Categories
Packaged Food

Trader Joe’s ‘Everything But The Elote’ Seasoning Bottles The Magic Of Street Corn

With the ever-popular Everything But The Bagel seasoning Trader Joe’s released not too long ago, the grocery store chain has decided to keep their seasoning blend momentum going with their newest addition to the spice aisle: Everything But Elote.

You can find a typical elote, seasoned corn on the cob, from street vendors in Mexico as well as some cities sprinkled throughout the United States. The corn on the cob is covered in mayonnaise, cotija cheese, chili powder, and finished with some lime juice.

Trader Joe’s seasoning blend boasts some salt, chili pepper, parmesan cheese, chipotle powder, dried cilantro, and cumin. Trader Joe’s mentions the idea for this item came after the success of both the Everything Bagel seasoning as well as the Organic Elote Corn Chip Dippers.

You can find this new blend at all participating Trader Joe’s locations across the US. We picked up a bottle ourselves, and so far its tasted fantastic on tacos, instant ramen, leftover chicken wings, and some strawberries Elie forgot to put his name on. It’s pretty amazing.

Categories
Design Hacks

13 Common Cooking Mistakes You Should Avoid In The Kitchen [Infographic]

Amateur cooks, myself included, tend to make mistakes here and there when it comes to cooking. Sure, mistakes happen, but they can drastically affect your final dish.

So how can we make the most of our kitchen experience?

Quid Corner cooked up a useful guide that shows us what the top 13 most common cooking mistakes made in the kitchen are and why we should avoid them. While a few of these are common sense for those with a modicum of experience in the kitchen, it’s always good for the less experienced to brush up on the basics.

Check out the infographic and see if it makes a difference the next time you’re in the kitchen!

Courtesy of: Quid Corner
Categories
Culture Video

Here’s Why We Pair Pepper With Salt In Our Food

We use salt and pepper every day to season our foods. As you spice up that bland piece of chicken on your fifth diet of the year, have you ever wondered how the black and white pairing came to be?

Popular YouTube Channel It’s Okay To Be Smart took a look at the history behind the two iconic seasonings.

Salt, as we all know, is an essential chemical compound to human diets. We need to consume a daily 6 grams to maintain blood pressure and other functions in our bodies. Early hunters and gatherers met this requirement with their animal diets. Raw blood and all.

As humans incorporated more plant-based foods into their diets, people began to discover different ways to harvest salt. Salt was commonly used to preserve food as well as accentuate other flavors like bitters, sweets, and umami.

So why do we use pepper, as opposed to hundreds of other spices that salt could be paired with?

Black pepper is from a flowering vine that originates from Southeast Asia called Piper nigrum.

Peppercorns became a very common ingredient in Indian cuisine for at least two millennia. Eventually, pepper was introduced to other countries, becoming a main commodity in the spice trade.

History believes that the popularity of black pepper came from King Louis XIV. The picky monarch demanded that his meals were to be “lightly seasoned,” only throwing salt and pepper on his food. The French cuisine that was developed in that period of time became the basis of much of what we eat today in the Western world.

So there you have it.

Imagine if King Louis preferred cinnamon instead? Food history could have drastically changed with the most minute of details.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss Products

Not Your Father’s Root Beer Adds A Much Stronger Drink To The Family

image001Beer isn’t for everyone. In fact, you might be surprised at how many people there are out there that flat out don’t like the taste, despite its crisp drinkability and very wide variety of refreshing flavors.

image002Damn, now I need a beer.

One company noticed a trend of regular drinks becoming “hard”, such as Mike’s Hard Lemonade and Redd’s Apple Cider. Small Town Brewery in Wauconda, Illinois, decided to throw their brewing hat into the ring when they made Not Your Father’s Root Beer, a delicious root beer-flavored alternative to the average can of beer.

After Small Town’s success with Not Your Father’s Root Beer and Not Your Father’s Ginger Ale, the brewery decided to bottle and manufacture their stronger version of the drink. While the mass produced version clocks in at 5.9% ABV (alcohol by volume), the brewery will begin mass producing their stronger variety, a version of NYFRB with a 10.7% ABV, nearly twice the amount in a regular NYFRB.

The initial success of NYFRB led to the stronger version being created, however it’s only available around the brewery, usually in cities and districts within an hour or so of the Chicago area. In order to keep the heavy beer hitters interested, Small Town will be selling the 10.7% ABV version in 22 oz. cans or “bombers”, at $7.99 a piece.

 

 

via Small Town Brewery

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

5 Disgusting Recipes From The First Ever Celebrity Cookbook

Gordon Ramsay would blush

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Long before the introduction of the tomato to Europe, Italy had a reputation for being a gourmand’s paradise. One of the most important sources for understanding ancient epicures is the collection of recipes known as Apicius de re coquinaria (roughly, Apicius on cooking). Apicius, a wealthy Roman of the 1st century C.E. who reputedly killed himself rather than eat cheaper food once he ran out of money, has gone down in history as the first celebrity chef. It’s unlikely, however, that he personally wrote any of the recipes in the collection, which probably dates to three centuries after Apicius’ untimely demise.

Many of Apicius’ recipes remain appetizing today (I recently helped Leftovers History select and research one tasty example). But others are better left to the dustbin of history. Here are 5 Apician recipes that we’d rather not try.

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via Wikimedia

1. To Improve a Broth

If your reaction to noticing that your soup has spoiled to the degree that it stinks is to dump a bunch of spices in it and then serve it to your friends, please let me know so I can never ever eat at your house.

If a broth has contracted a bad odor, place a vessel upside-down and fumigate it with laurel and cypress and before ventilating it, pour the broth in this vessel. If this does not help matters and if the taste is too pronounced, add honey and fresh spikenard to it; that will improve it.

2. Vegetable and Brain Pudding

There’s nothing wrong with eating organ meat, and I’m not even a particularly picky eater. But 5-year-old me would have had a hell of a tantrum if my mom decided to serve this dish for dinner.

Take vegetables, clean and wash, shred and cook them, cool them off and drain them. Take 4 calf’s brains, remove strings and cook them in the mortar. Put 6 scruples (a type of measure) of pepper, moisten with broth and crush fine; then add the brains, rub again and meanwhile add the vegetables, rubbing all the while, and make a fine paste of it. Thereupon break and add 8 eggs. Now add a glassful of broth, a glassful of wine, a glassful of raisin wine, taste this preparation. Oil the baking dish thoroughly and place it in the oven and when it is done sprinkle with pepper and serve.

disgusting_recipes_3

via Wikimedia

3. For Birds that Smell Strongly

There’s some scholarly debate over what “goatish” means in this recipe—is it just birds with a gamey flavor? Many Classicists, however, think that this recipe told cooks how to cover up the stench of rotting fowl. 

For birds of all kinds that have a goatish smell, add pepper, lovage, thyme, dry mint, sage, dates, honey, vinegar, wine, broth, oil, reduced must, mustard. The birds will be more luscious and nutritious, and the fat preserved, if you envelop them in a dough of flour and oil and bake them in the oven. Alternately, stuff the inside with crushed fresh olives, sew them up, and thus cook, then retire the cooked olives.

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via Wikimedia

4. To Make Spoiled Honey Good as New

Honey can actually stay good for a crazy long time, but you really don’t want to mess around with it when things go wrong.

How bad honey may be turned into a saleable article is to mix one part of the spoiled honey with two parts of good honey.

5. To Clarify Muddy Wine

No thanks, I’m good.

Put bean meal and the whites of three eggs in a mixing bowl. Mix thoroughly with a whip and add to the wine, stirring for a long time. The next day the wine will be clear.

Written by Caroline Wazer // History Buff // Recipes adapted from Joseph Dommers Vehling’s 1926 translations // Feature image via Wikimedia

Categories
Packaged Food

General Mills Is Getting Rid Of All Artificial Colors From Their Cereals

General-Mills-Cuts

General Mills has announced they’re getting rid of artificial ingredients. This means the company’s cereals will no longer feature all the bright colors at typically come with artificial flavors and colors.

No longer will the brand be associated with artificial dyes like Blue 1, Yellow 6 and Red 40. Among the cereals that will be affected with this change are Cocoa Puffs, Reese’s Puffs and Trix. Changes will be implemented by the end of this year.

According to General Mills, the cereal’s colors will now come from fruit and vegetable concentrates as well as spices.

Reeses-GM-Puffs

General Mills released a product shot of Reese’s Puffs as they look now with a projected look as to how they’ll look once the artificial coloring is removed and natural colors are utilized.

The two look pretty much identical.

However, cereals with blue and greens in them like Trix will no longer feature the two colors. The difficulty in replacing the artificial blues with a natural alternative means that General Mills is dropping the color entirely. No blue means no green, either.

Expect to find the new, more natural cereals in grocery store shelves sometime at the end of this year.

 

Categories
Products

This Death Star ‘Spice Grinder’ is Really Just a Grinder for Good Ol’ Mary Jane

death-star-grinder

Finding the perfect grinder changes everything — from maximizing the potency of your herbs to providing a hassle-free way of separating the sticky-icky. We’re talking spices of course, and we’re definitely not making any references to marijuana. 

That being said, this Death Star “Spice Grinder” is the perfect way to grind up herbs like rosemary, lavender and other such plants of choice. The outside is crafted from non-toxic polymer clay, while the grinder itself is made from metal — which, as most herb-crushing veterans know, is a must for any respectable grinder. It also features magnets to hold it shut, dimples underneath to keep it from rolling around, and is smaller than a baseball, maximizing its portability.

We recommend pairing this Star Wars-themed tool with a Nugtella Sandwich, because we know you’ll be hungry.

herb-grinder

star-wars-grinder

Star Wars Death Star Grinder, $22 @Etsy

PicThx Pyroteeze

Categories
Cravings Recipes

Chai Tea

Nothing says cozy for winter like Chai Tea. Well you can check out this recipe and make some on your own. No wants to pay those Starbucks prices anyways, pleaseeeee. (Thx Budget Bytes)