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Famous Safe-To-Eat Cookie Dough Shop Sued For Food Poisoning

At the beginning of this year, NYC raw cookie dough shop made headlines for selling a safe-to-eat cookie dough. Unfortunately, some customers are claiming that the treat isn’t as free from food-borne pathogens as it claims to be.

The lawsuit was filed in a Manhattan federal court after plaintiffs Julia Canigiani and Lauren Byrne ate at the popular establishment, according to Bloomberg. Canigiani got a cookie dough ice cream sandwich, while Byrne got a scoop of M&M’s cookie dough. The suit then claims that Canigiani got sick within 15 minutes, experiencing stomach pains, nausea, and diarrhea. Byrne also was afflicted with a stomach ache, heartburn, and nausea.

As proof that it wasn’t just them getting sick, the two plaintiffs also cited eight Yelp reviews where people claimed to get sick from the cookie dough. It’s unclear whether the veracity of those reviews was verified first, however.

Dō claims that their products are perfectly safe to consume and that they stand behind their claims. Their dough is made with heat-treated flour and pasteurized egg, which should eliminate primary food safety concerns regarding food-borne pathogens. Of course, there are other vectors for possible contamination. Since Canigiani reported falling ill within 15 minutes, the only bacteria that can cause disease close to that time limit is Staphylococcus aureus, which is linked to improper food handling. Not even salmonella, which requires a 6 hour incubation period in the stomach, comes close to Canigiani’s time window.

It is also possible that something else the plaintiffs ate triggered the food poisoning around the same time that they went to the cookie dough store. However, it’s unknown what else the two of them ate that day or on previous days, so it would be hard to tell.

Regardless, if the plaintiffs win their lawsuit and Dō is proven to have been at fault, it could cause damages exceeding $5 million, which is what the lawsuit claims is the “aggregate amount in controversy.”

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PicThx Joy Reactor

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Hit-Or-Miss

Eating Raw Cookie Dough Won’t Make You Sick (Probably)

Cookie dough taste

Our lives have been a lie. From brownie batters to chocolate chip cookie dough we’ve been subjected to a wagging finger followed by a “don’t eat that you’ll get sick!” Well, it turns out that good ol’ Mom might have been keeping us away from this sweet stuff for no reason at all since it’s actually really hard to get salmonella from eggs.

We all know that the best part of making cookies is sneaking a taste of that sweet raw cookie dough and no one knows that better than Slate assistant editor L.V. Anderson. At the age of 27 she’s roughly consumed 360 raw eggs in her 15 years of baking and has never gotten sick. Anderson looked into the research behind salmonella and found that salmonella in eggs is rare to begin with.

Back in the 1980’s a salmonella outbreak in the US got hundreds of Americans sick and killed a few dozen. Because this was an egg-associated outbreak measures were put in place to ensure hens avoided infection. Just because a hen has salmonella doesn’t mean she’ll lay infected eggs though. Since new protocols were put in place it’s estimated that 0.012 percent of eggs would be contaminated with salmonella and even THAT doesn’t mean that you’ll get sick.

As long as you keep your eggs at or below 45 degrees your eggs will be safe. At these temperatures the salmonella bacteria can’t grow. It’s when you leave eggs out on the counter or at unsafe temperatures that you should start worrying. Even if you did ingest a little salmonella the chances that you’ll get sick are still relatively low, Anderson explains that salmonella doesn’t “do so well in a healthy human intestinal tract, where they have to compete with thousands of other bacteria for nutrients.”

Basically as long as your not eating tubs of raw cookie dough on the daily you’ll be fine. But in case you’re still worried you could always just cook the dough…

H/T + PicThx Slate, Photobucket