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Alcohol Drinks Restaurants

This Vermont Bar Makes Rare Booze Available For All

Prohibition Pig might want to think about changing its name to Proletariat Pig because of its new Liquor Society menu. It offers flights in various liquor categories from around the world. 

With thirty flights available on the menu, customers are encouraged to keep a log and notes of their experiences. Each threesome highlights producers, styles, climates and production and aging strategies. Thanks to an approachable price and format, members can choose a flight featuring local favorites such as Caledonia Spirits’ Barr Hill Gin or Shelburne Orchard Dead Bird Brandy. Some might seek the chance to try a prestigious Fire and Ice Edition Single Malt Scotch Whisky from Highland Park or a rare El Jolgorio mezcal showcasing different species of agave plants.

“Something you know, something you don’t, and something you’ll never see again,” said Jackson Strayer-Benton, Prohibition Pig’s Beverage Director, certified sommelier and Executive Bourbon Steward from Stave and Thief Society, of the offering. “You won’t find a menu like this anywhere in the Northeast. There are only a handful of tasting selections this exclusive in the U.S.” 

Ten flights qualify members as a “Sea Bird,” named for the boat that would transport illegal booze from the “Rum Row” ships during Prohibition. “Malahat” members boast 20 different flights, named for a large ship that transported liquor from British Columbia to the West Coast of the United States. Completing the program with 30 different flights, “Tomoka” is named for William McCoy’s rum-running ship made famous for only carrying pure product, not watered down or polluted, as well as an intimidating machine gun installed on the top deck. These customers are rewarded with a private tasting for four and a complimentary dinner.

“Jackson is preparing the Prohibition Pig team to speak knowledgeably and with first-hand experience about each flight, conducting weekly tastings and on-site trips to local distilleries to understand the process, culture, and history of each liquor,” said Eric Warnsted, Prohibition Pig Chef and Owner.

“Eric changed the nature of restaurants. He understands that it’s all about relationships, whether that is with farmers, distillers, brewers, and especially staff and customers,” Strayer-Benton adds. “Together we looked at Prohibition Pig’s impressive wall of liquor and knew that this was another chance to create a destination experience and sense of belonging.”

Head to Waterbury, Vermont to check out Prohibition Pig’s new Liquor Society menu for yourself.