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Health Hit-Or-Miss Now Trending

Chicken Sashimi Is A Real Thing, And The Internet Is Freaking Out

Chicken Sashimi isn’t a very common dish in the U.S. because the thought of salmonella poisoning immediately invades your brain, but it is real, and apparently can be safe.

Food and Wine chimed in on this Japanese delicacy, asking the question if eating raw chicken is ever a good idea.

It’s a great article, as they consulted a dietician, and pointed out that it is popular in Japan, though only done at a couple of places in the U.S. They stressed that you better be told every single small detail about how that chicken was raised, handled, prepared, and served, because you don’t want to be served raw chicken that’s anything less than perfect, from top to bottom.

If you are sure that you are getting the highest quality chicken and have zero reservations about the raw dish in front of you, then you could be OK, but people on Twitter did not care, and were not down to get anywhere near a raw chicken plate.

When Food and Wine reposted the article on September 5, Twitter users went off:

The Obvious Meme

Migos Does Not Approve

Simon Makes His Return

Diarrhea of The Thoughts

Some Weren’t Sticking Around

I feel ya, Adam

Response From The Sunken Place

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As someone who went through a pretty rough week of Salmonella poisoning, I probably won’t channel my inner daredevil for this sashimi, no matter how safe it is.

At this moment, I’m with all y’all, and will refer to Gordon Ramsay:

Featured pic via Food and Wine Twitter

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Culture Video

Watch American Kids Try Japanese Food For The First Time

Japanese food is definitely one of our go-to dinner choices after a long day at work. While the thought of a Japanese dinner leaves our mouths salivating, there are a ton of people who haven’t tried the cuisine before.

WatchCut Video‘s latest video has a bunch of American kids trying Japanese food for the first time in their young lives.

The dishes featured included: miso soup, Natto Gohan (fermented soybeans), sashimi (raw fish), daikon (pickled radish), umeboshi (pickled plums), Udon noodles, shrimp tempura, and Oshiruko (red bean soup & mochi).

While a savory feast for those familiar, these dishes can often come off as strange and off-putting to children unfamiliar with the cuisine. Still, props to these kids for giving the food a fair shake. Plus, there’s a hilarious B Plot where no one can figure out how to use the chopsticks.

Check out the adorable video and see if you can pass up some Japanese food for dinner.

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#foodbeast FOODBEAST Hit-Or-Miss

Here’s A Breakdown of Raw Dishes, So You Don’t Feel Like a Noob When Ordering Them

Have you ever been to a restaurant and just stared at the menu in silence wondering what on Earth the strange terms were in front of you? You’re not alone. There seems to be a fancy name for everything these days, but a category of foods where this is extremely apparent is raw fish and meat dishes. It turns out there is a marked difference between tartare, ceviche, and crudo. Who knew?

Here’s a breakdown of some raw dishes you might find, so you can navigate that menu like a pro.

Carpaccio

beef carpaccio

Traditional carpaccio is made with either fish or beef, with the most popular renditions using beef sirloin or tuna. However, this dish is increasingly being catered towards vegetarians, employing veggies like zucchini or cucumber. Carnivorous or not, the determining factor of carpaccio is definitely how thin each piece is, so when you see a raw dish with laser thin slices, you’ll know what it is.

Tartare

steak tartare

Tartare originally gained its namesake for being a dish that used tartar sauce, but after years of modifications, the standard application of this dish no longer uses the notorious sauce. You can find this dish made with fish pretty much anywhere since it’s considered “trendy,” but you should really head to your local French restaurant and get steak tartare served with rye bread because that shit is bomb. Especially because some places will add an egg yolk for that extra yolk porn.

Ceviche

peruvian ceviche

Ceviche is a Latin American-inspired dish guaranteed to be on the menu at your nearest Peruvian restaurant or place that takes great pride in their fresh fish selection. Each piece of raw fish destined for ceviche spends several hours in a nice lemon-lime, citrus juice bath. The fish is then traditionally served with sweet potato or avocado in its own delicious juices, and garnished with onion or chili peppers. The acidity gives the fish an appearance of being cooked, but citrus doesn’t get rid of bacteria so if you’re making this dish at home, be sure to use the freshest seafood possible.

Crudo

fluke crudo

Crudo is probably the simplest of all these dishes, and literally means “raw” in Italian. Basically all you need for a crudo is raw fish, olive oil, and a splash of lemon. Considering there’s only three ingredients, I kind of feel like this dish can be a hoax, since depending on the place, it can be devastatingly overpriced. However, this dish can be beautiful if the chef likes to take liberties with their plating.

Gravlax

gravlax

There are few Nordic foods that have become mainstream in Western cuisine, but gravlax is definitely one of them. Gravlax is made by taking the freshest salmon you can find (literally, the dish was created by fishermen, so you have some competition), and curing it with salt, sugar, and dill. After curing for a few days, the fish is typically served atop rye bread with some sort of sauce. Because we like to Americanize everything, gravlax is also commonly eaten with bagels as an alternative to lox.

Poke

hawaiian poke

Poke, also known as a raw fish salad, is probably one of the hottest dishes on the menu right now and we have Hawaii to thank. The dish had some pretty humble beginnings, starting out as a simple snack amongst fishermen while they were waiting for the next catch. Today, there are restaurants across the country that focus solely on poke, serving it atop sushi rice with tons of fresh veggies. The fish is typically seasoned fairly simply, with soy sauce and sesame oil as the base.

Sashimi

sashimi

Sashimi is pretty much sliced, raw fish served on a plate. You can obviously find this at a sushi establishment as an alternative to a roll, but if a restaurant is pretty stoked about a fresh catch, they’ll often let the flavors of the fish do the talking and serve it plain regardless of the cuisine. Sashimi originated in Japan, and is considered one of the highest delicacies, as only the freshest, most quality fish is used.

Nigiri

nigiri

Nigiri is essentially sashimi, but served over rice in bite-sized pieces. It’s always a mystery to us how they make those little mounds of rice so perfect, but such is the life of a good sushi chef.

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Cravings

Learn How To Make A Santa Claus Sushi Roll

Santa-Sushi-Make-Sushi

With the Christmas only a few days away, folks are scrambling to find some creative recipes to entertain friends and family with. What better to impress than Santa Sushi?

Our pal Make Sushi created this festive recipe that combines Japanese cuisine with the iconic Christmas figure. All you need are three crab sticks, a piece of Sashimi-grade tuna steak, two boiled carrots, cooked white sushi rice, cooked pink sushi rice, several Nori sheets, a sharp knife and a cutting board.

Check out the video below or go to Make Sushi’s site to see the complete recipe in extensive detail. Hopefully when we try our hand at this, it doesn’t come out looking like Krampus.

Sushi Santa || #FoodbeastFamily

Here's how to make a sushi santa! #Foodbeast Make Sushi

Posted by Foodbeast on Thursday, December 10, 2015

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Hit-Or-Miss

12 Unexpected Foods You Can Eat Raw And How To Do So Without Dying

While many health-conscious folks are into their raw and juice diets, others choose to incorporate uncooked foods without thinking twice. We’re down either way. Although chowing on any food that’s normally cooked will always pose some risk. Here are a few common (and some unusual) eats you’ll want to think twice about.

Chicken

cutruzzula-cu0626-chicken-main-tease

In Japan, chicken sashimi isn’t a big deal. So, why do Americans freak out over uncooked poultry? The issue has to do with how large quantities are farmed and butchered under less than ideal conditions. Because of this, reports of salmonella poisoning are higher domestically. Restaurants that source chickens from farms with organic, free-range and exceptionally sanitary practices when processing are a safer bet.

Nutmeg

Nutmeg-ground-main-or-closeup

This PSL spice base shows no signs of danger, so long as it’s eaten in moderation. Taking in extreme quantities may end in myristicin poisoning, which can result in memory loss and visual distortions.

Fesikh

dead-fish

This fermented, Egyptian fish is fine to dine on. Of course, that’s assuming you dry it in the sun or ferment in salt for a whole year. Bad things (Botulism, anyone?) will come to those who don’t wait.

Ackee 

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It looks harmless enough, right? Wrong! Ensure it’s ripe before consuming. And avoid the black seeds at all costs, unless you desire something called Jamaican vomiting sickness. Ew.

Steak

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Many people still believe having steak that isn’t cooked to “no pink” status is dangerous. It’s one hell of a misconception. Tasty examples of raw cow include beef carpaccio and steak tartare. Like most things you pay good money for, leave it to a well-seasoned chef to prepare this. They’ll serve those dishes using higher quality meat.

See: We Ate The 12 Most Bizarre Things You Could Find In LA, Silkworms And Crickets Included

Potato 

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Raw potatoes are about as exciting as gnawing on celery. But if you’re as desperate as Matt Damon in The Martian, go right ahead. Be sure to avoid any green ones, though. Glycoalkaloids found in these can cause diarrhea or put you in a coma.

Fugu (aka Puffer) Fish 

Aloha Fukuoka! Yanagibashi Market

If you’ve got an expert fish monger, you’re good to go. Just have them discard the liver and internal organs before they make you ill. Cyanide has nothing on fugu poison: it’s 1,200 times more deadly.

Rhubarb 

rhubarb

Normally pickled or baked into pies, this leafy plant contains a poison known as oxalic acid. This only becomes a concern, however, when had in large amounts. I don’t know anybody who goes crazy eating this vegetable, so don’t be the first.

Sushi

Sushi4

A general guideline sushi purists have (besides never, ever ordering rolls) has to do with cleanliness. If they think for a second that an establishment is less than spotless, they won’t dine there. Same goes for the seafood. Busy sushi bars go through fish quicker, meaning fresher seafood in rotation. On a medical note, the Food and Drug Administration dictates that sushi grade fish be kept at freezing temperatures to ward off parasites.

Starfruit  

starfruit-ftr

As pretty as it sounds, you should probably only try starfruit if you have strong kidneys. Impaired kidneys can’t filter out neurotoxins, making starfruit and its oxalic acid bad news for weak systems. Side effects include vomiting, convulsions, and mental confusion.

Elderberries 

elderberry

This Harry Potter-esque item should be consumed fully ripened, minus the leaves, twigs, seeds and roots. Ingesting them too soon could mean cyanide poisoning.

Sannakji 

sannakji

I’d advise you to cover this raw Korean dish with extra sesame oil and chew like crazy. Remember: they’re served alive. If they fight back and attach themselves to your insides, you’ll choke! But man, would that make for a great story.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

The Only Sushi Cheat Sheet You’ll Ever Need [Infographic]

Unless you’re an expert for aficionado, sushi can be scary. With so many options to choose from, it can be overwhelming trying to decide what kind of sushi to try first.

Take Lessons created a sushi cheat sheet that details all the popular rolls, ingredients and etiquettes. Customers can now have an idea of what’s appropriate or inappropriate when dining at an authentic sushi restaurant. They even threw popular sushi-centric vocabulary for those interested in immersing themselves.

Check out the graphic below.

Sushi-Complete-Guide

 

Image: Take Lessons

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Does Adding Mayo Upgrade Cheap Tuna Sashimi to Expensive Toro? We Put It To The Test!

tuna

Tuna sashimi is one of the most popular dishes offered at sushi restaurants. However, like beef, tuna comes in different cuts and have various price ranges. The most expensive cut is toro, which comes from the underbelly of the tuna. Depending on the quality and the part of the belly, the highest grade, known at “otoro”, can go up to $60 per pound.

However, not everyone can afford splurging on high quality sushi all the time. That’s why when our friends over at RocketNews24 tested a rumor that adding mayonnaise to regular tuna turns it into toro and found success, we had to try it too!

We started by buying the cheapest cut of tuna we could find at a local Japanese supermarket.

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We then sliced it into pieces with our superb (no, not really) knife cutting skills.

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After that, we put the sliced tuna into a mixing bowl and added a small amount of tuna and mayonnaise.

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We prefer using Japanese-style mayonnaise since we think the texture and flavor would be better for this particular dish.

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Make sure to not add too much mayo, you only need to add enough to lightly coat each piece. After that, we covered it with plastic wrap and threw it in the fridge for about three hours. Here was the result.

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Compare before and after.

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After that came the taste test. The verdict? SUCCESS! The tuna marinated with mayonnaise was much for flavorful, creamy, and tender. While not perfect, the taste and texture definitely resembled toro. The only person on our staff who believed there was no difference was our managing editor Waylae Gregoire, our staff food snob.

Written by Benny Luo of NextShark

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Hit-Or-Miss

This Sneaky Sashimi Bowl Is Actually A Cake In Disguise

sashimicake03

There’s nothing comparable to a good bowl of sashimi over rice. The Japanese dish of raw fish has become a popular staple for those looking for something light and fresh, that isn’t rolled in seaweed. However, the next time you order a bowl of your favorite tuna cut, you might want to double check before biting into it. It could just be a cake pretending.

A local bakery in Shinjuku, Japan, is known for their impressive cake models. The bakery uses popular Japanese dishes as a template for their cakes. Honestly, you couldn’t tell them apart by looking.

Take this sashimi bowl, for example.

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Made with different pastry components, the cake is layered with candy colored ingredients to create the illusion of a well-stacked bowl of sashimi. This includes cucumbers, shredded seaweed and even a garnish of lettuce .

However, it’s all sweets.

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Under the layer of fanciful Japanese condiments, one will discover nothing more than mousse below the surface. The tuna is made from a red gelatin that’s carefully sliced. The seaweed and cucumbers are black and white chocolates, respectively. Even the rice is made from a colored mousse.

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Ah, you just gotta love Japan.