Categories
Restaurants

One of Argentina’s Top Chefs Shows Amazing Ways to Cook With Shishito Peppers

Holy Shishito!

The shishito — a mild, distinctly delicious pepper originally from Japan — has made its appearance in all sorts of cuisines over the years, most notably in East Asian cooking. But one of its most recent debuts was in the Royal Hawaiian Fire Grill’s Laguna Beach kitchen.

One dish in particular, the wood-grilled hanger steak with okra, charred tomatoes and watermelon radish, mixes tropical tastes with the unexpected mild heat of this ingredient. It’s the creation of renowned Chef Martin Molteni, who ranks among Argentina’s top chefs. He joined his brother and fellow chef, Mariano “Maro” Molteni, who formerly owned Argentina-inspired steakhouse Maro Wood Grill, in the rebirth of the Royal Hawaiian.  The brothers took over ownership and operations in January, and since then, the restaurant has undergone a face-lift, an overhaul of the food and drink menu, and a rebranding. The restaurant reopened as Royal Hawaiian Fire Grill in April, and together Martin and Maro are continuing the landmark restaurant’s aloha spirit with an homage to Polynesian-inspired dishes, drinks and flavors.

“[The hanger steak] not only reflects the beautiful California summer season, but it also spotlights our real love for open wood-grill cooking, which is a cultural highlight in both Argentina, where my brother Maro and I were raised, and Polynesian culinary heritages,” says Martin. “I chose hanger steak as the protein, as it has a great deal of character and presence. When you choose hanger steak, however, every subsequent product you choose for the plate must have a strong edge in flavor, too. The shishito pepper is a perfect choice because it gives acidity, fruitiness and a soft piquant that helps to express the meat’s lovely flavor.”

Bright, slightly sweet and a little bit smoky, the shishito makes an excellent addition to dishes that require a pepper without adding too much heat. Frieda’s Specialty Produce’s Alex Berkley describes the taste of the shishito pepper as a cross between a jalapeño and a bell pepper. “They have the great taste of peppers without being overly hot,” she notes. “So I can actually taste the pepper and incorporate them with other ingredients, without them overwhelming the recipe.”

Although shishito peppers were originally from Japan, Berkley says they’re now most often sourced from Mexico. Bright green and bumpy, they’re usually about finger-length and, like many peppers, they’re naturally high in vitamin C. The seeds of the shishito are edible, and those who are more sensitive to spice need not worry much — only one in 10 shishitos reach a medium level of heat.

Often found in East Asian cuisine, the shishito offers an interesting array of flavors depending on how it’s prepared. When left raw, the crisp, thin walls of the shishito are reminiscent of a bell pepper, although it becomes much more complex when cooked. Since the shishito is quite thin-skinned, it chars and blisters easily. When paired with simple ingredients such as soy sauce or sesame oil, the distinct smokiness of the pepper shines through.“Grilled or roasted is the most common way to prepare them,” Berkley says.

And when it came to preparing their wood-grilled hanger steak, Maro and Martin wanted to go with an ingredient that would lend a light and fresh profile, while still offering a depth of flavor and strong character. “It’s a perfect summery plate that expresses all the bright and fresh produce of the season,” notes Martin.

“In all the time I’ve spent in my kitchens and in cooking around the world, I’ve learned that we never have to abuse a dish by overloading it with a specific product. It’s very important to have balance as well as a sharp, appetizing flavor here — a piquancy — and few peppers deliver better than the shishito.”

Related Links:

Tales from the Kitchen: A Love of Gastronomy With Michelin Stars

10 Grilling Mistakes You Should Never Make

7 Atypical Gadgets From Uncommon Goods We Love


Article by Jordan Nishkian for Sauté Magazine. Photography by Max Milla. Read the original article here.

Categories
Cravings Video

The Spiciest Curry On Earth Must Be Prepared With Gas Masks [WATCH]

A good, spicy curry should be able to make your forehead glisten like the wet rocks along a coast as the morning sun gently touches their surfaces. S0 imagine how drenched you’ll get when your lips touch the fiery overtures of the world’s spiciest bowl of curry.

YouTuber Strictly Dumpling visits Brick Lane Curry, home of what’s said to be the world’s spiciest curry.

Made with Carolina Reaper peppers, chefs have to actually throw on a GAS MASK in order to prepare the dish. Originally, the dish was prepared with habanero peppers, but has gotten a reboot over the years with the reapers.

Like most food challenges, the consumer has to sign a waiver giving consent to any health problems that may occur from such a devilish dish.

We’re sweating just watching him attempt this feat.

Brick Curry has two locations, one in New York and one in New Jersey. You can find the Carolina Reaper Curry at the Jersey location.

Obviously, try it at your own risk.

Categories
Health

This Colorful Infographic Shows Us The Health Benefits Of Eating A Rainbow

Rainbow-Foods-Cover

Does your daily diet consist of rainbows? No, not the meteorological phenomenon cause by reflection and refraction of light. Rather, do you eat enough of colorful fruits and vegetables to nourish your body?

Swissotel released a new infographic that highlights the health benefits of the colors in the foods you consume. Red foods, like tomatoes and strawberries, improve skin quality. Blue foods, like blueberries and plums, help boost memory and protects cells.

Check out the infographic below and get a little more color in your diet. You’ll thank us in the long run.

Browse our illustrative guide to each food colour and discover the health benefits for including them in your daily diet.

Categories
Health Hit-Or-Miss News

Science Says Eating Chili Peppers Could Be The Key To A Longer Life

Claims that spicy foods provide health benefits have circulated for centuries. Now, scientists might be able to explain why.

In 2014, the National Center For Biotechnology Information claimed that cardamom, a spice used to make chai tea, was “linked to anti-tumor activity,” according to The Washington Post. That’s just one spice in a list of several that have been suggested to have medicinal properties.

Now, thanks to a study completed by the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont, analyzed lifestyle data and mortality rates from more than 16,000 adults concluded that a compound in peppers has the ability to prevent factors that lead to heart disease and stroke.

In order to conduct this study, the authors used the Center for Disease Control’s National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey between 1988 to 1994, as the sample size in which to prove that the consumption of chili peppers — specifically capsaicin, the active component within them — can actually help you live longer. 

The illustration above shows a very simple depiction of where peppers contain capsaicin. It was found under the “capsaicin” hashtag on Instagram.

In short, the study found that people who regularly consumed capsaicin “had a 13 percent lower hazard of death compared to those who did not.”

Additionally, the study went on to claim that capsaicin actually acted like “an anti-obesity mechanism due to the interaction with the body’s transient receptor potential channels.” Transient receptor potential channels are different types of receptors that help regulate sensations like temperature and pressure.

Here’s an excerpt of the findings, pulled from the Discussion section of the study:

Activation of TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) appears to stimulate cellular mechanisms against obesity, by altering mediators of lipid catabolism and thermogenesis [27]. Protection against obesity leads to decreased risk of cardiovascular, metabolic and lung diseases.” — The Association of Hot Red Chili Pepper Consumption and Mortality: A Large Population-Based Cohort Study

Adding to the benefits of capsaicin, chili peppers also contain A, C, and B vitamins, all of which are essential to healthy diets.

What’s most important about these findings is that the study correlates positive reinforcement to already existing scientific studies that hypothesize that there are multiple health benefits to including spicy foods in a healthy diet.

The peer-reviewed study emphasizes that while there is no concrete evidence that eating peppers will lead to immortality — nor hold the keys to the fountain of youth — more research on this topic will only bring forth new concepts and knowledge that might benefit mankind.

“Such evidence may lead to new insights into the relationships between diet and health, updated dietary recommendations, and the development of new therapies.” 

So now, in the days where spicy challenges seem to be a popular trend, no matter how masochistic the act of eating hot chili peppers may seem, it’s safe to say there’s nothing like the sensation of a fiery mouth and a scorching, swollen set of lips that will look for anything to ease the pain.

Still, we insist on going back for more, and according to science, that’s a good thing.

Categories
Packaged Food

INTRODUCING: Trader Joe’s New Hatch Chile MAC & CHEESE

TJ-Mac-Hatch

Spicy mac and cheese is definitely one of life’s little pleasures. So we where delighted to hear Trader Joe’s announce a new frozen mac and cheese that features the ever-awesome hatch chili.

The New Mexico native chili pepper boasts a sweet, spicy and earthy flavor that comes from roasting it. Trader Joe’s new macaroni features semolina elbow macaroni in a creamy cheese sauce that’s made with a combination of Cheddar, milk and butter.

The chile itself is roasted, chopped and mixed into the mac so that the heat is evenly distributed.

A 12-ounce box that serves two will cost you $2.99. One might not be enough for us.

Just saying.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Twins Juiced 130 Of The World’s Hottest Peppers And Drank It, Watch What Happens

Twin-Peppers

Currently the Carolina Reaper is classified as the hottest pepper in the world, the previous pepper to hold that title was the Trinidad moruga scorpion. It’s safe to say that both peppers are pretty hot boasting Scoville levels ranging from 1.5 million to 2.2 million.

So if you had 65 Trinidad Morugas and 65 Carolina Reapers, eating it probably wouldn’t be the best idea. So these two twin brothers juiced them.

Combining both sets of peppers in a juicer, these guys liquified 130 of the hottest peppers in the world and set them into shot glasses.

Watch what happens. We also can’t stress enough not to try this at home.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

FDA Recalls 6,215 Pounds of Serrano Chile Peppers, We See You Salmonella

Serrano-Chili-Recalls

We have yet another Salmonella scare, folks. This time the infection has reached about 6,215 pounds of serrano chile peppers. A random health test discovered that signs of the pathogen appeared in a batch of peppers distributed in Meijer stores in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Kentucky.

These batches may also be found at other grocery retailers like Walmart, Publix and Harris Teeter.

People with Salmonella poisoning may experience symptoms like fever, diarrhea, nausea, bloody diarrhea, vomiting and abdominal pain. The illness affects children and the elderly more drastically because of their weaker immune systems and may result in hospitalization or death.

The Food and Drug Administration urges consumers to check with retailers from whom they’ve bought serrano chiles between Oct. 2 through Oct. 22 in the affected areas. So far, it’s confirmed that Meijer had a batch of contaminated peppers with the possibility of others stores as well.

More information about the recall can be found through the FDA.

H/T Consumerist

 

Categories
Products

Ghost Pepper, Habanero, and Jalapeno Gummy Peppers Will Burn So Sweet

Spicy-Gummy-Peppers-Cover

New to the world of novelty candies are Spicy Gummy Peppers, the snack that’s supposedly almost as spicy as the real peppers they’re based on. The three peppers come in different shapes: Jalapeño, Habanero and Ghost Pepper. Each pepper represents a different level of heat intensity.

The gummies are combined with a fruit flavor to pair with the heat: jalapeño and apple, habanero and orange, and cherry and ghost pepper. Each gummy is actually imbued with the real-life pepper, albeit not as intense. It still needs to taste like candy, after all.

A 3-pack of Gummy Peppers, one of each gummy, is available at vat19 for $10. As the site recommends, might be best to keep a milk bucket nearby.

H/T Neatorama