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News Restaurants

Subway Launches Website Defending Their Tuna

Subway’s tuna has endured a ton of scrutiny and slander this past month after a New York Times report stated that tests revealed that the sandwich chain’s offering was not tuna at all.

Now, amidst a massive brand rehaul, Subway has gone on the offensive, launching SubwayTunaFacts.com. The new site is designed to quell any doubts about the validity of the tuna Subway is serving. In it readers can find a comprehensive Tuna Q&A, facts dispelling myths, and information on where Subway sources their tuna.

Though many have already pointed out the flaws in the New York Times tuna tests, will this website from Subway be enough to convince the public that their tuna is 100% legit?

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Fast Food Restaurants

Subway Is Starting Its Largest Menu Revamp In The Chain’s History

Photo courtesy of Subway

After years mired in multiple controversies, Subway is finally giving its entire brand and menu a new facelift.

Starting on July 13th, locations nationwide will be undergoing a “Eat Fresh Refresh” that revamps a number of sandwiches, ingredients, and adds new items to the chain’s menu.

Items with past scandals that are getting upgraded include the chain’s bread, with two new loaves available to pile cold cuts and veggies into (Artisan Italian and Hearty Multigrain). There’s also a ton of new topping options, including smashed avocado and fresh mozzarella, and improvements to meat options like bacon, steak, rotisserie chicken, roast beef, and more.

Photo courtesy of Subway

Subway is also bringing back their Rotisserie Chicken and Roast Beef subs as part of the refresh. Four new sandwiches also join their arsenal: Turkey Cali Fresh, Steak Cali Fresh, Subway Club, and All-American Club.

As part of the upgrade, some Subway restaurants are also getting remodels or redesigns, and technology upgrades like Subway delivery are also getting added.

The biggest change Subway isn’t making? They’re sticking to their guns on their tuna, despite lawsuits and news reports that DNA tests on the fish were inconclusive (albeit, how those tests were conducted is a concern all on its own).

To make all of these changes happen, 10,000 or more Subway locations will close starting at 6 pm on July 12th so the makeovers can take place. On July 13th, a new and improved Subway, hoping to stand out and look fresher than its past model, will be ready for the public to try for the first time.

It’s a bold and ambitious attempt to get people back into Subway stores. We’ll just have to see whether its a success and the new ingredients prove to deliver when it comes to flavor.

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Fast Food Opinion Science

Is Subway’s Tuna Lawsuit Too Fishy To Be True?

Photo: Dontree on Shutterstock

Fast food sandwich giant Subway was rocked with another potential scandal this week. Years after dealing with allegations about their chicken containing other proteins, a lawsuit has been filed claiming that Subway’s tuna salad isn’t made with tuna.

According to the Washington Post, plaintiffs in the lawsuit got samples of the tuna from multiple locations in California. They declined to say the ingredients found, but claim that the salad mix was “not tuna” and “not fish.”

Subway has vehemently denied the allegations, saying they use “pure tuna” in a statement to the Post. Their ingredients list on the chain’s website also only has two ingredients for the salad mix: Flaked tuna in brine (which has tuna, water, and salt) and mayonnaise (which also contains spices and a preservative called EDTA that protects its flavor).

Obviously, given the history of fast food claims in the past, this controversy has swarmed swarmed the food news cycle. However, there are some questions brought up in the nature of the lawsuit that suggest it may not succeed.

Specifically, the lawsuit does not name what tests it used to determine how Subway’s tuna salad has no tuna. The most obvious forms of testing would be DNA barcoding or identification tests, which were used back when the chain’s chicken was evaluated in Canada.

While we don’t know if the plaintiffs used that kind of testing, we do know that it can raise some potential concerns on accuracy. Canned tuna (which the flakes come from) is known to cause issues when used in a DNA barcoding test. A 2017 review of DNA barcoding techniques in fish from Chapman University found that canned fish products often had a lower success rate and quality when it came to results.

The DNA barcoding sequences used could also be hindered by other ingredients in the salad mix. Given how the tuna is blended into mayonnaise, which is made with eggs, the possibility exists that the test results could be mixed with chicken DNA from the mayo.

The tests were conducted in independent labs, which should help reduce bias in the plaintiffs’ results. Unless they would be able to get the actual pre-mixed tuna from Subway, however, we don’t know for sure if any test results would be accurate. To date, the plaintiffs haven’t offered up additional information on how their testing was conducted.

It’s also unclear if any replications were performed to confirm results for the same samples, which was done back when CBC did their investigation of Subway’s chicken. Without knowing more information about how testing was conducted, given the data the plaintiffs have released, it’s hard to trust the veracity of the claims they’ve made to news outlets.

Of course, the plaintiffs could also be right, and probably wouldn’t be going to court unless they believed they had a strong case. Either way, we’ll have to see how this lawsuit plays out in court.

Categories
Fast Food Health

Ireland Supreme Court Says Subway Bread Isn’t Bread

There’s something about Subway bread that’s always so addicting. I always chalked it up to extreme hunger every time I order from the fast-food sandwich chain. Turns out that there’s something in the bread. 

CBS News reports that a recent ruling by the Ireland Supreme Court deemed that Subway bread isn’t technically bread at all. 

A tax dispute from an Irish Subway franchisee, Bookfinders Ltd., brought forth this decision after they argued that items such as teas, coffees, and heated sandwiches should not be subjected to value-added tax. 

The appeal was rejected earlier this week by a panel of judges and ruled that the bread at Subway had way too much sugar to be considered a “staple food.” Staple foods are typically not taxed. 

To be considered “bread,” the sugar content in the flour cannot exceed 2%. Subway’s contained 10%.

Maybe that’s why I find their bread so delicious. 

Categories
Fast Food

‘Subway Nachos’ Are The Hack That DESERVES To Be A Real Menu Item

Photo courtesy of @miladfromsubway on TikTok. Subway logo from MOs810 // Wikimedia Commons

There’s a plethora of ways to customize sandwiches at Subway with the variety of ingredients available.

One Subway worker on TikTok, @miladfromsubway, has given the internet one to salivate over, and one we’re angry isn’t actually on the Subway menu: Subway “nachos.”

@miladfromsubway

One day @subway will sponsor me, and we will put Nachos on the menu 😤 Reply to @brianspilner98

♬ original sound – miladfromsubway

These are clearly something that others have created before, as Milad actually got the suggestion from one of his followers in the comments who claimed to be a former worker at the sandwich chain. Milad also gave it a pretty high rating, listing it as a 9.96/10 on his TikTok and telling Foodbeast that they were “delicious, tasted like a legit platter.”

To make the nachos, Milad started by dumping an entire bag of Doritos chips onto some of the chain’s paper. He added on steak, cheese, peppers, onions, jalapenos, and Subway’s Chipotle Southwest sauce. The entire creation then went into the toaster to melt the cheese and broil everything else to perfection.

Honestly, it looks really good, and something Subway needs to consider adding to their menu. It’s a simple enough upgrade – just swap the bread out for chips — all things already in the store — and customers would definitely go nuts for it, if that TikTok is any indication.

I know Subway tends to stay in the sandwich lane, but judging by how tasty these nachos look, plus the ability to customize them to however folks want, it gives them a unique edge that they absolutely should consider taking advantage of.

Categories
Fast Food

To Survive, Some Subway Restaurants Are Selling Their Ingredients Like Groceries

With everyone confined to their homes during this pandemic, folks are trying to stock up on as much groceries as they can in order to avoid going outdoors while the threat of COVID-19 looms. Many restaurants have taken to transitioning into a corner store model, where they’re selling their excess inventory to members of the community in need of groceries.

Sandwich chain Subway is now offering a similar model in Orange County locations they’re calling Subway Grocery.

In an effort to help support Subway employees and give back to the local communities, Subway is tapping into their supplier connections and offering up a service where customers can directly order the meats, breads, cheeses, and produce used to craft sandwiches. The service also includes frozen soups, meat and cheese party platters, and cookies.

While originally a Subway in Long Beach, CA was one of the first to offer this service, many new locations throughout Orange County and Los Angeles have begun participating in Subway Grocery.

Yes, the question could be posed: Does anyone really want Subway produce? Just thinking of all those locations we’ve visited with oxidized avocados and slightly browned lettuce does make us hesitate for a hot second. However, with ingredients coming directly from a restaurant grade food supplier, the lackadaisical care from some locations is simply forgone. Should be a pretty safe bet if you want some fresh groceries without having to go to the supermarket chains.

Those looking to order from Subway’s Grocery service can place their order through the nearest participating location here. Pick up options include a contactless curbside pick up, restaurant pick up, or delivery to select areas.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Subway Testing A Meatless Meatball Sub With Beyond Meat

Subway’s classic meatball sub is a go-to move when dining at the quick-service restaurant, and starting this September, there will be a meatless version on the test market.

Officially partnering with Beyond Meat, Subway will be putting together a plant-based version of the sandwich that will look, feel, and mostly taste the same as its meaty counterpart.

As Beyond fans know, the “meat” is typically packed with protein, and this sub is no different, carrying 24 grams of protein per six incher.

While the new meatless meatball sub won’t be available at all Subway shops just yet, it will be available at 685 participating restaurants in the US and Canada, but only for a limited time trial.

The sandwich chain is already pretty veggie-friendly, but adding Beyond meat gives them a protein alternative that wasn’t there before.

Categories
Drinks Fast Food Health Products Sweets What's New

Subway and Halo Top Announce Their New Collab Milkshake

Photo: Subway

It appears to be the year of the healthy fast food brand, with restaurants from Burger King to Del Taco attempting to health-ify their food with options like plant based protein. The newest challenger to appear in the ring is Subway, who just announced their partnership with Halo Top and their plans to introduce a milkshake using Halo Top’s trademark low calorie, high protein ice cream.

Starting July 22nd, the milkshakes will be available in nearly 1,000 stores in six different test markets: Colorado Springs, Colorado; Hartford, Connecticut; Longview and Tyler, Texas; Salt Lake City, Utah; Toledo, Ohio; and West Palm Beach, Florida.

There’s three flavor options: Vanilla Bean, Chocolate, and Strawberry.

Halo Top made a splash in the ice cream market a few years back by offering pints of ice cream that could be shamelessly killed in one sitting, as each pint ranges from 280-360 calories and carries 20g of protein. Finally, there was a way to kill a pint in bed after a bad day and not just feel worse afterwards. Finally.

The new milkshake hopes to offer the same highs of a sweet treat without the lows of that shameful, bloated walk to the trash can with an empty pint. Each one carries 350 calories or less, 20g of protein, and 30% of your daily calcium intake.

As a Halo Top fanatic, this is the first thing that gave me an impulse to step in a Subway in years. If you’re in the test markets, make sure to go try one out, guilt-free, since I can’t.