a container that sort of looks like a baking pan, just to add to the home kitchen feel.

While they sent us a package and got us all excited for its release, it looks like they’re only testing the product, as of now, and won’t be available in retail stores this year.

Womp womp.

Still, in case they ever do release these all at once, or individually, we went ahead and tried them for you.

With so many flavors, they’re weren’t all hits, but there are a lot of good flavors in this dinner — just depends what you’re into.


Photo Courtesy of Pringles

HITS

There are the flavors that we generally thought were pretty good.

Turkey

Let’s start with the main course. The turkey flavor actually has a near identical flavor. Well, at least a very gravy like taste, and we’re not mad. As the crew around the Foodbeast office tried it, the reviews were fairly positive. At least they didn’t mess up the main dish.
__________

Creamed Corn

This one was our managing editor Reach Guinto’s favorite, and it had an interesting dynamic as it was savory, but also had a hint of sweetness to it. I personally liked it as well, but also think it might not be for everyone, as it’s not flavor comparable to anything before it, and might take some getting used to if it were a standalone. Plus points go to capturing the buttery flavor.
__________

Stuffing

The stuffing might be the best flavor of the bunch, and would definitely be a banger as a standalone flavor. A lot of eyes in the office lit up when trying the stuffing-flavored chip. It really did taste like stuffing which can really fuck with you mentally coming from a Pringle crisp.


Photo by Isai Rocha/Foodbeast

MEH

__________

Pumpkin Pie

This one was hit-or-miss, but if you’re a fan of pumpkin everything, you’d probably enjoy it. The pumpkin flavor wasn’t too overwhelming, but it’s probably not a chip you’d keep reaching for. It’s just kind of good.
__________

Mashed Potato

Rudy Cheney of our dev team put it best, as he said, “It tastes like a potato chip,” which makes sense, since it’s potato flavor. “It tastes like an unflavored Pringle.” This one wasn’t good or bad, it was just there.
__________

Cranberry Sauce

“It screams fruity, but it doesn’t taste like cranberry,” said our resident food scientist Constantine Spyrou. There were hints of some kind of fruit, but for the most part, there wasn’t a lot of flavor to it.
__________


Photo Courtesy of Pringles

GTFO

Mac & Cheese

“Whoa, this one kind of smells like butt,” another classic quote from our own Rudy Cheney, and yeah, it wasn’t the best smelling or tasting of the bunch. It literally tasted like uncooked Kraft mac & cheese powder.
__________

Green Bean Casserole

It tasted like they just dusted the chip with onion powder. If you were to take plain Pringles and add your own onion powder to it, it’d probably taste like this green bean casserole. It’s like a real green bean casserole in the sense that you look at it and say, “Why am I gonna eat veggies for thanksgiving?” Hard pass.

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Products

We May Just Wear Stove Top’s Thanksgiving Dinner Pants All Year

Thanksgiving is less than two weeks out and we’re doing everything we can to ensure we enjoy the much-anticapted family dinner. One of our biggest conundrums, however, is how tight our pants get after we enjoy the first few servings of dinner.

Fortunately, Stove Top might just have the solution to this uncomfortable dilemma.

The stuffing brand has released their own line of Thanksgiving Dinner Pants just ahead of Turkey Day. Stove Top’s maroon dinner pants feature an over the belly waistband, stuffing print, and extra large pockets. Checks off pretty much all our requirements for pants.

You can purchase the pants beginning Nov. 13 for a limited time at ThanksgivingDinnerPants.com for $19.98. The pants are available in sizes from small to extra-large.

Looks like old Pete won’t be needing a belt this year.

Stove Top is also donating $10,000 to Feeding America in the spirit of the holiday season.

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Fast Food

Subway Brings Back Popular REUBEN Sandwich

Last year, Subway introduced a Reuben to their sandwich lineup for a limited time. Sure, it wasn’t as good as something you’d find in an authentic deli, but it was a pretty fantastic attempt for a fast food chain. Especially if you need a quick fix to curb those reuben cravings.

To capitalize on the sandwich’s popularity last go around, Subway is bringing back the reuben this year for a limited time, reports Brand Eating.

The sandwich boasts slices of tender corned beef, sauerkraut, Thousand Island sauce, and Swiss Cheese. It’s served on loaf of toasted rye bread.

As with every other sandwich at Subway, you can customize it with any breads or cheeses available. Patrons can also order a Turkey Reuben that replaces the corned beef with slices of roast turkey.

You can find the reuben sandwiches available at participating Subway locations. They’ll likely stick around through the end of the month.

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FOODBEAST

Entire Thanksgiving Dinner As Ice Cream Will Satisfy The Kid In All Of Us

Our childhood dreams of having dessert for dinner has come true, thanks to the culinary magicians at Salt & Straw.

From November 1-22, you can experience a full Thanksgiving dinner in the form of decadent ice cream at Salt & Straw’s locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Portland.

It’s a little mind-boggling to imagine savory dishes (like TURKEY) transformed into a sweet treat, but before you knock it, take a look at the website descriptions of the five new flavors Salt & Straw is offering for the “Thanksgiving Dinner of Ice Cream”.

Sweet Potato Casserole With Maple Pecans

We roast sweet potatoes down and mix them with cream and sugar to make a sweet, spicy, sticky ice cream. Then we mix in Oregon pecans caramelized with maple sugar. And then of course you have to add some marshmallow, so we top it off with hand-churned ribbons of our own delicious homemade gooey maple fluff.

Buttered Mashed Potatoes & Gravy

We’ve made over 600 different flavors of ice cream, and this is hands-down the most savory one we’ve ever served. We make a potato-flavored ice cream, thanks to the real potatoes we boil down until the starch turns to sugar, and then stir in our own homemade gravy fudge made from two mashed-up recipes, pun very much intended. The result is a super-dense, super-creamy ice cream that tastes sweet and salty with hints of chocolate, coffee and yes, baked mashed potato.

Persimmon Walnut Stuffing

Our stuffing course tastes like a warm spice cake, thanks to the chopped-up pieces of homemade toasted stuffing made with walnuts and bourbon raisins we add to a savory spiced ice cream. Why yes that is olive oil, salt, pepper and coriander, how insightful of your taste buds to notice. And for a sweet finish, we add roasted persimmons, made with fruit grown locally at Apricot Farms.

Spiced Goat Cheese & Pumpkin Pie

What makes pumpkin pie so delicious? We think it’s the creaminess of the custardy filling. So we challenged ourselves to figure out how to make this ice cream taste just like that. We start with goat-cheese ice cream, which we sprinkle with pumpkin pie spices, but the generous helping of mashed pumpkin we fold and swirl in really steals the show. If there were ever an ice cream that actually warms your face, this is the one. It’s the perfect end to a Thanksgiving meal of ice cream.

…and the pièce de résistance…

Salted Caramel Thanksgiving Turkey

It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without turkey, but how exactly do we make it into deliciously salty, creamy ice cream? Two ways! We cook turkey stock mixed with sugar, spices and onions down until it bubbles into a caramel, which creates the base of the salted caramel ice cream.  And we also roast turkey skin until it’s crispy and then candy-coat it and mix bits of that in, too. So you could almost call this Double Salted Caramel Thanksgiving Turkey.

Sounds irresistible now, doesn’t it?

Don’t fret if you don’t live near a Salt & Straw, as you’re able to order all the pints your heart desires and have them delivered in time for the holidays. It’ll be like having Thanksgiving dinner twice with just one food coma!