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Culture Design Food Trends News Technology

The Newest Food Emojis Have Been Revealed

Photo by: Omari Allen

Emojis, the colorful language inspired by our collective imaginations and invented by The Unicode Technical Committee, now have new food icons. The new emojis include: round waffles, a stick of butter, yerba mate in a gourd with a straw, an onion, bulb of garlic, a juice box, large ice cube and probably the most anticipated, falafel. Although you probably weren’t clamoring for each new option, the additions should nevertheless spice up your text life. 

Considering how prevalent emojis have become in how we communicate, the perfect emoji for a witty response always seems to be missing. The reason behind this lies in the rigorous emoji approval process. Emojis aren’t just updates made in some windowless room by someone sitting behind a computer, the process is actually very democratic. Anyone can submit an emoji suggestion to the Unicode Technical Committee. Meaning, the balut emoji you’ve always been wanting to text your friends is a possibility. You just have to follow these guidelines to submit a new emoji proposal

The guidelines are fairly straightforward, but the subsequent deliberation can be tedious. For example, the falafel emoji could’ve been three balls rather than a plateful. Emojis work as a language bridge, so it’s important that designs translate across cultural barriers. Designs also vary from platform to platform. Food is a particularly popular area for emoji enthusiasts, so it’s no surprise many want their favorite dish represented.

With that said, writing about food emojis has made me crave food food. I’m sure these new emojis will inspire many funny convos and hopefully more creative submissions to the committee. I look forward to witnessing the evolution of the emoji language. Who knows, maybe one day someone will create an emoji cafe.

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Hit-Or-Miss Now Trending

This Single Egg Became The Most-Liked Photo On Instagram

2019 has barely begun and an unknown account as appeared to accomplish the unthinkable: become the most-liked photo on Instagram. So what kind of celebrity could be behind such a behemoth post that’s garnered over 30 million likes through the course of 10 days? Is it Selena Gomez drinking another bottle of Coke, hoping to reclaim her title?

Nope, there’s no celebrity behind this. No brand pushing a new item. The most-liked photo on Instagram  has become a simple image of an un-cracked egg that may or may not be a stock photo from somewhere.

Instagram account @world_record_egg posted a photo on January 4 of a simple brown egg over a white background.

In a matter of days, the photo gained an inconceivable number of likes for an account that’s essentially a newcomer, eventually surpassing previous record holder Kylie Jenner’s 18 million likes post of her newborn, and then doubling it in a day.

At the time of publication, the egg photograph had more than 36 million likes on Instagram, with it expected to climb even higher in the days to come.

What’s funny is the @world_record_egg doesn’t have any previous posts before the egg photo. In fact, the entirety of the account seemed to be based around beating Jenner’s record.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

stormi webster 👼🏽

A post shared by Kylie (@kyliejenner) on

This can’t be the first time an account has attempted to set the world record for likes, but something about this egg has cracked the Instagram algorithm for success.

We’ll do some digging to see if there’s a story behind this phenomenon. In the meantime, the egg photo is gaining about 1 million likes each hour since yesterday as a sort of a snowball effect of success.

Perhaps in a few days, Jimmy Kimmel will announce to the world that he’s secretly running this account. Perhaps.

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Adventures Brand Cravings Culture Features FOODBEAST SPONSORED

Twitch Star OMGitsfirefoxx Talks Garlic Noodles & Becoming The Most Followed Female Livestreamer

How did one of the most watched females on Twitch get to the top, and how can she help Foodbeast create their own Livestream? Well, on our recurring interview show Just Warmin’ Up, our host Elie Ayrouth gets to learn exactly that! Enter: Sonja Reid.

Everything we do at FOODBEAST is through the lens of food. This gives us the opportunity to interact with amazing people that AREN’T necessarily in the “food industry.” In this sense, food becomes a unifying factor that connects everyone regardless of what they do for a living.

With that said, we’re excited to continue our FOODBEAST video series, Just Warmin’ Up, in collaboration with Nissin Cup Noodles®. This series spotlights young, up-and-coming entertainers and entrepreneurs riding their own wave to success.

In this episode, we meet Sonja Reid, AKA OMGITSFIREFOXX, who is currently the #1 female broadcaster on the popular live streaming and gaming site, Twitch.  

With an additional following of more than 1 million between Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, along with appearances on film and television paired with millions of livestream views on Twitch, it’s safe to say the livestreaming side of the Internet already knows who Sonja is.

With a commanding 779K Twitch followers, it’s no wonder why she’s already made the Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list. At this point it seems that the sky’s the limit for Sonja.  

It’s pretty inspiring to see someone follow their hobby and be able to make a career from it. Considering her track record, Sonja is clearly open to challenges.

As is customary in our JWU show, our guest often takes us on a journey following the interview. This time, FOODBEAST Editor-in-Chief, Elie Ayrouth and Sonja decide to compete in a special role reversal challenge that requires Sonja to act as Elie for a day as EIC, while Elie takes a seat in Sonja’s chair to host a livestream in front of her Twitch followers.  

“You eat food for a living, how hard can that be?” she scoffed as Elie explained the premise of the challenge.

Sonja jumped into the editor role with ease, approving story pitches and using her newfound power to instruct the FOODBEAST editorial staff on how to deliver some livestream challenge ideas.

Needless to say, Sonja did her best to find ways to torture Elie and essentially beat him at his own game.

Learn more about Sonja and life as a popular Twitch livestreamer in our latest episode of Just Warmin’ Up.


Created in partnership with Original Cup Noodles

Categories
Health

3 Things Happening To My Body After 24 Hours Of No Social Media

Day 2.

Yesterday I abruptly quit social media. Yes, the dude who co-owns a food company where social media is seemingly what keeps the lights on. Where social media has given Foodbeast’s roster of audio, written, photo and video content legs to be seen by up to a billion people every year — I quit using all of it cold turkey on February 1st.

Now, here are three things that happened to my body the first day I went dark:

1. My body absurdly tried to use Venmo as social media

I made a reference to social media as a drug yesterday. By no means am I the first to make that comparison, but never have I felt the embodiment of the addiction so absurdly as when I was taking a shit at work yesterday.

I sat on the toilet, conscientious of my posture, straightened my spine out, feet firmly on the floor making perfect perpendicular lines with the throne. I pulled my phone out of my pocket and into the crevice of my hand, the empty home screen had no social media notifications.

My fingers did their muscle memory thing anyways — they scrolled two screens over to where Instagram used to be, my crack of choice, and sure enough I thumb tapped an empty block of pixels on the home page where the purple and yellow icon once was. My mind reminded me of the month-long-journey I was on, and my body accepted the fact that Facebook and Twitter weren’t options during my bathroom time.

“What did I eat last night?” I wondered, mainly because I had the mental capacity to do so now. My emails were checked, I wasn’t in an endless hole of sifting through Tweets, mindlessly scrolling past Facebook status updates of friends — wait. Wait. I’m…

venmo-socialmedia

My fucking finger had found Venmo. Yes, the mobile payment app to quickly transact money between friends. A fucking app that PayPal owns. My body was thirsting for social media so hard I was mindlessly scrolling through monetary transactions my “friends” were making between each other, sometimes sprinkled with cryptic reasonings for said transactions. Sherry had paid Tommy for Lakers tickets. Damn, Sherry went to a Lakers game?! Jennifer paid her boyfriend for “sushi,” damn, they going dutch in that relationship?! Jason paid someone ‘private’ for three tree emojis — is Jason’s landscaper on Venmo now?!

I closed Venmo immediately and deleted it from my phone.

social-media-venmo

Don’t get me wrong, I use Venmo too. It’s an awesome tool that allows you to make use of the one friend who may have cash in a situation, or generally speed up transactions. On the other hand, there’s tons to be said about Venmo eroding a lot of social monetary interactions that end up making already fickle, cheap people more fickle, isolated and cheap.

Ever thought a friend was paying for your milkshake in a drive thru, only to have him send you a payment request once he’s not in your face for $3.79 and a memo “the boys getttin sugar waaaasted.” No Keith, I’m not getting sugar wasted with you any fucking longer. Social constructs say I pay for a meal, you pay for a meal — friends don’t need to go dutch on milkshakes. I have a job. You have a job. If you can’t buy your friend a 4-dollar milkshake because you’re closer to the drive thru window, we shouldn’t be driving around burning fuel any longer. We should go park your gas guzzler back home and comb through your finances.

I rant, but Venmo is a social media tool and my body sniffed it out like a junkie. I hadn’t thought to delete it in my initial sweep, but my body reminded me that I still had a bottle of social media pills in a new hiding place. Bye Venmo, at least until I know how to use you properly.

 

1.5. My body wanted mariscos without taking a picture

I still gotta eat. If you find yourself in Orange County, CA and want the best Mexican food for the price and the decor reminscent of an El Torito and Mimi’s Cafe’s offspring, go to Ostioneria Bahia 2. In fact, I was so enthralled with my meal I didn’t take a single worthy picture. A little bit of THC (not served at the restaurant), a couple metallic margaritas (first sip was awful, second sip was heavenly), an al pastor burrito, and of course, the star of the show: shrimp a la diabla.

Orders these as a plate, or in a quesadilla and I guarantee your mouth hole will thank you later (the other hole will beg for mercy, but it all works out in the end):

Since I have no pictures of my own, here’s a few from Yelp that I probably could have just lied and said I took:

2. I tried to access Facebook 39 times at work in 6 hours

I knew I would do it too, so by the second time I had tried to meaninglessly reward my act of responding to an email with a quick hit of “f-a-c-e-b….” I got up from my chair, grabbed some sticky notes from my social media manager’s desk, and slapped one on my monitor. Every time I stopped working to go to Facebook or Instagram on my phone or computer, I would tally it on the sticky with a pen. By 3pm I had notched 39 attempts at social media.

One particularly interesting moment was when Geoff swung by my desk to discuss an upcoming advertising campaign. Mid conversation, literally while words were coming out of my mouth about budget and view counts, I found myself back at this login screen:

facebook-login

Not sure what privacy law they’re breaking here, but there was my face AND a red dot with 31 notifications that I’m “missing out on.” I wasn’t logged in, yet Facebook was telling whoever was using my computer that Elie had many notifications he was missing on. 31 things, specifically.

My body was actively going through the motions of attempting to reach Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. In the morning, it was every couple minutes. By the end of the day, it was every half hour that muscle memory would drive me to try and access Facebook.

3. I no longer felt physically attached to my charging cable 

social-media-space

We all feel “tethered to our phones,” but I didn’t realize said metaphorical description was actually a literal one.

Tethering something involves connecting one device to another. An astronaut is tethered to their ship in space because they need the connection to deliver a clean stream of oxygen to their mask and ample amounts of power to their suit. Without the tether, they’d float away into the abyss of space. They would eventually die without oxygen.

phone-charger

Ever been out of your house long enough that you start frantically looking for where your next phone charge will come from? Don’t you start feeling like the battery itself? Say you’re at 15% at the beginning of the day and you have a bunch of errands to run — tell me you don’t start feeling anxious that you might be caught out in the world without a phone. It’s almost as if our bodies are at 15% also. What if I get lost? What if someone calls? What do I do at red lights? How do I listen to podcasts?

Ever been in an airport and watch grown adults tethered to a wall, wires intertwined, sitting Indian-style on a dirty floor trying to get their fix–err, charge? I’ve been at plenty of food events, conventions and general bouts of walking around a city like New York where I have an external battery pack in my back pocket and an extra long 3-foot charging cable connected to my phone. I look like a fuckin’ Jetson and I’m not alone.

But today, I didn’t seem to care. I left to work in the morning with 10% charge. Outside of a few texts, calls, and an email check — my phone miraculously was at 5% by the end of the day. When I moved around the office, I no longer felt obligated to bring my phone everywhere. The first couple times I walked to the water cooler I had my phone in my pocket out of sheer habit. But by the 3rd piss of the day, and walking to lunch, I didn’t seem to need my phone, so I left it at my desk like a growing child I knew could one day take care of his or herself.


Thank you so much to all who e-mailed me yesterday!

Again, I can’t read anything y’all are saying on social media, even if these posts get shared on Facebook, Twitter or talked about on Instagram. What I do know is, those of you who emailed elie@foodbeast.com have been incredibly eloquent, personal and really inspiring to read. Even if you’re just saying hello, feel free to drop me a line — and I really appreciate you following along!

P.S., this wasn’t my original intent…but a lot of you have sent such incredible emails, if you want me to publish any of them in future articles, please leave a note at the end that explains that. It can be a simple ending note “I give you permission to answer this email publicly.” I don’t know if I ever would, but it started feeling like a letter-to-the-editor type thing. My email is personal though, and if you don’t mention that I will assume it’s a completely private conversation between the two of us. 

Categories
Health

I’m A Food Social Media Entrepreneur And I Just Quit All Social Media

Day 1.

This is weird for me to write. Let me explain.

I’m a 29-year-old co-founder of Foodbeast, a website and media company whose content is seen by over a billion people a year. Our articles are read on Foodbeast.com and our videos are viewed on Facebook, YouTube and Instagram. We have some premiere food and travel shows in our network now. My work day consists of answering emails, thinking of content ideas, client relations and growing our audience.

I started Foodbeast close to 10 years ago as a blog. It was a time prior to Facebook’s newsfeed, before Instagram was a seed in Kevin Systrom’s entrepreneurial ballsack — in short, social media as we know it did not exist.

I was still in college at the time and had a passion for writing and telling stories in any medium I could. Whether I was blogging about my friend attempting to eat 30 Sloppy Joes in one sitting inside a school cafeteria, the new burgers at Carl’s Jr., or using a MiniDV cam to film myself burning the roof of my mouth on hot pot the first time — I just wanted to tell stories I cared about.

I wanted to discuss food sans all the pretentiousness, because the proposition of Food Network being the sole voice for food was starting to feel stale to me. Fast forward 10 years later, Foodbeast is a humble company of creators, social media managers, ad sales, writers and video producers that continue to live out that vision. To say we owe a LOT to social media would be an understatement. Before Facebook and YouTube, our monthly audience maxed out at 2 million people a month. That’s a LOT of people, don’t get me wrong, but when technology and hackers like Mark Zuckerberg, and the bros behind YouTube gave us some bigger microphones to tell our stories through, our audience ballooned. For a self-funded, entirely private company like Foodbeast, social media gave us an opportunity and voice we likely wouldn’t have had without it.

That said, I just deleted Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Snapchat from my phone. Any social application that gives me access to a seemingly unlimited amount of people, I’ve removed. Only 1-on-1 conversations. Text and phone is cool. No “social validations” for a while. No quick social media dopamine hits to vacantly boost my mood when people like or view my “content.” No addictive social validation loop. Gone:

I didn’t run this decision by my business partners, my family — I didn’t want to make a symbolic gesture by announcing “going dark” on all my social feeds by uploading some dumb all black photo. I’m obviously not looking to advocate for the eradication of the amazing tool that social media is — my business wouldn’t have succeeded without it. With social media I have the ability to, within seconds, speak to anyone on fucking planet Earth. It’s an amazing tool, I want to use it, but I no longer feel like I have any control over it.

Fuck, I literally just switched tabs while writing this — entirely muscle memory — to check Facebook. The above is literally a screenshot, in real time, of me stopping the task at hand and going to Facebook. Good thing I’ve logged out of all of it. But seriously, I just hot-keyed my keyboard to spawn up a new tab and began typing ‘F-A….’

This morning, on our bi-weekly Katchup podcast I do with my co-founder Geoff Kutnick, the topic was the Most Important Food Instagrammers of 2018. I had been planning to discuss my research, interviews and surveys I’d accumulated over the past couple weeks. Who’s the most important? Who takes the best photos? Who has the best engagement? My goal was to finish the article before the podcast went live. I didn’t. I must have been too busy to finish… hm.

If you listen to the podcast, you’ll notice that I nearly crack and lose it towards the end as I describe Facebook “not giving a fuck about you.” The one bit of my research that stuck with me so profusely happened to come from a random YouTube video featuring ex-Facebook execs talking about social media.

The following video reveals both Sean Parker (ex-President of Facebook) and Chamath Palihapitiya (former Facebook exec and current Golden State Warriors co-owner) having immense regret for growing the Facebook platform.

“I think we have created tools that are ripping apart the social fabric of how society works,” Palihapitiya said in front of students at Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Alright Chamath, you sound CRAZY, dawg. Easy to sit on your billions and say you don’t “do” social media now. But…

…then something clicked for me.

I know these tools inside and out: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. They’re crucial and give us a wealth of power and communication. But who’s really in charge? I hate to call social media a drug, in fear of sounding like my mom circa the grade school years telling me my hours of Nintendo were turning my brain to mush, but fuck dude, I can’t take a shit without passively scrolling Instagram. I’d more rather have my phone on the toilet than toilet paper — at least I have my phone to look up alternatives to wiping my ass when the TP is depleted.

I can’t even go to the gym without checking Twitter for that fire Lavar Ball Tweet. I reward every task on my work ‘to-do’ list with a quick “hit” of social media. H ow come no one has checked me into fucking rehab yet?!

A study in 2016 (yeah, it’s two years old but it’s the first study that came up in Google, sue me) says the typical cellphone user touches his or her phone 2,617 times every day. Bruh. That’s a TYPICAL person. And that’s an OLD study.

Psychological and mental health aside of living within the walls of a digital world for a majority of your day, the physicality of my neck crane-ing over 5+ cumulative hours a day actively using my phone while I wait for people to like my Instagram photo is fastidiously putting a herniated disc into my neck. Truly, my neck hasn’t stopped hurting for the past couple years.

Bruh, it hasn’t been but a couple hours, but speak of the devil:

I’ve found I haven’t been able to write like I used to. I’ll get 400 words in and my mind will find some unexplainable reason that I must check Instagram. An hour of scrolling later, I forgot what I was writing about, have jumped to Facebook, ignored my girlfriend’s texts and cracked my neck three times since there’s no “healthy” way for you to posture looking at a 4 inch screen on a couch.

I haven’t published a memorable article on Foodbeast in the past year or so. It took me “weeks” to get 80% done on three different articles, tens more in drafts. I even went on a “spiritual food journey” during a recent trip to Seattle and left my phone in my room for 24 hours. I documented every food I ate and person I encountered in a journal. A spiral-bound book of blank paper and a pen that ejaculates ink is what people used to use to document memories. It was brilliant day. It was eye opening. I felt like Bourdain on his third book. On the 25th hour when I sat down to write about my day sans-phone, I got two sentences in to my recollection, got distracted by a glowing notification on Instagram and never looked back at that draft.

It’s been five months since then.

It’s February 1st now. I’ll use social media again in March. I won’t be able to tell if people are “commenting” on this story, or the subsequent journal entries I’ll produce this month, but you can email me what you think.

I’d love to hear if I’m crazy. Will my food taste better now? Will my mind change? Does your neck hurt, too? Do you get anxiety about taking shits without your phone? Who will I share my food photos with? Have you ever lost your iPhone for a few hours and felt like you were completely void of meaning and direction in your day? E-mail me. Don’t Tweet me, don’t DM me on Instagram. I can’t see your messages on Facebook — but I can see your e-mails. My email is: elie@foodbeast.com

My Managing Editor didn’t proof this story. There may be typos. Like I said, I haven’t written in a long, long time. I’ve decided not to wait until March to journal my story, ’cause when I pick up the pipe again, I may just forget what the fuck it is I wanted to say.

Now you see why this is weird for me to write. I’ll see you tomorrow with more.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss Humor Technology

“Hotdog Hell” Chrome Extension Replaces Facebook Images With Dancing Hot Dog Filter

By now you’ve probably seen Snapchat’s Dancing Hot Dog augmented reality filter. The animated, breakdancing hot dog that you can place on objects in your environment is quickly becoming this summer’s hottest meme.

While the concept of augmented reality is pretty incredible, some might consider the dancing hot dog as Snapchat’s latest attempt to stay relevant.

Luckily enough, the Snapchat’s dancing hot dog became so popular  — or loathed, depending on who you’re asking — that someone created a downloadable Google Chrome extension that replaces every image on Facebook with an image of the now famous dancing hot dog.

So, if you’re sick of your friend’s traffic selfie posts on Facebook, this “productivity extension,” will give you a break. I downloaded it, and it provided some much needed entertainment.

The extension, aptly named Hotdog Hell, was released on July 10, and now has more than 296 weekly users.

The extension’s developer, an 18-year old mathematics and computer science major, named Kevin Chen, said he created the extension after he fell in love with the vitality behind the bizarre filter.

“I saw the hotdog on Snapchat; a couple of my friends were sending it, and then people started putting it in random memes. It was just so utterly bizarre, and I loved it,” Chen said.

The two-week old extension is now Chen’s first project developed for public consumption on the Google Chrome web store. Still, the attention the “app” is generating was unexpected, according to Chen.

“Definitely exploded a lot more than I thought it would,” he said. ” I was pretty shocked on that first day, and I’m really happy that such an absurd meme gained so much traction.”

What’s interesting is that Hotdog Hell is categorized as a “productivity extension,” which undermines the silliness behind it, but also capitalizes on the meme’s absurdity and humor.

Chen said there was a conscious effort to make the joke of it being a “productivity extension” because it does make Facebook, “significantly harder to use.” Maybe that’s a good thing for some people.

While it seems the Dancing Hot Dog has become the Internet’s hottest meme character, there’s no telling exactly how Snapchat — the originator of the hot dog character — will react.

Although, Chen doesn’t seem worried, pointing to how viral the meme has become.

“So far, I haven’t been contacted by anyone from Snapchat about it, and I think at this point,” Chen continues, “the hot dog has a life of its own.”

Categories
Alcohol Beer Drinks

Brewery Creates First ‘Beer For Women’ And The Internet Tore Them Apart

#beerforher #beerforwomen #premium #aurosa

A post shared by Aurosa (@aurosa_official) on

A Czech brewery may have set out with good intentions, however, a product they have created has become the target of the full sarcastic rage of the Internet.

Aurosa released a beverage they call the first ever “beer for her.” While that was enough to land themselves in an uncomfortable situation, the company dug themselves deeper by calling the beverage a “representation of a woman’s strength and a girl’s tenderness” reports BroBible. Yep, this includes flowers, dresses, jewelry, and fancy tablecloths in nearly all of the product shots. You know, things they believed could only be associated with women.

The Internet immediately took action, blasting Aurosa on social media. Here are some shining examples.

Wonder if they’ll stick to their guns and launch this controversial brew, or if they’ll pull it and it becomes a distant memory of what we presume they believed to be a clever idea.

Categories
Fast Food Features

Arby’s Is Lowkey Crushing The Social Media Game

Arby’s is crushing the social media game.

Don’t get me wrong, tons of fast food channels boast impressive food photography and mouthwatering video assets. If you’ve got fast food money, you kind of have to spend a fair chunk of it on taking dope product shots and spearheading videos that make your customer base salivate.

Arby’s, on the other hand, seems to focus on the pop culture humor, creativity, and hilarious captions. And by God, it’s working.

The fast food sandwich company has been around since the ‘60s, serving people for more than half a century. They’re probably best known for serving meaty sandwiches like brisket, corned beef, steak, roast beef, and chicken – with the occasional venison. Who would have guessed, as we indulge ourselves on some meaty menu offerings, that this same humble chain could be so adept at social media?

Let’s take a journey to the world of fast food content, in a vast ocean of brands and influencers, and see what the popular sandwich chain is cooking up best amongst them.

With the recent release of the wildly popular Nintendo Switch’s first game, The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, hardcore fans and casual gamers alike spoke nonstop of the newest installment in the Zelda series. While still a niche audience, Arby’s posted this creative photo of the game’s main character Link standing in the foreground before an open spit with a giant chunk of bone-in meat roasting over the flame.

The imagery is created with pristine cardboard cutouts, boasting the most intricate of details. In the background? Arby’s new Pork Belly sandwiches.

Arby’s took the one product they’re promoting and made it a secondary subject in the photograph. For the art. Pretty bold move. Let’s see how it played out.

The post garnered 66,000 likes, 14,000 shares, and 3,500 comments — the top two saying something positive or simply engaging with he brand rather than slinging shade.

Now I can’t speak for every fast food social media post since the beginning of platforms like Facebook and Instagram, but I don’t see many fast food joints displaying such creativity. Looking at you, Carl’s Jr.

Don’t get me wrong, there’s plenty of creativity in the fast food space. But Arby’s just took it to another level.

Sure, places like Carl’s Jr. crush the food photography game with majestic photos (though their burgers IRL are a different story), but in a world where food porn has become so saturated, the jaded consumer tends to glance over yet “another burger shot.”

While we’re on the subject of creativity, it’s actually quite rare to find a solo food photo in Arby’s library of visual posts.

You may think that because Arby’s constant posting of pop-culture art and videos, it is some sort of overcompensation for dull food. But I think these food photos will disagree with that sentiment.

Not bad, right? The meaty burger reminds us of something we’d find in a greasy local bbq joint. Not a complaint at all.

Practically every photo either features some kind of unique artwork referencing popular culture or a whimsical stop motion video like this one:

Because each post clearly shows an abundance of quality, the channel doesn’t really post more than once a day. In fact, it could even be two or three before new content shows up. Viewers don’t like being bombarded with the same type of content 10-20 times in a single day.

Then, there’s engagement with the fanbase.

More often than not, the top comment of a fast food post will be a customer complaint.

Arby’s posts, however, always seem to garner some kind of acclaim when it comes to their feed. Each photo and video boasts thousands of comments. Most are positive. A rare sight, really, especially with all the fast food haters Facebook harbors.

So until the day other fast food joints start treating their customers like peers, rather than customers, Arby’s will continue to crush the social media space with their outlandish shorts and their innovative imagery.

Arby’s doesn’t look like they’ll be relying on heavy celebrity endorsements, sexy models, a “cleaner” menu, or gimmicky beverage items anywhere in the near future. To paraphrase Nick Offerman’s beloved Ron Swanson on Parks and Recreation: It’s meat on a bun with nothing. Doesn’t get simpler than that.

The bar has been set for all you fast food companies out there. If you look up, you can see Arby’s leaping majestically over it.