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Hit-Or-Miss

9 Everyday Foods That Could Kill Your Cat

Owning a pet of any kind brings joy, companionship and most of all — responsibility. So, even if you’re experienced with animals, it’s your job to make sure your felines are healthy and happy. One of the easiest ways to monitor your pet’s well-being is closely monitoring a diet that’s toxin-free in order to keep your furry roommate’s tummy out of harm’s way.

If you’re one of the 85.8 million people that own a cat, then you know it’s not often you have to watch everything that goes into it’s mouth, since cats are generally very fussy eaters. While our claw-equipped fur pillows might express some curiosity every time you make a tuna sandwich — that doesn’t mean you should feel inclined to make two.

With that said, here’s a few of the most common human foods that could actually be fatal to felines. So, take note to ensure that culinary curiosity doesn’t kill your cat.

1. Tuna & Poke

What can it do?

Although poke maybe be delicious, it’s not the best treat for your cat.

Actually, in excess tuna — and other fish—  in general is considered to be borderline unhealthy for cats because tuna doesn’t contain the nutrients cats need for a healthy digestive system.

Too much tuna for cats can lead to malnutrition. Additionally, poke is usually made with freshly squeezed lemon or citrus juice, which can cause vomiting, stomach irritation, and other digestive issues for our feline companions.

2. Fish & Poultry With Bones

What can it do?

Be careful if you feed your cats chicken or fish that might contain bones, as cats can easily choke on them. Fish bones are somewhat flexible, and can easily be consumed by a hungry kitty.

But let’s err on the side of caution here.

3. Alcohol

What can it do?

One teaspoon of alcohol can put a five pound cat into a coma, according to the ASPCA. Cat livers don’t operate as efficiently as the human liver  — which means wine, beer or spirits can cause serious health problems.

So, even if you and your cat are relaxing after a hard day at work, and you feel inclined to pour a little of alcohol into his or her bowl —  don’t.

However, if you feel like your cat just needs to, “wine” about their day of sleeping and watching birds, this cat wine will provide a healthy alternative.

 

4. Caffeine

@tania_crystal0126 (instagram)

What can it do?

Even small amounts of caffeine can cause rapid breathing, heart palpitations, and muscle tremors in cats.

Caffeine can be found in an array of products — even decaf coffee, teas, and other beverages — without consumer knowledge.

Since caffeine isn’t a nutrient, the Food and Drug Administration doesn’t require food manufacturers to list caffeine as food nutrition labels.

5. Chocolate

What can it do?

While dogs are more likely to get into a stash of indulgent chocolate before a cat does, it’s still a good idea to keep it out of kitty’s reach.

Theobromine is an alkaloid found in chocolate, which can cause everything from vomiting and diarrhea.

It’s estimated that more than 200 mg of theobromine can also cause cardiac failure.

 

6. Grapes & Raisins

@bordeauxwinelovers (instagram)

What can it do?

While grapes and raisins might seem like harmless treats for your cat, it’s a silent killer.

However, it’s unknown exactly what compound in grapes and raisins that make the fruit toxic to cats. If ingested, grapes have been known to cause kidney failure in them.

7. Candy, Gum, Toothpaste, or anything with Xylitol

What can it do?

Every diet soda you drink contains Xylitol, which is a sugar alcohol used as a sweetener in a lot of common foods. However, it will be anything but sweet to your inquisitive cat.

Xylitol can increase in the insulin circulating through your cat’s body, which will cause the cat’s blood sugar to drop, and can also lead to liver failure.

8. Baking Dough

What can it do?

Imagine your cat’s tummy as a tiny oven — if it eats uncooked dough, it will begin to expand inside.

This will obviously result in some discomfort to your four-legged friend, so be sure to keep baking dough out of kitty’s claws and jaws.

9. Raw Meat

What can it do?

Raw meat is never safe to eat due to the harmful bacteria, like salmonella, E. Coli and even listeria — which can cause an array of health issues for humans and their pets.

Always make sure your meat is covered and out of reach, you never know when kitty will hop up on the kitchen counter to investigate.

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Features

12 Human Foods You Didn’t Know Could Kill Your Dog

Chocolate Heading

The most important thing with pet care is knowing what you can and can’t feed your dog. That and capitalizing on your puppy for hilarious memes. As long as you stick to a pretty decent doggy diet, everything should be gravy right? Wrong. Turns out there’s a ton of foods you probably didn’t know about that can actually be really bad for your dog, including some that are perfectly healthy for humans.

After all, there’s nothing worse than having your dog suffer over a simple mistake in diet. While they’re still man’s best friend, they probably shouldn’t eat like your best friend. Because we at Foodbeast care about you and your canine companions, here are 12 human foods that your dog should most definitely avoid.

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Chocolate

Chocolate

Chocolate is one of the most common foods that is bad for dogs, so we figured we’d knock it off the list early. Dog owners know better than to leave a Toblerone or two laying around.

What’s In It:

Chocolate contains caffeine and theobromine which fall under the methylxanthines category. When we hear the phrase “the darker the chocolate, the more dangerous,” it’s because white chocolates contain fewer methylxanthines. Thus, less toxicity.

What It Can Do:

If eaten by a dog, chocolate can cause vomiting, dehydration, abdominal pains, severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, elevated body temperature, seizures and death.

H/T ASPCA

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Milk

cereal-tea-milk

Yeah we know, puppies drink milk from their mothers after they’re born. However, like humans  (including moi), dogs can also suffer from lactose intolerance.

What’s In It:

Milk contains milk sugar that dogs don’t have the enzymes to break down.

What It Can Do:

Consumption of milk could lead to vomiting, diarrhea and other gastrointestinal problems. While it’s not immediately life-threatening, it can contribute to serious bacterial exposure in dogs that could eventually lead to disease.

H/T Can I Give My Dog

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Cheese

Nachos

Sorry boy, no Grilled Cheese Spot for you. Your stomach will thank me for it later.

What’s In It:

Like milk, cheese also has sugars and fatty components that dogs don’t have the necessary enzymes to break down.

What It Can Do:

Cheese, and other dairy products, can cause problems if consumed in excess. Symptoms like gas, diarrhea and vomiting can all occur if a dog eats too much cheese.

H/T Dog Food Advisor

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Onion

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While onions go with pretty much anything savory, they can do more than just make your dog cry.

What’s In It:

Onions contain compounds that can be harmful to dogs if ingested enough.

What It Can Do:

Onions can damage red blood cells in dogs causing them to become weaker and move around less. If enough onions are consumed, a blood transfusion might be necessary.

H/T No Longer Wild

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Macadamia Nuts

Macadamias

One of the more recent discoveries, Macadamia Nuts can be incredibly harmful to dogs if eaten.

What’s In It:

The specific chemicals found in macadamias are still unknown right now, but they are known to cause a toxic reaction to dogs if ingested.

What It Can Do:

Dogs will develop weakness and an inability to walk, specifically in their hind legs. Vomiting, staggering gait, depression, tremors and hypothermia.

H/T VetMedicine

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Garlic

Garlic

Consider your dogs vampires and keep them away from raw garlic as much as possible.

What’s In It:

Like the chocolate rule, the stronger the onion the more toxic it can be. Since garlic is part of the onion family it’s even more dangerous to dogs than onions per ounce. Garlic contains compounds that are strong in toxicity.

What It Can Do:

While the effect of garlic consumption to red blood cells won’t appear for a few days in dogs, they’ll be tired and reluctant to move. The dog’s urine will be orange to dark red in color. Like with onions, a blood transfusion might be required in severe cases.

H/T ASPCA

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Grapes

Grapes

Like Macadamia Nuts, grapes and raisins can be extremely toxic to dogs.

What’s In It:

While its currently unknown what chemicals and compounds are in grapes that cause toxicity to dogs, the results of consumption can be pretty devastating.

What It Can Do:

Grapes and raisins can cause rapid kidney failure. While it varies between dogs, symptoms may not show up in them. Other than kidney failure, dogs can also develop vomiting or diarrhea as well as a lethargic state. Dogs will also develop dehydration and lack of appetite. Death from kidney failure may occur within three to four days.

H/T ASPCA

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Avocados

Slices of Avocado

You might want to hold off sharing that guac with your doggy pal. He’ll thank you for it later.

What’s In It:

Avocado leaves, pits, bark and fruit contain a toxin called persin.

What It Can Do:

Avocados can have toxic effects on dogs depending on the variety. They can cause upset stomachs in dogs, breathing difficulties, fluid buildup in the chest, but the most dangerous thing for them seem to the be the pit. Since it’s slippery, the pit can accidentally be swallowed by dogs, leading to obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract.

H/T HubPages

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Apple Cores

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While most people try to avoid eating the core of an apple, it’s actually much more toxic to dogs. Along with a few other fruits, you should definitely be careful not to leave apple cores laying around for dogs to get their paws on.

What’s In It:

The core of an apple (as well as plums, peaches, pears and apricots) contain cyanogenic glycosides which is also known as cyanide.

What It Can Do:

Some of the symptoms that come from ingesting the toxin are dizziness, struggling to breath, seizures, collapsing, hyperventilation, shock and even coma.

H/T HubPages

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Yeast Dough

Bread

Bread makes you fat? While having a chubby puppy isn’t the worst thing in the world, yeast dough used to make bread should absolutely be kept away from dogs.

What’s In It:

The raw yeast dough from making bread can ferment in a dog’s stomach, becoming toxic.

What It Can Do:

Aside from the toxicity from alcohol being produced in the stomach, yeast dough can also expand in your dog’s stomach or intestines and create a large amount of gas in the digestive system. This can lead to severe pain and a potentially ruptured stomach or intestinal tract. Vomiting, abdominal discomfort and lethargy can also occur.

H/T VetMedicine

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Caffeine

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No idea who would ever share coffee with a dog. I mean, what do they have to do all day other than sleep and look out the window?  In all seriousness, owners should never let their dogs near coffee or any form of caffeine.

What’s In It:

Coffee contains a stimulant known as Methylated xanthine.

What It Can Do:

Methylated xanthine stimulates the nervous system in dogs, causing vomiting, restlessness, heart palpitations and even death.

H/T Can I Give My Dog

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Bacon

bacon

What? Bacon?! Say it isn’t so! It’s absolutely tragic that we can’t share one of the greatest foods out there with our canine buddies. We’ll need to remember this the next time we want to feed our dogs some breakfast bacon under the table. Well, more bacon for us then. Sorry, buddy.

What’s In It:

Foods rich in fat, like bacon, can lead to the disease pancreatitis in dogs. Once a dog has developed pancreatitis, their pancreas’ become inflamed and stop functioning correctly.

What It Can Do:

This leads to all sorts of problems with digestion and nutrient absorption.

H/T Can I Give My Dog

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It should also be noted that the amount of damage these foods can do vary on the specific breeds and sizes of your dogs. Like humans, all dogs are different and can react differently to foods. Though it’s better to keep them away from these foods just for good measure.

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#foodbeast

How Raisins Are Made

A Good Read_500

PicThx Cuddles and Rage

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Features

Banana Runts, Raisins in Trail Mix and More ‘Rejectable’ Snacks You Love to Hate

rejectleader

Like white crayons, there are just some foods you love to hate. From black licorice jelly beans to raisins in trail mix – these are the foods you look at and can’t help but wonder why they’re here and what they want from us. And the worst part is you just can’t escape them, since snack manufacturers seem hell-bent on making us waste an extra two minutes just picking them out from the Chex and almonds and Apple Runts they know we love.

Our friends at Thrillist dubbed these foods the “Rejectables.” And these are the ones we’ve come to lovehate most:

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Raisin in Trail Mix

reject1

To be fair, trail mix kind of sucks to begin with. There’s always too much processed honey/sugar flavor and not enough M&Ms. But add in all those extra raisins and you can’t help but pucker.  And then there’s all the syrup that oozes out and gets over everything. Raisins, do us a favor and keep your yuck to yourselves.

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Peanut Taffy

reject2

I’m not sure who makes these and why they keep doing it when no one seems to like them. But for some reason, at least one house on the block continues to hand them out every Halloween, leading to more than few dollars wasted every time kids inevitably throw them out.

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Black Licorice Jelly Beans

reject3

This goes for black licorice in general, but at least those straws keep to themselves. These guys have absolutely no business crowding up my Jelly Bellys.

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Banana Runts

reject4

Banana flavored things are just weird as a collective, maybe because they’re too sweet. From now on, let’s assume all fruit-flavored candies need to be a little sour, k? (Green Apple my darling, I’m totally looking at you.)

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The “Regular Option” in a Variety Pack

reject5

Thrillist used regular Sam Adams Boston Lager as their example, but I’d like to extend the category to all regular options in Variety Packs. From fruit snacks to condoms, the only reason I’m buying this stupid variety pack in the first place is because buying a whole set of the one I actually want is too expensive. If I wanted the normal version, I’d buy the normal version, so GTFO of my variety pack.

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Check out the rest of the list of top “Rejectable” foods over at Thrillist.

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Health

New Study Suggests Snacking on Raisins Helps More Efficiently Curb Hunger

A new research study funded by the California Raisin Marketing Board (yes, that exists), suggests that eating raisins as an after-school snack prevents excessive calorie intake and increases the feeling fullness, as compared to other commonly consumed snacks.

Conducted by G. Harvey Anderson, Ph.D., Professor of Nutritional Sciences and Physiology out of the University of Toronto, along with a small team of equally accredited faculty, the team had the following to say in regards to their research:

We found consumption of raisins as a snack prevented excessive calorie intake, increased the feeling of fullness, and thereby may help contribute to the maintenance of a healthy weight in school-age children.

The study was conducted among 26 normal-weight boys and girls ages 8 – 11 during a three-month period. Study participants were randomly assigned the task of eating raisins or other snacks, which included grapes, potato chips, or chocolate chip cookies until they were “comfortably full.”

Here are some of the key findings from the study:

  • Food intake following raisin consumption was lower and satiation greater compared to the
    other snacks
  • When eating raisins, children consumed significantly fewer calories when compared to the other snacks in the study
    • Grapes, potato chips and cookies resulted in ~ 56 percent, 70 percent and 108 percent higher calorie intake compared to raisins, respectively
  • Cumulative calorie intake (breakfast + morning snack + lunch + after-school snack) was
    10 percent – 19 percent lower after raisins compared to other snacks
  • Although all snacks reduced subjective appetite, desire-to-eat was lowest after consuming raisins

Considering the people funding the research — you’ll have to accept the findings knowing the California Raisin Marketing Board has an obvious obligation to get you to eat more raisins, but that doesn’t discredit the research efforts put forth by the small team of professors.

Conclusions? Eating raisins has more of a chance of making you full — apparently — than grapes, potato chips, or chocolate chip cookies. Subsequently, the amount of calories consumed following raisin ingestion was lower compared to other snacks.

Anyone  eat raisins, or have suggestions on healthy alternative snack foods to curb hunger? Speak on it!

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Cravings

Teddy Bear Toast

This is probably the cutest thing I’ve seen all week. A teddy bear made from nothing more than toast and a few other household ingredients. It makes me almost not want to eat it. Almost. Parent’s looking to get creative with their kids’ meals, or guys who just want to cheer up their girls, should definitely give this recipe a try. The full details are posted by KidsSoup, but all you mostly need is bread, raisins, banana, and butter.

And to all you Foodbeasts out there, get creative with this and see what you can come up with!

via: Mini-Eco

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Adventures Cravings Sweets

Adventure: McDonald’s Fruit & Maple Oatmeal

If you guys haven’t been paying attention recently, McDonald’s just dropped a healthy alternative for breakfast foods and all day snacks in form of their Fruit & Maple Oatmeal! I’ve always been a connoisseur of fine oatmeal, so of course I had to try McDonald’s new take on an old favorite. Was their oatmeal too runny? Too thick? Check it out right here after I opened this baby up.

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News

McDonald’s Fruit & Maple Oatmeal is Launched Nationwide

For those that complain about a wealth of cheap, unhealthy breakfast food options at your local McDonald’s, get ready to be presented with a healthy alternative: Fruit & Maple Oatmeal. This latest addition to their breakfast arsenal showcases a profile of less than 300 calories, 32 grams of 100% whole grains, has about a half-cup of fruit (fresh apples, two types of raisins and dried cranberries) and comes complete with cream and brown sugar. While we mentioned this product boosting their breakfast offerings, it is actually available all day and is currently being offered in more than 13,000 of their locations nationwide.