Categories
Food Trends News Products Test Kitchen What's New

Hardee’s Has A New Seasonal Meal Called Thanksgiving In A Box

Thanksgiving is a hop, skip, and a jump around the corner and Hardee’s has a fresh take on the traditional meal. They’re calling it Hardee’s Thanksgiving In A Box and it’s their first ever seasonal meal. It marries the franchise’s quality approach with familiar holiday flavors. Each Thanksgiving In A Box includes Stuffing Chicken Tenders, Sweet Potato Waffle Fries, Toasted Onion Green Beans and Savory Chicken Gravy. 

The Stuffing Chicken Tenders are a 100% all-white meat chicken, hand-breaded with sage and herb stuffing. It’s meant to pair well with the new Savory Chicken Gravy. The other two box-items are the Sweet Potato Waffle Fries, tossed in sweet waffle batter and fried up, and Toasted Onion Coated Green Beans, which is a spin on green bean casserole. At only $6.99, this could be the perfect Friendsgiving chip-in. 

A recent study by Hardee’s revealed a desire by Americans to break from traditional Thanksgiving dinners. I’d imagine the plant-based revolution, rise in foodie culture, and cultural crossover from the internet are factors. Reportedly, over 64% of Americans would love an alternative to the standard turkey, and 53% are hoping for new side dishes this year. 

Hardee’s will be testing out the new holiday flavors at participating restaurants in Jacksonville, FL starting November 13, 2019 – December 3, 2019, while supplies last. If you’re in the area, rather than slave over the stove, you can now suggest Thanksgiving In A Box for dinner.

Categories
#foodbeast Brand Cravings FOODBEAST Grocery Hacks Recipes SPONSORED

Thanksgiving Leftover Arepas Let You Relive The Turkey Day Magic

After Thanksgiving, there’s always a massive pile of festive leftovers in the fridge you eat through for the next few days. You can get pretty creative with these recalentados, including this arepa that elevates the standard Thanksgiving leftovers sandwich to new heights.

Made with a quick homemade arepa you can prepare within minutes, this sandwich also gets a spicy and savory kick with the addition of bacon, Havarti cheese, and jalapeños. Combined with all of your recalentados, this makes for a hefty, hearty sandwich that’ll have you eating through the entire stock of turkey and mashed potatoes in no time at all.

You can find all of the ingredients needed on top of your leftovers for this arepa at Northgate Market. Northgate Market also has a holiday cookbook coming out that puts twists on the Thanksgiving classics as well, including a mole-sauced turkey that would make for a tasty addition to this sandwich.

If you want to make this mouthwatering arepa, peep the recipe below.

Servings: 2

Ingredients
For the arepas
1 cup P.A.N. pre-cooked white cornmeal
½ tsp salt
1 cup lukewarm water
2-4 Tbsp Pompeian Safflower oil (Enough to cover bottom of the frying pan)
For the filling
1/2 cup leftover mashed potatoes
1.2 cup leftover stuffing
1-2 cups leftover turkey meat
3-4 Tbsp cranberry sauce
4 slices bacon, cooked until crispy
4 slices Havarti cheese
¼ cup fresh jalapeño slices
1/2 cup leftover gravy, warm

Directions

Step 1
In a medium bowl, combine cornmeal, water and salt. Knead dough a few times in a bowl, then divide into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a ball, then gently flatten to 4 inch discs.

Step 2
Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Cook arepas in oil until golden brown, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Transfer cooked arepas to a paper towel-lined plate to drain until cool, about 5 minutes. Carefully slit arepas halfway and transfer to a lined baking sheet.

Step 3
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. To assemble, lay 2 slices of arepa and top in this order: 1/4 cup mashed potatoes, 2 slices cheese, jalapeño slices to taste and 1/4 cup of stuffing.

Step 4
Bake in the oven for 5 minutes to melt cheese. Include the remaining 2 arepa slices to get extra crispy.

Step 5
Finish by distributing the turkey between all cheese topped arepas, followed by cooked bacon.
Smear cranberry sauce on the 2 plain slices. Place cranberry side down and top arepas. Serve with a side of gravy for dipping and enjoy!


Created in partnership with Northgate Market

Categories
Hacks Kitchen Gadgets Now Trending Recipes

According To Butterball, You CAN Actually Microwave A Whole Turkey

This Thanksgiving season, there’s been a viral prank going around that encourages folks to text their moms asking how to microwave a 25-pound turkey. While it’s elicited some pretty funny WTF reactions that people have posted online, turns out there actually IS a way to cook the whole bird in the microwave, and it could save you a bit of time.

Butterball went on the record with TODAY Food to explain exactly how it was possible. While they recommend against it for anything over 12 pounds based on health and safety reasons, smaller birds can cook in about 2 hours time using the microwave oven properly. These are the steps they recommended:

  1. Thaw the turkey out first to room temperature, then place breast-side down in a microwave-safe dish or plate.
  2. Microwaving will happen in two stages. The first part will be at full power, for 4 minutes per pound. So, if you have a 10-pound turkey, it will take 40 minutes.
  3. Set your microwave down to half power, remove the drippings from the plate, and turn the turkey back over. Baste the skin, then microwave for 8 minutes per pound. Make sure to baste every 18 minutes, taking the turkey’s temperature in the thigh and the breast each time.
  4. When the turkey thigh reaches an internal temperature of 180-185 degrees F and the breast is at 170-175 degrees F, the turkey is done. Baste once more, then serve.

Based on these instructions, the total cooking time for a 10-pound turkey would be 2 hours, not counting time needed to baste and thaw out the bird. If you were to do it an oven, FoodSafety.gov recommends about 3 hours for a similar turkey (unstuffed), so you’d save a significant amount of time using the microwave.

To make sure that the Butterball hotline wasn’t pulling the wool over our eyes on this one, we reached out to them West Wing-style, noting that we were interested in cooking a turkey in the microwave. This is the response we got:

“Butterball has not tested cooking directions over anything larger than 12 pounds. We recommend following the microwave’s manufacturer’s directions. Just make sure your thigh reaches an internal temperature of 180 degrees F and your breast reaches an internal temperature of 170 degrees F.”

“Microwaving a turkey under 12 lbs is an option but there are many steps. Call or email for complete directions.”

E-mailing a request for complete directions for a 10-pound turkey yielded the following recipe, which is pretty similar to the one Butterball gave to TODAY:

Many microwaves have small interiors and carousels, be sure turkey and tray fit.  Begin by evenly stabilizing turkey, breast down, with microwave-safe item, in microwave-safe dish.

To cook, follow these steps 3 to 4 times:

1) Brush back of turkey with one tablespoon of Browning Sauce*.
2) Microwave at high power for 4 minutes per pound. If no turntable, rotate at 2 minutes.
3) Remove and discard drippings (remove so microwave energy remains on turkey; discard they are partially cooked and therefore unsafe to consume).
4) Turn turkey breast up (protect fingers with paper towels).  Brush breast with one tablespoon of Browning Sauce*.
5) Microwave at medium power for 8 minutes per pound.
6) Remove and discard drippings.

After third interval, check temperatures.  If all parts not up to temperature, microwave for fourth interval and recheck temperatures to ensure breast is at 165 degrees F and thigh is at 180 degrees. F.  Cover cooked turkey with foil and let stand for 15-20 minutes before carving.

* BROWNING SAUCE:  1/2 stick butter (1/4 cup); 1/4 teaspoon paprika; 1/8 teaspoon Kitchen Bouquet or Gravy Master

While the 25-pound turkey everyone is pranking their moms with isn’t a real microwave option, know that if you are in a time crunch and have a smaller bird, using the appliance might be a real option to cooking the bird faster.

Categories
Culture Features Hacks Restaurants

10 Pro Chefs Reveal What They Do With Their Thanksgiving Leftovers

Thanksgiving is right around the corner, and while everyone’s planning what to cook for dinner, I’m trying to figure out what to do with the inevitable leftovers that come with a large family that refuses to take food home. Usually there will be Tupperware containers stacked with stuffing, mashed potatoes, mac and cheese, ham, and veggies sitting in my fridge that last well into Cyber Monday.

My go-to move is to plop everything onto a plate and introduce it to Mister Microwave. Lazy, yes, but it gets the job done. This year, I told myself I’d put a little more effort into my leftovers and was left wondering what professional chefs do with their extra holiday food the day after Turkey Day.

Photo courtesy of Josh Elkin

These ten professional chefs from across the country reveal their unique takes on tackling Thanksgiving leftovers. Check out what they have to say.


Jason Fullilove (Barbara Jean)

Photo courtesy of Peter Pham

“I like to make a Thanksgiving leftover pot pie with a simple 3-2-1 pie dough!” chef Fullilove shares.

Carmine Di Giovanni (Aunt Jake’s)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Chef Carmine Di Giovanni (@chef_carmine) on

“I love to whip up chili with my leftover turkey and vegetables, and then make croutons from the stuffing,” gushes Chef Di Giovanni. “It’s easy to make with everything that’s still in your fridge and doesn’t take a ton of time to put together. It’s also perfect for dinner the day after Thanksgiving and you still have family staying at your house.”

Molly Martin and Lyndi Stein (Juniper Green)

Photo courtesy of Hannah Schneider Creative

“We love to make a simple curry with leftover vegetables,” the culinary duo explain. “We usually have Brussel sprouts, cauliflower, roasted root vegetables, and maybe a spare onion and potato left. Fry up some sliced garlic, onion and ginger if you have it, then add red or green Thai curry paste, a little turkey stock (or even water), and a can or two of coconut milk.”

They add:

“If you have a can of chickpeas lying around, throw it in. Simmer your leftover veg in it just until it’s all warmed through and has a chance to marry and adjust the seasoning. We serve it over rice with lime wedges and cilantro for a comforting bowl that won’t leave you feeling like you need another nap.”

Linh Nguyen (Fleenor’s on 4th)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Chef Linh Nguyen (@cheflinhnguyen) on

“I like to make savory bread pudding out of the leftover stuffing, shred up some turkey and add gravy plus a couple fried eggs,” chef Nguyen says. “I call it my Thanksgiving Loco Moco!”

Jake Strang (L27)

Courtesy of Hannah Schneider Creative

“I like to take the dressing (or stuffing) and patty it out,” says Chef Strang. “You get a non-stick pan with a little butter and fry the patties until crispy. Then top with turkey that’s heated up in gravy until it shreds apart. Dump that over the top the crispy stuffing, top with a dollop of cranberry sauce and, if you’re feeling particularly healthy, some leftover green beans that have been slightly overcooked. It’s heaven!”

Greg Biggers (Fort Louise)

Photo courtesy Derek Richmond

“First of all, the [Thanksgiving] sandwich requires sturdy bread but not chewy,” chef Biggers explains. “A well baked, large toasted brioche bun is my go-to. Next, the most important ingredient (surprisingly not the turkey) is the stuffing! I like to make a patty out of it similar to a crab cake then sear it off. Now, you can add everything else left from the table you can find; turkey, cranberry sauce, mayo, coleslaw, and top it off with a side dish of gravy to dip it in.”

Josh Elkin (@thejoshelkin)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Josh Elkin (@thejoshelkin) on

“It changes every year, which is the fun part,” the YouTube celebrity chef shared excitedly. “Last year I made a leftover shooter sandwich. It’s a pressed sandwich packing in as much ingredients as I can fit. Weighing it down for a day and covering it in gravy. This year, I’m making a taco with a stuffing taco shell. It’s gonna be dumb smart. “

Nick Korbee (Egg Shop)

Photo courtesy of Hannah Schneider Creative

“Top a slice of bread with gravy, turkey, bacon and a tomato then broil away. When the bacon is crisp, and the gravy is bubbly, top this sandwich with a sunny up egg and enjoy!” Korbee instructs. “The prep for this classic sandwich can even be done while clearing the table. Build it on a cookie sheet and store in the fridge for an easy breakfast the next morning and save both time and Tupperware. If you’re feeling extra festive, substitute the tomato for cranberries for a little extra tang.”

Ed McFarland (Ed’s Lobster Bar)

Photo courtesy Hannah Schneider Creative

“I make Thanksgiving leftover meatballs,” McFarland dishes. “I grind the turkey, mix it with the stuffing and the cranberry sauce, form them into meatballs and heat it up in the turkey gravy. I like to do this because I use all the leftovers and every bite is the full taste of the Thanksgiving menu.”

Darryl Harmon (Clinton Hall)

Photo courtesy of Clinton Hall

“I take leftover pulled turkey, heat it up in the gravy with stuffing, cranberry sauce, baked apples and any vegetables I have from the day before,” offered Chef Harmon. “Then I take mashed potatoes and form into round mounds, add a dusting of flour (optional), and sear them on a griddle to make potato pancakes. Put the meat mixture in between and you have an amazing sandwich. Some people are weird about eating leftovers, but this twist is a fun, fresh take that my friends and family all love.”

Categories
#foodbeast Brand FOODBEAST Recipes SPONSORED

Sweet And Savory Mole Dulce Turkey Will Impress Your Thanksgiving Guests

Thanksgiving is the time to enjoy some traditional season favorites. There’s the turkey, cranberries, mashed potatoes, gravy… and of course, a heaping basket full of abuela’s tamales.

While Thanksgiving may not be a Mexican holiday, it has integrated itself into Chicano culture, and this turkey is the epitomization of that fusion.

Made with Doña Maria Mole Original, this turkey comes with a depth of aromas and flavors your standard Thanksgiving bird is missing. It’s perfect to bridge together the sides of tamales and mashed potatoes that are sure to come with the annual tradition.

Everyone will be fighting for the two legs with the flavors going on in this bird. And even when the big holiday is all said and done, the leftover meat is going to make for some incredible recalentados.

This twist on a Thanksgiving turkey will be featured in Northgate Market’s upcoming holiday cookbook. But if you’re wanting to do a practice run or two before then, you can view the recipe, whose ingredients can also all be found at Northgate Market, below.

Ingredients

For the turkey
1 (13-pound) turkey, thawed, neck and giblets removed
8 tbsp (1 stick) unsalted butter, divided
10 cloves garlic, peeled
2 ribs celery, chopped
3 medium carrots, chopped
1/2 white onion, quartered
1 navel orange, quartered
Salt & pepper

For the Mole sauce
1 (16.75 oz) jar Doña Maria Mole Original
32 ounces turkey stock
6 ounces Mexican-style chocolate
1/2 yellow onion, roughly chopped
5 large garlic cloves, peeled
1 cinnamon stick
1 (15-oz) can whole roasted Roma tomatoes, strained
3 tablespoons raw shelled peanuts
3 tablespoons raisins
1 tablespoon pumpkin seeds
4 tablespoons sesame seeds, divided
2 whole cloves
1/4 teaspoon anise seeds
1/4 teaspoon coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1/8 teaspoon dried thyme
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano

For garnish
Fresh thyme
Fresh rosemary
Fresh oregano
Small navel oranges
Lemons

Directions

Step 1

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Place turkey in a large roasting pan, and season inside the cavity with salt and pepper. Stuff the cavity with 4 tablespoons butter, garlic, celery, carrots, onion, and orange. Rub the remaining butter on the skin of the turkey on the outside, then season the skin with salt and pepper. Roast for about an hour until skin is golden brown.

Step 2

While the turkey is cooking, add the mole paste into a large stock pot over medium-high heat. Add turkey stock, chocolate, onion, garlic, and cinnamon. Bring everything to a boil and stir frequently to melt the mole paste and chocolate. Cook for about 20 minutes, until the mole paste and chocolate has dissolved. Remove from the heat, then fish out the cinnamon stick.

Step 3

Pour your mole sauce into the blender, and add the remaining ingredients for the sauce. This includes tomatoes, peanuts, raisins, pumpkin seeds, 2 tablespoons of sesame seeds, cloves, anise, coriander, peppercorns, allspice, thyme, and oregano. Blend on low, as the liquid will be hot. Once all the ingredients are mixed, turn the speed to medium/high and continue to blend to a puree.

Step 4
Push the liquid mole sauce through a sieve into a large bowl. The sauce consistency should be velvety and yet thick enough to slowly run off a back of a spoon. Reserve 2-3 cups of mole sauce to serve with the turkey on the side, but use some to baste the turkey.

Step 5

Pour mole sauce over the turkey. Reduce oven temperature to 350° degrees and continue to cook, basting every 30 minutes for an additional two hours or until an internal temperature of 165 degrees is reached.

Step 6
Transfer turkey to a cutting board and allow to rest. Carve the turkey, and serve with spoonfuls of heated mole sauce and a sprinkle of sesame seeds.


Created in partnership with Northgate Gonzalez Markets.

Categories
Animals Recipes

Your Early Guide On How To Deep Fry The Thanksgiving Turkey

Photo: Shutterstock // LaVonna Moore

Looking for a tender turkey that’s ready in a fraction of the time? You might need to deep fry your turkey this year!

Every year, Thanksgiving at my house is the same: Try to cram a huge turkey, a ton of side dishes and a few too many cooks in the kitchen. It’s practically a recipe for a hilarious holiday rom-com! This year, we might try something different. You’ve probably heard about deep fried turkey, right? To make the perfect bird, you’ll just need a few pieces of specialty equipment and the desire to follow safety instructions.

Safety First

Before we get started, we really want to stress that deep frying a turkey is not without risk. As a former restaurant chef, I can tell you first-hand that hot oil burns fast and hot. Before you decide to deep fry your turkey, make sure you’re ready to be safe and responsible. That means no drinking and frying! Start by actually reading the manufacturer’s manual that came with your deep fryer (yes, the whole thing). You should also read through the process before getting started so you fully understand every step before jumping in.

How to Make a Deep Fried Turkey

You’ll Need:

  • A turkey
  • An outdoor turkey-frying kit, including a propane tank, a burner, a large 30-quart pot, a deep frying thermometer and a hook/lowering mechanism
  • An instant read meat thermometer
  • A fire extinguisher that’s rated to work with grease fires (just in case!)

A quick note about deep fryers: We recommend buying a turkey fryer kit, like the popular Bayou Classic. This will ensure that you have everything you need for a successful run.

Instructions

Step 1: Size up your turkey

If your turkey is 14 pounds or less, you can go ahead and deep fry it whole. But, if it’s larger than 14 pounds, you’ll need to remove the legs and thighs from the body and fry them separately. Don’t be afraid to ask your local butcher to help you with that!

Step 2: Choose the right spot

Set up your turkey fryer on a flat surface (such as concrete) in an open area. You want the fryer to be far away from any other combustible materials, such as wooden decks, structures or furniture. Make sure that no one will need to walk between the propane tank and the burner, which could cause the pot of hot oil to fall over. Set your fire extinguisher nearby.

Step 3: Measure the oil

Overflowing the pot is the number one most dangerous aspect of deep frying a turkey. There’s no way to fix things when the oil is already heated up, so you’ll want to pre-measure your oil line. Place the turkey in the pot and add water until it’s covered by about a half an inch. Remove the turkey and allow any excess water to drain back into the pot. Mark the water line as the maximum fill line before discarding the water. Make sure there is at least 3 to 5 inches from the fill line to the top of the pot to prevent a boil over.

Step 4: Make sure everything is dry

Oil and water don’t exactly get along, and that’s especially true when the oil gets hot. Any water in the fryer will spit out at you as the turkey fries, which could cause a fire hazard or bodily harm. After you’ve measured the maximum fill line, pat the turkey dry with paper towels and fully dry the inside and outside of the pot. Check the turkey’s cavity to make sure it’s dry and free from ice.

Step 5: Prepare the oil

Once you’re ready to fry, fill the pot with oil, being careful not to exceed the maximum fill line. Clip the thermometer onto the side of the pot and turn on the burner. Heat the oil to 375°F. If you’re cooking turkey parts instead of a whole turkey, you only need to heat the oil to 325°F.

Step 6: Slowly lower the turkey

When the oil is good and hot, you’re ready to add the turkey! Hook the turkey with the provided hanger. Make sure you hooked it good: You should be able to hold the turkey securely over the cutting board without it slipping or falling. Turn the burner off and slowly lower the turkey into the pot, going slow enough to prevent the oil from bubbling over. Easing it in nice and slowly also allows you the chance to abort if anything goes amiss.

Pro Tip: You should definitely be wearing heavy-duty oven mitts for this step, along with pants and shoes. This isn’t the best activity for shorts and sandals! You want as little exposed skin as possible to reduce your chances of getting burned.

Step 7: Cook the turkey

Turn the burner back on and set your timer. The turkey cooks incredibly quickly using this method, about 3 to 4 minutes per pound (or 4 to 5 minutes a pound if cooking turkey parts). When the timer goes off, very carefully lift the turkey out of the oil and take the temperature with an instant-read meat thermometer. The deepest part of the thigh should register 175°F and the breast meat should read 165°F.

Step 8: Let it rest

Once the turkey is cooked, carefully remove it from the oil and place it on a rimmed baking sheet fitted with a wire rack (or, paper towels, if you prefer). Let the turkey rest for at least 20 minutes before cutting into it.

Now that you know the delight that is deep-fried turkey, you may never go back! Serve it up with your favorite side dishes and (of course) Grandma’s best gravy.

Related Links:


Article by Lindsay D. Mattison for Taste of Home. View the original article here.

Categories
#foodbeast Cravings Features

Foodbeast Guide To 2018’s OC Fair Food

While I shed a tear for the beach bod I never really got this summer, I take solace in the fact that it’s fair season and I can just try again in the fall.

Yes, that means we’re ready to be buried in fried foods, sweets, and snacks, not unlike that kid from Kazaam.

On Friday, June 13, the Orange County Fair opened its gates to the public and we eagerly high-tailed it into the fairgrounds.

Returning are some all-star vendors like Chicken Charlie’s and Biggy’s — the Deep Fry King and Sultan of Turkey Legs, respectively, and they’ve added a handful of new items that had us wiping drool from our chins.

Check out all the new foods and returning favorites served that this year’s OC Fair. Just be sure to leave some time between snacking, for rides and games.


Deep Fried Filet Mignon (Chicken Charlie’s)

Photo: Peter Pham

This year’s star dish from Chicken Charlie’s booth is the deep fried filet mignon. Hulked out medallions are skewered together, breaded, and deep fried. Imagine eating chicken fried steak on a stick, because that’s essentially what this is. Just wish we had some sausage gravy to dunk those steaks in. Next year, Charlie.

Caramel Crack Fries (Biggy’s)

Photo: Peter Pham

I’ve always been a fan of the marriage between sweet and salty. Give me some kettle corn or a maple bacon donut and I’m a happy dude. Biggy’s new Caramel Crack Fries is a stunning example of sweet and salty that combines salty cinnamon sugar fries, a generous drizzle of caramel, whipped cream, and Fruity Pebbles cereal.

Deep Fried Pineapple (Chicken Charlie’s)

Many feel pineapple doesn’t belong on a pizza, but no one said you can’t deep fry it. Chicken Charlie’s is offering freshly sliced pineapples that are plunged into Charlie’s special pancake batter and dunked in a vat of hot oil — the origins of a delicious fruit-themed superhero.

Lasagna Nachos (Pignotti’s)

Photo: OC Fair

Looks like lasagna nachos are slowly making it into the mainstream and I’m totally on board with it. Pignotti’s version takes deep-fried pieces of lasagna noodles and douses them in a bed of rich marinara sauce before being introduced to a second friend…Mister Cheese Blanket.

Spicy Turkey Leg (Biggy’s)

Photo: Peter Pham

Hardcore carnivores will likely go straight for the massive turkey legs found at Biggy’s. This year, they’re trying something a little spicier with a Cholula hot sauce variation of the classic turkey leg. Don’t worry, you’ll still get the same smokiness and girth as a regular leg, just with a extra helping of heat.

Mermaid Floats (Candy Factory)

Photo: Peter Pham

Between all the salty meats and the scorching summer heat, you’ll probably want to track down something sweet and refreshing to cool off with. Candy Factory has a smorgasbord of floats named after mythical creatures, such as the Unicorn and Mermaid Floats. These multi-colored refreshers feature a sweet soda sprinkled stacked with rainbow toppings and a heap of cotton candy.

Ramen Burritos (Chicken Charlie’s)

Photo: Peter Pham

Another new addition to Chicken Charlie’s lineup are these chicken and shrimp ramen burritos. Ramen noodles and Funyuns are joined with Charlie’s savory grilled chicken or shrimp in a warm tortilla, offering a trio of textures. Charlie tosses the noodles in his famous House Maui sauce and some Sriracha for a gentle hit of flavor.

Spaghetti Donuts (Pignotti’s)

Photo: OC Fair

I never knew spaghetti could be enjoyed without utensils until I saw Pignotti’s spaghetti donuts. The noodles are formed using a donut mold and tossed into the deep fryer with the love of an Italian grandparent. Instead of glaze, they’re topped with traditional pasta sauces — pesto, Alfredo, carbonara, or marinara.

Bacon Wrapped Pork Belly (Biggy’s)

Photo: Oscar Gonzalez

It’s not really a trip to the fair without some bacon. Biggy’s bacon-wrapped pork belly serves guests a skewer full of bacon inception. The crispy cured strips are wrapped around hunks of tender Duroc pork belly and slow roasted. Bacon lovers will definitely want to zero in on this item.


If that’s not enough to whet your whistle, here’s everything else you need to keep an eye out for at this year’s OC Fair:

  • Ice Cream Tacos (Bacon A Fair)
  • Truffle Tots (Tater Twister)
  • Mac and Cheese Tots (Tater Twister)
  • Cheeseburger Tacos (Juicy’s)
  • Gouda Wontons (Pignotti’s)
  • Gouda Nachos (Pignotti’s)
  • Dipped Ice Cream Sandwiches (Totally Baked Cookie Joint)
  • Big Skillet Cookie (Totally Baked Cookie Joint)
  • Bubble Waffle Cone Sundae (Fried Affair 2)
  • PBJ Sriracha Funnel Cake (Dutchman’s Funeral Cake)
  • Deep Fried Cheese Curds (Tasti Burger)
  • Chili Chamoy Candy Capple (Brander Candyland)
  • M&M Donut (Texas Donuts)
  • Unicorn Cotton Candy Donut (Texas Donuts)
  • Holy Coa’s Boba Tea (Pignotti’s)
  • Poke Bowls (Eddie’s)
Categories
Animals Hit-Or-Miss Now Trending

PETA Put A Dog’s Head On A Platter, Buses Refuse To Run The Ad

It’s well known that PETA is not afraid to make you feel uncomfortable while pushing their meat eater-hating agenda, but London buses refused to put up with a graphic ad that showed a roasted dog head being served on a silver platter.

In the controversial bus ad, PETA made the classic vegan argument that said, “If you wouldn’t eat your dog, why would you eat a turkey?” which is probably the ridiculous equivalent of, “You wouldn’t eat a poinsettia, why would you eat lettuce?”

A post shared by PETA UK (@petauk) on

On its latest Instagram post, PETA UK said:

One hundred buses were meant to be serving up some food for thought from PETA this Christmas, but at the last minute, London Buses refused to run our advert on the grounds that it may cause offence.
What’s truly offensive isn’t the ad but killing millions of turkeys for Christmas dinner – who have the same capacity to feel pain as dogs and cats.

The bus company, Transport for London, had a legit reason for nixing the ad, though. According to Mashable, UK advertising standards prevent marketers from using shock tactics and fear to promote something. Shock value is PETA’s forte, so it’s a surprise they get any ads up in the UK, at all.

While the ads didn’t run on the buses, attention was brought to the photo, so PETA got the attention they wanted, anyway. Congrats.