Categories
#foodbeast Adventures Animals Cravings Features FOODBEAST News SPONSORED Sustainability Video

Sustainable Farming Could Help Bluefin Tuna Populations Rally While Satisfying Sushi Lovers

The most popular fish that we eat are often the ones that get overwhelmingly overfished around the world. Such is the case for the bluefin tuna, whose fatty pink flesh has made it a prized gem for sushi and sashimi lovers. So coveted, in fact, that single bluefin tuna have sold for millions of dollars in Japan.

As a result of its popularity and demand, the bluefin population is now at a dangerously low amount that it may never recover from. However, $800 million worth of it is still consumed annually, further putting the entire species at risk of extinction.


Photo: Marc Kharrat//Foodbeast

One might think that farming is a potential solution to help the bluefin tuna, but unsustainable management and environmental concerns from fish waste have produced more problems than solutions in that regard. However, Tokyo trading giant Mitsui & Co. (Mitsui) is looking to rectify that issue. They’ve developed a new form of sustainable tuna farming that could satisfy sushi lovers while letting populations in the wild recover without a massive environmental strain.


Photo courtesy of Mitsui & Co.

To discover this process for ourselves, the FOODBEAST team followed a single fish raised by Mitsui from birth to sashimi. From a laboratory and farm in Southern Japan to a California sushi restaurant, we were able to see how the fish was raised, treated, fed, cared for, slaughtered, broken down, and served.

It’s an eye-opening process that shows just how much TLC goes into raising each tuna, and you can view it in its entirety in the above mini-doc.


Photo: Marc Kharrat//Foodbeast

With Mitsui supplying the tuna to restaurants around the world and New York-based seafood distributor Mark Foods, Inc. supplying the tuna in the U.S., this new sustainable practice could help change the future of tuna farming as we know it, and may one day help get tuna off of the endangered seafood list. It’ll definitely help us eat this sustainable tuna with the conscience that we’re helping save their wild populations by doing so.


Created in partnership with Mitsui & Co

Categories
#foodbeast Cravings Food Trucks FOODBEAST Restaurants SPONSORED

This LA Poke Shop Is Topping Their Bowls With Takis

A SoCal poke chain is giving the classic Hawaiian fish dish a true Angeleno twist.

Dakota Weiss, the creative genius behind Sweetfin Poke, has developed a Fiesta Tuna Poke Bowl that adds a ton of fresh LA tastes and combinations.

Mixed in with chunks of fresh tuna are jicama, avocado, grilled corn, and roasted jalapeno. They’re served atop a bed of Mexican chile oil fried rice, drizzled with tequila lime aioli, and topped with Takis.

Together, they add a zesty punch of spicy and citrus flavor that adds the essence of the elote carts of LA into a refreshing bowl of fish.

Sweetfin’s creation is being given out for FREE via the Hubert’s Lemon A Go Go Truck on Friday, November 16th, in Westwood near UCLA. For more information, head to foodbeast.com/huberts.


Created in partnership with Hubert’s. 

Categories
Culture Features

Here’s How Office Lunches Look Around The World

You’re halfway through your work day and your stomach is rumbling. Guess it’s time for lunch. As you sit there eating your salad, or leftover burrito, have you ever wondered what office lunches looked like on the other side of the world?

Viking Blog did some research and found the most typical office lunches from ten different countries around the world. Data was taken through a series of surveys, reports, and statistics. Through these windows across space and time, we’re able to see what folks usually chow on during their mid-day meal.

Let’s take a look at these mouthwatering office lunches around the world:


America

Photo courtesy of Viking

Viking found that a large amount of Americans have pizza for lunch, with pepperoni as the most preferred topping. To balance the saltiness from the ‘za are Skittles, chocolate ice cream, and a Coke rounding out the typical US lunch.

Austria

Photo courtesy of Viking

In Austria, one could find a simple and savory offering of schnitzel (breaded and fried meat) served with herb potatoes. Types of schnitzel can vary with pork, turkey, chicken, beef, and veal being the most popular.

Brazil

Photo courtesy of Viking

Feast your eyes on Brazil’s Feijoada, a bean stew that’s made with beef and pork. The popular lunch item is typically served with rice and coconut water. While not featured, cheesy tapioca bread, pao de queijo, pairs nicely with the stew.

England

Photo courtesy of Viking

You may find a hearty leek and potato soup in some office lunches in England. As a more solid offering, tuna sandwiches are also a common choice with Maltesers adding a sweet note to an office employee’s lunch break.

France

Photo courtesy of Viking

In France, a buttery sandwich made with slow-cooked ham called Jambon de Paris can be commonly found in lunch bags. One could also enjoy an elegant slice of apple pie with their lunch time meal.

Germany

Photo courtesy of Viking

Research found that German workers adore currywurst (curry sausage) for lunch. Since man cannot simply live on sausage alone, you would also find fries, an apple, and coffee on their lunch trays. Sounds absolutely divine.

India

Photo courtesy of Viking

What goes well with chai tea? How about a bountiful spread of Indian delicacies like rice and moongdal, peas and potato curry, chicken saagwala, and chapati. You bet we’d slip into a food coma after partaking in this satisfying lunch break.

Italy

Photo courtesy of Viking

We know if we worked in Italy, we’d be having pasta 24/7. Glad to see that tuna pasta is a fairly common lunch item in the country. One would also find fresh salad and espresso to balance out all those carbs.

Netherlands

Photo courtesy of Viking

A boxed lunch in the Netherlands would more than likely feature these sweet and simple items: a gouda sandwich, some grapes, and apple slices. Expect to spot these lunch foods in both an office setting and a school setting.

Turkey

Photo courtesy of Viking

It’s not pizza, it’s pide. This traditional Turkish flatbread is topped with spinach and feta cheese. Some variations even include either lamb or beef. A typical Turkish beverage to go with the office lunch, of course, would be coffee.

Categories
Animals Hit-Or-Miss Video

Watch Carnivorous Sea Creatures Feast On A Giant School Of Sardines

The ocean is filled with uncertainty and survival is never guaranteed. If you’re someone who fears the ocean, this video will give you another reason to stay out of the water.

The award winning series Planet Earth has always captured the most incredible natural phenomena in stunning high definition, with pristine detail. Now, thanks to a recently uploaded clip found on the BBC Earth YouTube page, the Internet got to witness a feverish feeding frenzy, that provided a first hand look at what goes on beneath the surface when the locals get hangry.

This aquatic battle started with some sea lions, trying to corner a school of thousands of sardines, which swim in circles, close to the surface, to avoid being caught. Interestingly enough, the sea lions can’t get the upper hand, without the help of additional predators.

Soon, tuna, diving sea birds, dolphins, and sharks start to join the party — quickly turning this necessary ritual of survival into an oceanic episode of Game of Thrones. Then, at the peak of the battle a giant whale comes into frame — swallowing countless sardines in one swift gulp.

The intensity of this clip showcases the instinctual efforts animals will put forth to work together to help ensure survival, proving that hunger’s grip on any creature will induce varied sorts of frenzy.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

9 Everyday Foods That Could Kill Your Cat

Owning a pet of any kind brings joy, companionship and most of all — responsibility. So, even if you’re experienced with animals, it’s your job to make sure your felines are healthy and happy. One of the easiest ways to monitor your pet’s well-being is closely monitoring a diet that’s toxin-free in order to keep your furry roommate’s tummy out of harm’s way.

If you’re one of the 85.8 million people that own a cat, then you know it’s not often you have to watch everything that goes into it’s mouth, since cats are generally very fussy eaters. While our claw-equipped fur pillows might express some curiosity every time you make a tuna sandwich — that doesn’t mean you should feel inclined to make two.

With that said, here’s a few of the most common human foods that could actually be fatal to felines. So, take note to ensure that culinary curiosity doesn’t kill your cat.

1. Tuna & Poke

What can it do?

Although poke maybe be delicious, it’s not the best treat for your cat.

Actually, in excess tuna — and other fish—  in general is considered to be borderline unhealthy for cats because tuna doesn’t contain the nutrients cats need for a healthy digestive system.

Too much tuna for cats can lead to malnutrition. Additionally, poke is usually made with freshly squeezed lemon or citrus juice, which can cause vomiting, stomach irritation, and other digestive issues for our feline companions.

2. Fish & Poultry With Bones

What can it do?

Be careful if you feed your cats chicken or fish that might contain bones, as cats can easily choke on them. Fish bones are somewhat flexible, and can easily be consumed by a hungry kitty.

But let’s err on the side of caution here.

3. Alcohol

What can it do?

One teaspoon of alcohol can put a five pound cat into a coma, according to the ASPCA. Cat livers don’t operate as efficiently as the human liver  — which means wine, beer or spirits can cause serious health problems.

So, even if you and your cat are relaxing after a hard day at work, and you feel inclined to pour a little of alcohol into his or her bowl —  don’t.

However, if you feel like your cat just needs to, “wine” about their day of sleeping and watching birds, this cat wine will provide a healthy alternative.

 

4. Caffeine

@tania_crystal0126 (instagram)

What can it do?

Even small amounts of caffeine can cause rapid breathing, heart palpitations, and muscle tremors in cats.

Caffeine can be found in an array of products — even decaf coffee, teas, and other beverages — without consumer knowledge.

Since caffeine isn’t a nutrient, the Food and Drug Administration doesn’t require food manufacturers to list caffeine as food nutrition labels.

5. Chocolate

What can it do?

While dogs are more likely to get into a stash of indulgent chocolate before a cat does, it’s still a good idea to keep it out of kitty’s reach.

Theobromine is an alkaloid found in chocolate, which can cause everything from vomiting and diarrhea.

It’s estimated that more than 200 mg of theobromine can also cause cardiac failure.

 

6. Grapes & Raisins

@bordeauxwinelovers (instagram)

What can it do?

While grapes and raisins might seem like harmless treats for your cat, it’s a silent killer.

However, it’s unknown exactly what compound in grapes and raisins that make the fruit toxic to cats. If ingested, grapes have been known to cause kidney failure in them.

7. Candy, Gum, Toothpaste, or anything with Xylitol

What can it do?

Every diet soda you drink contains Xylitol, which is a sugar alcohol used as a sweetener in a lot of common foods. However, it will be anything but sweet to your inquisitive cat.

Xylitol can increase in the insulin circulating through your cat’s body, which will cause the cat’s blood sugar to drop, and can also lead to liver failure.

8. Baking Dough

What can it do?

Imagine your cat’s tummy as a tiny oven — if it eats uncooked dough, it will begin to expand inside.

This will obviously result in some discomfort to your four-legged friend, so be sure to keep baking dough out of kitty’s claws and jaws.

9. Raw Meat

What can it do?

Raw meat is never safe to eat due to the harmful bacteria, like salmonella, E. Coli and even listeria — which can cause an array of health issues for humans and their pets.

Always make sure your meat is covered and out of reach, you never know when kitty will hop up on the kitchen counter to investigate.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Dead Tuna Gets Sliced In Half, Then Comes Back To Life [WATCH]

Once you’ve cut into your food, you probably expect it to be dead, but some animals keep the fighting spirit alive, even after death.

A yellowtail tuna was sliced in half, surely getting ready to become someone’s meal, but it wasn’t immediately going on a plate, as it spent almost 2 minutes flailing around like a fish zombie.

The video was posted to Twitter, Wednesday by user Yutaka Suzuki, and it’s pretty freaky, to see the split open tuna swing around on the tray.

This reminds us of an eel in South Korea that was ready to be cooked at a restaurant, but began floundering as soon as it came into contact with the hot grill.

In both cases, neither was alive, obviously, but muscle reflexes were still active.

As long as it’s dead and under control by the time it reaches my table, I’m good with it.

Categories
Health News

‘Hepatitis A’ Found In Tuna Across California, Massive Recall Is In Effect

Seafood lovers beware, as the Hepatitis A virus was linked to frozen tuna from Hilo Fish Company, and has affected 31 different restaurants in California, Texas, and Oklahoma (list below).

The fish in question for this recall include, frozen yellowfin tuna steaks from both Sustainale Seafood Company, and yellowfin tuna cubes from Santa Cruz Seafood.

No one has gotten sick yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but they’re suggesting that consumers to get checked out for a post exposure prophyolaxis (PEP) if they have not been vaccinated.

If you’re not familiar with Hepatitis A symptoms,  they include fatigue, abdominal pain, abnormal liver tests, dark urine, and a pale stool, according to the FDA.

The establishments affected by the recall include, in California:

-Almansor Court- 701 S. Almansor St., Alhambra, CA

-Arroyo Trabuco- 26772 Avery Pkwy, Mission Viejo, CA

-Blue HI Café- 2 Embarcardero, San Francisco, CA

-Bonito Poke- 2277 Shafter Ave. San Francisco, CA

-Camp Four Wine Café- 1508 10th St. Modesto, CA

-Doubletree- 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont, CA

-Fenix- 919 4th ST. San Rafael, CA

-Fuzio’s- 1020 10th St. Modesto, CA

-Galaxy Foods Inc- 31224 Palos Verdes Dr. W., Rancho Palos Verdes, CA

-Galetto Ristorante- 1101 J St., Modesto, CA

-High Sierra Grill House- 2003 W. Bullard, Fresno, CA

-Hotel Irvine- 17900 Jamboree Rd, Irvine, CA

-Jus Poke- 501 N. Pacific Coast Hwy, Redondo Beach, CA

-Noelani- 1037 Laurel St. San Carlos, CA

-Ola Mexican Kitchen- Huntington Beach, CA

-Poke Shack- 2001 Lawton St. San Francisco, CA

-Shamrock Foods- 12400 Riverside Dr. Eastvale, CA

Texas and Oklahoma:

-Central Market Kitchen N- HEB Vendor #15385, Austin, TX

-Conservatory Plano- 6401 Ohio Dr. Plano, TX

-Hilton Garden Inn- 23535 Northgate Crossing, Spring, TX

-Jack Ryan’s- 102 N. College Ave. Tyler, TX

-Jack Ryan’s- 119 N. Longview St. Kilgore, TX

-Johnny Tamale- 4647 E. Sam Houston, Pasadena, TX

-Marriott Conf. Center- 2801 St. Hwy 9, Norman OK

-Myron’s Prime Steakhouse- 10003 NW Military Hwy, San Antonio, TX

-Prestonwood CC- 15909 Preston Rd., Dallas, TX

-Sea Ranch Restaurant- 1 Padre Blvd., S Padre Island, TX

-Sysco East Texas- 4577 Estes Pkwy, Longview, TX

-Sysco Foods Central Texas- 1260 Schwab R. New Braunfels, TX

-Sysco Food Houston- 10710 Greens Crossing Blvd, Houston, TX

-The Schooner- 1507 S, Hwy 69, Nederland, TX

Sushi has been getting dragged a bit of late, with the CDC recently warning against a parasitic disease called Anisakiasis, as cases have been slowly growing in the United States. Earlier this year, we also learned that half the sushi dishes in Los Angeles are actually mislabeled, and you’re not actually getting what you ask for.

The FDA is doing additional testing on the food coming out of Hilo Company, but if you think you’ve eaten at any of the listed places, make sure to get checked by a doctor, just in case.

Categories
Culture Hit-Or-Miss

Japan’s ‘Tuna King’ Pays More Than $600,000 For A Single Fish

ns-tuna-king-cover

Sushi entrepreneur Kiyoshi Kimura, also known as Japan’s “Tuna King”, has won at Tsukiji’s famous fish auction once again.

Kimura, the head of Japan’s Sushizanmai chain, paid more than a whopping $600,000 for a 212-kg (467-lb) Bluefin tuna at the first auction held at Tokyo’s Tsukiji fish market, according to AsiaOne. Based on the price he paid, a single piece of tuna sushi would cost around $85, 25 times more than the $3.40 price he charges at his 51 stores spread all over Japan.

“I feel it was a bit expensive, but I am happy that I was able to successfully win at auction a tuna of good shape and size,” said Kimura.

The “Tuna King” was able to transition his successful chain into a national brand by paying massive amounts of money at Tsukiji’s first auction every year. Kimura has won six straight times including this year – which is also essentially and strategically used for publicity.

ns-tuna-king-01

Image via Humanoid One

His most expensive purchase by far was a bluefin tuna he won at the same auction against a rival bidder from Hong Kong. He paid an eye-watering $1.8 million at the New Year’s auction held in 2013.

Although the prices look very intimidating, Kimura makes sure that he gets the most out from his purchase. To spread the word and place the spotlight on his business, Kimura announced on Japan’s major TV networks that the bluefin tuna will be cut and distributed among his many restaurants.

“As always, I want to buy the best one so that our customers can have it. That’s all,” Kimura said.

According to Daily Mail, the 2017 fish auction could be the last one at Tsukiji – the world’s largest fish market.

The event was supposed to be moved in another location in November of last year but it was put on hold because of toxic contamination concerns at the new site. Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike said that the move could be delayed until spring of 2018, but all plans remain indefinite.

Written by King Malleta | NextShark | Feature Image via Flickr / Tai-Jan Huang