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Restaurants Sweets

Instagram-Famous ‘Mochi Muffins’ Shipping Nationwide For The First Time Ever

If you’re from or have been to the San Francisco Bay Area recently, you know that the hot sweet treat around there is the Mochi Muffin. Third Culture Bakery, the shop behind the viral and widespread treat, is now making their signature food available for purchase nationwide for the first time ever.

Owners Sam Butarbutar and Wenter Shyu have been growing the Third Culture Bakery brand, with a new bakeshop having opened a few weeks back in Colorado. With the coronavirus pandemic drastically affecting everyone, however, the company decided to expand their Mochi Muffin offering to nationwide masses yearning to get a taste.

As of press time, Third Culture is only selling their Original Mochi Muffin nationwide, rather than branching out into the other flavors they make for shipping just yet. Shyu told Foodbeast that their other flavors of the mochi muffins will be available for national delivery later this week. Folks who live within UberEats ranges for their Bay Area and Denver also have access to the showrooms’ full online menus.

The Original Mochi Muffins are sweet while nutty, with a base of rice flour and ingredients like sesame and pandan that add to their aroma. They’re also incredibly squishy, and might be the closest to an edible stress ball we’ll ever get to.

You can now find these Mochi Muffins for sale on Third Culture’s website in packs of either 6 or 12, alongside other items like Uji Ceremonial Matcha, rice flour totes, and other apparel. Shyu told Foodbeast that they’ve already shipped to 16 states so far.

Photos courtesy of Third Culture Bakery.

Categories
Food Trends Humor Products Sweets

Meet Japan’s Mayonnaise-Flavored Ice Cream Bar

Photo provided by Moringa Milk Supply

From candied squid to tomato chocolates, Japan is known for their unconventional flavor concoctions. Continuing that tradition, Moringa Milk Industry is here to twist your taste expectations yet again with a mayonnaise-flavored ice cream bar. It goes by the equally outrageous name The Calorie Monster Cherio Creamy Mayonnaise Flavor, is 307 calories and coated in white chocolate and cookie crumbs. Sure to fulfill even the sweetest of tooths, it surpasses the average calorie count in Japanese milk teas which come in around 278. 

Photo Provided by log1i_yk for Gigazine.net

A taste review reveals that a bite into this milky beast has an initial crispy texture of white chocolate and cookie crumbs before giving way to the sour creaminess of mayonnaise flavor within. The mayo aftertaste is unmistakable, though doesn’t overwhelm the white chocolate sweetness. This takes Japan’s love for mayonnaise to a whole new level.

The Calorie Monster Cherio Creamy Mayonnaise Flavor ice cream bar is now available until March 2020 at convenience stores and supermarkets all around Japan and can be found online here.

Categories
Health Sweets

New Study Suggests Consuming Sugary Drinks Linked to Cancer

Consuming sugary drinks could be worse for our health than we previously thought, according to the results of a new study, conducted over 10 years.

The research was done by a French team, who wanted to discover if there is a link between consuming sugary drinks and the risk of cancer. Mathilde Touvier the lead author of the studysays that in order to be healthy, it is essential that we limit the amount of sugary drinks we consume daily. And that the risk associated with these comes from the large amount of sugar they contain. Touvier is also the research director of the Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team of the National Health and Medical Research Institute at the Paris 13 University.

“The results indicate statistically significant correlations between the consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks and risk of all cancers combined, and of breast cancer,” said Ian Johnson, nutrition researcher and emeritus fellow, Quadram Institute Bioscience, quoted by CNN. Johnson wasn’t involved in the research but validated the results to the Science Media Centre in the UK.

Consuming sugary drinks, how much is too much? 

“High sugary drinks consumption is a risk factor for obesity and weight gain,” she said. “Obesity is in itself a risk factor for cancer,” she added.

How many sugary drinks can we have and still feel safe? Touvier thinks the maximum should be one glass a day.

The research had 101,257 French subjects, all healthy adults, with an average age of 42. Of those, 79 percent are women and 21 percent are men. The participants filled out two questionnaires and were monitored over nine years. Their habits when it comes to consuming sugary drinks, but also their diet, were analyzed by the researchers.

2,193 cases of cancer were then reported by the study participants. The disease was diagnosed at an average age of 59 years. Of these, 693 were breast cancer cases, 291 prostate cancer cases, and 166 colorectal cancer cases.

It is important to note that not only processed beverages are bad for your health, but also the freshly squeezed juices you make at home.

Related Links:

Do You Get the Drunchies? Allow Us to Explain

Unhealthy Diets Kill More People than Tobacco, Study Says

Food that Ages You: What Items to Replace to Preserve Your Youth


Article by Ruxandra Grecu from So Delicious. View the original article here.

Categories
Products Sweets

OREO Is Selling A Turntable Powered By Cookies, Seriously

Now that Thanksgiving is over, we’re really going to have to get a jump on our holiday shopping. No more last minute lottery tickets from this guy. If any of your friends or loved ones happen to be Oreo fiends, Nabisco just launched a new item that might be the perfect present to leave a song in their hearts.

Called the Oreo Music Box, the device is designed to turn cookie consumption into a musical experience.

Here’s how it works:

  • Put a whole Oreo cookie on the turntable
  • Move the music box “arm” over the cookie to make music play.
  • As you take more bites of the cookie, the melody will change.

You can also record your own message or melody, up to 30 seconds, directly on the device.

The Oreo Music Box is currently sold through Amazon for $19.99, while supplies last. Each order comes with a single music box, five Oreo Thins packs, one 5.2 ounce pack of Original Oreo cookies, one 8.5 ounce pack of White Fudge Oreo cookies, and three 1-ounce packs of Oreo Thins.

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Sweets Tastemade/Snapchat

This Is What Donuts Look Like Around the World

Let’s face it, any time is a good time for donuts. Morning, afternoon or late night, there’s always room for a donut outing to satisfy those sweet tooth cravings. The history of American donuts, traditional round pieces of fried dough with a hole in the center, can be traced back to the 1800s. However, from an international standpoint, American donuts are just a fraction of the world’s donut population.

While the term donut is universal, there are many variations, all with different shapes, sizes, textures, toppings, and filling. It seems the simplicity of frying dough and modifying it to match the culture has become much more than just food.

So, just to show you what you’ve been missing, here’s some donut alternatives for you to sink your teeth into once that donut craving sets in.

Italy — Bomboloni

Bomboloni caldi caldi…#angolodellapizzadicorrado #bomboloni

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In Italy, bomboloni are small, round pastries, traditionally stuffed with custard, chocolate,and marmalade, and coated with granular sugar.

Mexico — Churros

Churros tower from @elcapo_cantina, plus it’s happy hour all night tonight. #EATMCR

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While the country of origin is heavily debated, one thing everyone can agree on is that churros are delicious. While theoretically created somewhere in Spain, these pillars of fried dough are rolled in cinnamon and sugar and may contain filling. Churros have become very popular in American culture, appearing at county fairs, amusement parks, and even setting precedent for new churro-based ice cream shops. In Mexico, churros are usually best served with hot fudge or melted chocolate and are made for dunking. 

Israel — Sufganiyot

This Israelian pastry is a Middle Eastern version of the jelly donut. In Israel, sufganiyots are a popular treat made specifically during the annual celebration of Hanukkah. Traditionally, these treats are stuffed with jelly or custard, and topped with powdered sugar.    

India — Balushahi

If you’re looking for donuts in India, you might want to try a balushahi or badusha. This sweet, flaky version of a glazed donut is deep-fried in clarified butter and take a healthy dip in sugar syrup.  

South America — Buñuelos

Bunuelos for one 🍩☝🏼 Dip a bit of salted caramel on your Wednesday 🔥 RG: @julespenlington

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Buñuelos are very popular in several parts of South America including Colombia, Guatemala, as well as Spain and Morocco across the pond. The dough is traditionally rolled into a ball and fried. In Mexico, buñuelos are usually served with syrup and made with a type of sugar called piloncillo, which is made from boiled sugar cane juice.

South Asia — Jalebi

This spiral-shaped pastry is native to South Asia and is referred to as a zulbia in some regions. Jalebi is made traditionally made by deep-frying wheat flour batter into the shape of a pretzel or a funnel cake. The sweet tip is a healthy soak of sugar syrup for added saccharine measure.  

France — Beignet

Perhaps one of the world’s most popular donut pastries is France’s beignet. This light, fluffy treat is made with a deep fried dough known as choux. In the U.S., it is ommonly served as a breakfast pastry topped with heaps of powdered sugar.

Germany — Berliner

This jelly-filled pastry shares similarities to Israel’s sufganiyot pastry, as well as the traditional jelly donut of the United States. Berliners were primarily made as a celebratory food for New Years, but thanks to an irresistible taste, Berliners have found a permanent function as a delicious dessert all year long.  

The Netherlands — Oliebol

This Dutch pastry had origin that was said to have been with early Germanic tribes during the Yule period between December 26 to to January 6.. Also known as smoutebollen, Dutch donuts, or Dutchies, oliebol pastries have become a respected version of fried dough across the globe.

Turkey — Lokma


This dessert pastry is local to Turkey, Greece, and Egypt. These bite-sized pieces of fried dough are usually covered with a simple syrup, honey, or chocolate when served.  The word “lokma” actually means “morsel” or “mouthful,” which is a clear indication of what folks want to have of these.

South Africa — Koeksister


Pronounced “coke-sister,” the popular South African dessert, koeksister, is named after the Dutch word   “koek,” for confectionery. Resembling the American glazed twist donut, but in a more concise braid, this delightful pastry is one of the most iconic treats of South Africa..  

Northern Africa —  Sfenj

#sfenjparty #sfenj #beignet #recettemarocaine #croustillant et #délicieux. سفنج# #faitmaison

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This North African pastry is often compare to a fritter, thanks to its crispy exterior, and it’s buttery softness inside. They’re usually served up doused with sugar or dipped in honey for breakfast with a cup of mint tea. Makes for an ideal first meal of the day, I’d say.  

Poland — Pączki


This Polish desert is similar to the American donut in shape and texture. Traditionally, Polish pączkies are made with a minimal amount of grain alcohol. Other tasty deets include these treats served up with fruit and cream fillings including, custard, raspberry, and apple.

China — Youtiao

#youtiao #siamsunset

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Youtiao are a savory Chinese donut lightly salted and typically served for breakfast with rice porridge. Clearly breakfast being the most important meal of the day knows no bounds.

The Caribbean — Johnny Cakes

In the Caribbean, johnnycakes are the fried dough of choice — even if they’re a typical staple in New England cuisine — by way of the local Native Americans — with an origin from Rhode Island. Expect these to be enjoyed like a pancake, with honey, syrup or other sweet toppings.

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Hit-Or-Miss Tastemade/Snapchat

This Is Why Asia Wins at Dessert

Sure, we can lay claim to the Cronut (croissant donut) and Milky Bun (ice cream stuffed donut) as some of the craziest desserts to hail from the United States in recent memory. While our country is churning out fantastic and bizarre sweets week after week, our neighbors to the East have also been crushing it for centuries.

Check out some of the most unique desserts enjoyed in Asia that you may not even have heard of.

Khanom Cha

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A classic Thai dessert, Khanom Chan literally translates to “layered dessert.” Similar to Woon Bai Toey (sweet coconut milk and pandan jelly), Khanam Chan boasts a gelatinous taste. Made from pandan leaves, sticky rice flour, and coconut milk, the dish is steamed and stacked together in multiple layers. Nine, a number of prosperity, is usually the amount of layers seen in the dessert.

Luk Chup

The process of making Luk Chup is a bit tedious: grinding steamed mung beans into a paste, molding them into the shape of fruit, coloring them, and finally glazing them in gelatin. Still, once you’ve accomplished all those steps, you’re left with a plateful of vibrant desserts that look like candy versions of the real thing, each complete with different layers of flavor and textures originally intended for Thai royalty.

Mooncake

A classic Chinese dessert that can most commonly be found during the Mid-Autumn Festival, Mooncakes are pastries filled with red bean or lotus seed paste. Each mooncake is imprinted with a variety of Chinese characters that stand for either “longevity” or “harmony.” You can also find the name of the bakery inside each cake.

Cathedral Glass Jello

Also known as Broken Glass Gelatin, this vibrant dessert in the Philippines is made from condensed milk and a variety of colored Jello. Once it’s finished, it resembes “Broken Glass” or the stained windows of a majestic cathedral.

Woon Bai Toey

Made from the aromatic pandan leaf and coconut, Woon Bai Toey is a Thai gelatin dessert that boasts a creamy and nutty flavor with a chewy texture. The dessert typically follows a spicy Thai dish to help refresh the palate. FoodTravelTVEnglish shows you the step-by-step process to create this dessert.

Che Ba Mau

A dessert soup or pudding that’s found in Vietnam, che is made from mung beans, black-eyed peas, kidney beans, tapioca, jelly, and aloe vera. Che Ba Mau is a variation of the dish that is comprised of three main ingredients as Ba Mau translates to “three colors.” Choice of beans vary as long as the three colors are distinct.

Leche Flan

In the Philippines, leche flan is a celebrated dessert that originated as a Spanish dish. Made with condensed milk and egg yolk, the sweet dessert is steamed over an open flame. Unlike the Spanish variation of flan, the one served in the Philippines is much more rich — featuring more egg yolks and sugar.

Yagkwa

A deep-fried Korean pastry, Yagkwa is made with wheat flour, honey, and sesame oil. Yagkwa originated as a medicinal cookie that’s soaked in honey. Because of how much honey it contains and being deep fried at low temperatures of 248-284 degrees F, the pastry is both moist and soft when you bite into it. ARIRANG CULTURE did a recipe video for those curious.

Patbingsu

Bingsoo 🍨

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Patbingsu, or “red beans shaved ice,” is a Korean dessert made of shaved ice, ice cream, condensed milk, red beans, and fruit. The earliest known variation of the dessert dates back to the year 1392. Today, you can find the cold dessert at most Korean restaurants and dessert spots specializing in the icy treat, adorned with chopped bits of fruit and plenty of syrup.

Higashi

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A type of wagashi (a Japanese confection), higashi is made with rice flour. Featuring intricate designs, the sweet and starchy dessert can typically be found during tea ceremonies. The creation of wagashi desserts came after China began producing sugar and traded it with Japan.

Raindrop Cake

Is it even food? Idk lol 💁💁💁 #looksgoodtho #raindropcake

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A highly popular dessert that started out in Japan, the Raindrop Cake became immensely popular among social media stateside once it debuted at New York food market Smorgasburg by Chef Darren Wong. Made from water and agar, a vegan sort of gelatin, the cake resembles a giant raindrop. Typically, raindrop cakes are served with a roasted soybean flour and molasses or honey to add flavor.

Uncle Tetsu’s Cheesecake

Known for their fluffiness and distinct jiggle, Uncle Tetsu’s Cheesecakes started in Japan over 30 years ago. These cheesecakes are made up of flour, eggs, cream cheese, sugar, baking powder, honey, butter, milk, and a special Australian cheese. The result is a super soft, rich, and flavorful cheesecake that’s got as much moves as a bowl of Jello! Uncle Tetsu’s Cheesecakes became so popular that multiple franchises have sprouted all over the world to cater to the popularity of these moist wonders.

Categories
Drinks

The Shocking Origins Behind Pink Lemonade

Pink-Lemonade-StockSnap-01

On a scorching day, the sight of a bright-pink glass of lemonade can be a godsend for the thirsty. The combination of sweet and sour accents excites your tongue as the pink aesthetic attracts your eyes.

Pink lemonade has been everywhere in our lives, from fast food restaurants to bottles on grocery store shelves. We went nuts as a kid seeing a self-serve container of pink lemonade at our local In-N-Out. Even years later, it’s the only fast food spot we can find that serves the option readily.

Have you ever wondered, however, where the beverage came from and gives it its distinctive pink hue?

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There have been two major accounts of how the light-crimson beverage came to be, states the Huffington Post. Both origins, if you can believe it, left us a little less enchanted with the drink. At least, until the next 100-degree Californian day.

How the Hot Dog Found Its Bun,” a book by author Josh Chetwynd, claims that there are two alleged inventors of pink lemonade.

The first was a salesman named Pete Conklin, who sold concessions at Jerry Mabie show, which was the equivalent of Coachella for circuses, back in 1857. One day, he ran out of water to make lemonade with. Instead of closing up shop until he replenished his supplies, he went over to the dressing room of one of the circus’ bareback riders. The woman had just washed her pink tights in a water vat, leaving the liquid with a pink color.

Conklin took the vat of pink water, threw in some tantric acid and pieces of lemons and decided to rebrand the water as “fine strawberry lemonade,” doubling his business and creating a new drink as he did so.

Conklin’s story was also confirmed in Joe Nickell’s book “Secrets of the Sideshows.”

Pink-Lemonade-StockSnap

Pink Lemonade’s second origin, accounts Smithsonian Mag, churns our stomachs a little less.

A New York Times article from 1912 spotlights circus promoter and saloon keeper Henry E. Allott as the inventor of the beverage.

While Allot was mixing a batch of lemonade, he accidentally dropped some red cinnamon candies into the liquid. A unique rose tint resulted from the incident, creating a beverage that sold surprisingly well.

Because Allott said he created this as a teenager, it places his claim about 20 years after Conklin’s tale of used underwear.

Though there’s no way of telling which story, if either, is the definitive birth of the popular drink. We can assume, according to Chetwynd, that the drink was either created or at least popularized by the circus.

Today, in a time of fewer circus folk and more FDA regulations, pink lemonade is made a little differently. The beverage is colored with more natural ingredients like cranberry juice, raspberry juice, crushed strawberries, or red food dye.

Thankfully, no nasty underwear water.

A hundred years from now, while humanity sits on porches strewn across one of the TRAPPIST-1 planets, we’ll be sippin’ on lemonade squeezed fresh from genetically-modified pink lemons. Until then, we’re more than happy with our present addition of strawberries and food coloring in our pink lemonade.

Categories
Fast Food

Jack In The Box Adds Grilled FRENCH TOAST To Brunchfast Menu

JITB-Grilled-French-Toast-Cover

If given the choice between breakfast or any other meal of the day, we’d choose breakfast without a second thought. Unless, that is, brunch is on the table.

Jack in the Box recently launched their new Brunchfast menu late last year. The fast food chain’s amalgam of breakfast and lunch items made our hearts grow three sizes when they finally hit the nationwide menu as a 24-hour offering.

Now, a new gladiator has stepped into Jack’s Brunchfast ring: Grilled French Toast.

The new menu item features three pieces of grilled French toast topped with maple syrup and served with either strips of bacon or a sausage patty.

For those looking for a sweet alternative to those mini pancakes, this new menu item might be just the thing to shake up your taste buds. The new Grilled French Toast will be available at all participating Jack in the Box locations.

Photo: Jack in the Box