Categories
Fast Food Restaurants

Panda Express Is Testing Out Pastrami Bao Buns At Their Innovation Kitchen

It seems Panda Express has been tinkering more and more with fusing flavors of Eastern dishes with Western comfort foods as of late. A few months back, the chain introduced a new protein that combined the traditional flavors of Sichuan peppercorns with the Southern heat of Nashville Hot Chicken.

In what appears to be a delicious trend, Panda Express has announced another new flavor combination that’s hitting their Innovation Kitchen in Pasadena, CA. Feast your eyes on the Pastrami Bao Buns.

The new item combines the popular Taiwanese street food of Pork Belly Bao Buns with the classic American deli staple the Pastrami Sandwich. Pork Belly is slow cooked, Hickory liquid smoked, blended with pastrami spices, and topped with pickled cucumbers before going inside an airy bao bun. Finally, the dish is slathered with a sweet and savory sauce to bring it all together.

Be still my pastrami-loving belly.

You can find this item only at the Panda Express Innovation Kitchen in Pasadena, CA. If popular enough, we can expect to see the Pastrami Bao Buns arrive at restaurants on a national scale. Until then, I’ll need to find some time on my calendar to drive out and try the new dish.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Iconic Katz’s Deli Making Its Way To Los Angeles

Quotes in this article have been transcribed from the Foodbeast Katchup podcast, now on Spotify and the Apple Podcasts App.

West coasters usually have to travel east to get a bite of Katz’s Deli’s famed pastrami sandwiches in New York, but Angelenos should mark their calendars, as there are going to be at least a couple opportunities to get their hands on the legendary pastrami in the near future.

One of those opps was accidentally revealed by The Hundreds co-founder Ben Shenassafar, who blurted out the surprise  during his appearance on the Foodbeast Katchup Podcast.

Shenassafar, AKA Ben Hundreds was explaining how his September 15, Family Style Food Festival came together, and while rattling of names of people he was bringing on, he accidentally mentioned the name of Katz’s owner Jake Dell.

“We were just like, ‘Let’s just call a couple friends’… I called Jake Dell from… Whoops,” Shenassafar said. “No one knows that news yet. If you know who Jake Dell is, you know who Jake Dell is.”

The Hundreds have some of the heaviest hitters in LA restaurant scene joining them, such as Howlin’ Rays, and Jon & Vinny’s, but having a New York staple in Katz’s adds a whole new wrinkle to the food exclusivity they’re promising at their event.

Before the festival, however, LA can get its hands on the classic pastrami from now until August 25, as Katz has reportedly teamed with Belcampo Meat Co. to deliver pastrami sandwich kits through Uber Eats, according to TimeoutLA.

The build-your-own kits come with a serving of the world-famous pastrami, rye bread, Katz’s famous mustard, and a Belcampo burger just for kicks.

If you’re within the delivery range of Belcampo’s four LA locations, you can have Katz’s delivered to your home through Uber Eats for about $27.

Unfortunately, it is only available through the app and not at any of the Belcampo locations.

If you can’t exactly fly out to New York anytime soon, Katz’s is having a limited west coast experience. If you miss out on the Uber Eats opportunuty, you can at least try to get tickets to The Hundreds’ Family Style festival.

Categories
Restaurants

This Restaurant Is Elevating Brunch By Using House Made Pastrami

Photo: Saute Magazine

Chef Nick Oberlin has just debuted his new weekend brunch menu at Pour Company, (one of Orange County’s best-kept secrets) located in the heart of downtown Fullerton. Outfitted with an all-weather patio, the ambiance of Pour Company is the perfect destination to enjoy revamped brunch classics with morning Eye Openers … mimosas anyone?

Pour Company is celebrating the simplicity of al fresco dining while serving bold, energized interpretations of familiar American menu items, guaranteed to satisfy both sweet and savory taste buds. Oberlin’s approach includes sauces made from scratch, like the mustard Hollandaise on his prosciutto Benedict and made-in-house pastrami for the sweet potato hash. His thoughtfulness in execution is presented through locally sourced ingredients with each and every bite. The menu items are straight-forward and appealing; there’s no confusion as to what’s being offered, nothing is hard to pronounce or unfamiliar. You could easily bring a group here and everyone would be pleased.

All of Chef’s breakfast favorites are among the menu, including avocado toast, breakfast burritos (vegetarian-friendly option) and stuffed cinnamon French toast. To make it a balanced brunch menu, Chef has sprinkled in lunch favorites as well, featuring bacon mac & cheese, Poutine and a house burger.

Personally, I encourage you to start with the chicken & waffles, then order the 3-Star pancakes (banana option) while sipping on a warm cup of coffee. You’ll experience the epitome of brunch: savory, sweet and undeniable satisfaction.

Brunch wouldn’t be complete without a toast-worthy cocktail. The Eye Openers include bottomless mimosas (2-hour limit), brunch bloody, micheladas and sangria.

The weekend brunch menu is offered Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekly.

Related Links:

24 Carrots: An Unforgettable Chef’s Table With Chef Nick Weber

Ways & Means Oyster House Is The Raw Deal 

One World Everybody Eats Receives Humanitarian Of The Year Award


Article by Kara Ihrig for Sauté Magazine. Read the original article here

Categories
Adventures Cravings Culture Restaurants

14 Underrated Charcuterie Cuts To Track Down And Add To Your Boards

If you haven’t heard of charcuterie by now, it’s probably already at your local gastropub, ready for you to give it a try. The cured meat craze has swept across the country in recent years, to the point where most trendy establishments have at least one or two boards on their menus.

Whether you pair them with quality cheeses and wine or just eat the meats by themselves, it’s poppin’ to be popping a few slices into your mouth prior to the entree.

So far, the most common and ubiquitous charcuterie we’re seeing include salamis and prosciuttos, both of which are delicious in their own rights. There is, however, a whole host of other cooked and cured meats that can be featured on these platters, meats that even those with basic knowledge of charcuterie have yet to witness.

Whether you’re building your own at the nearby butcher shop, or have the opportunity to select some unique cuts on the menu, these are a few different charcuterie you should track down. More than just edgy meats that nobody around you has tried, these cuts are treats as delectable as advertised, or in some cases, even more so.

Coppa di Testa

Not many butchers or meat shops make their own coppa di testa anymore, but those that do, make it a real treat. According to partner Steve Sabicer of Jonathan Gold-renowned Electric City Butcher, it is made by rolling up and cooking an entire deboned pig’s head sous vide-style in Italian spices. You can individually taste each part: the soft and fatty jowl, the gelatinous ear, the tender tongue, and even the snout. It is sliced paper-thin, but each sliver comes with a unique variety of tastes and textures.

Sremska

“Sremska” is actually just the Serbian name for sausage, and is not assigned to a particularly special cut. According to meat expert Claudiu Giorgioni from Orange County’s Goodies in the Pantry, the sausage is traditionally smoked and dried. Made with pork and beef, it is seasoned with salt, pepper, garlic, and paprika, which gives the meat a bright red hue.

Biltong

This is a jerky-like charcuterie you may want to get ready to start seeing everywhere. Industry experts have been naming biltong as one of the popular items to watch for this year as dried meat snacks grow in popularity. Hailing from Southern Africa, Biltong is cured then air-dried before being sliced paper thin. There’s a special machine used to get it to the right thickness, and it should melt in your mouth when you place a slice on your tongue.

Game Meat Pastrami

We all know beef as the meat of choice for pastrami, but that does not mean other animals can be cured and smoked in a similar fashion. At Goodies in the Pantry, for example, Giorgioni will make pastrami out of just about anything: Pork tenderloin, rabbit, goose, venison, and even antelope, which you can see pictured above.

Speck

Prosciutto speck shares a lot of similarities with its more famous cousin, prosciutto di parma. Both are salted, spiced and cured for a long period of time, and both come from pork legs. Unlike prosciutto di parma, however, speck goes through a smoking process, which imparts a different flavor and texture to the meat. It also predominantly comes from the top round of the pork hind leg, whereas prosciutto is usually a whole one.

Lomo

Widely popular in Spain, lomo is air-cured pork tenderloin. It can be done with or without the thick cap of fat you see in the one pictured above, which adds loads of flavor and creaminess to the meat. If you’re in Spain and looking for a cured meat feast, this is a tasty, budget-friendly alternative to jamon iberico, even if the lomo is made from Iberian pigs itself.

Sujuk

There’s several ways to spell this spicy beef sausage, including sudzuka, sujuk, sucuk, and others. Popular across the Middle East and Balkans regions, its cumin, garlic, and red pepper are the predominant flavors you’ll find no matter where you are tasting sujuk. It tends to be dried for several weeks before being sold, and is especially good on flatbreads like lahmajoun.

Culatello

Culatello is known by many as the “king of cured meats” because of its intense flavor and the process it goes through. A pork’s hind leg (the same used to make prosciutto) is deboned, netted, and cured for at least a year before being softened in wine for a couple of days. It is produced exclusively in the flatlands north of Parma, Italy.

Finocchiona

This looks like the salami we’re used to, but is much more regional and not as well known here in the United States, where Genovese salami is more common. Finocchiona is native to Tuscany, and gets its exclusive name and flavor from being cured with fennel seeds. Their aromatic fragrance adds a punch to the salami you will not get from other variants.

Virsli

Photo courtesy of Claudio Gonzalez

This is another generalistic term for “sausage” that can be applied to variants from Vienna, Romania, Hungary, and other places. Typically, this type of sausage is smoked and can then be served boiled or grilled. The spices vary by region, according to Giorgioni, who says that while Romanians typically use a lot more garlic, you may find a lot more hot paprika in Hungarian virsli.

Salumi Rosa

You’ll be hard-pressed to find this cut (pictured in the bottom part of the above platter) outside of Bologna, Italy. The city’s signature charcuterie is made in a style similar to mortadella, but only the pork shoulder meat is ground. Lard is “marbled” into the cut before it’s cooked, giving it the effect of an almost checkered sliver of meat. It’s best eaten thinly sliced with a good loaf of bread.

Eastern Prosciutto

Photo courtesy of Claudio Gonzalez

This specifically refers to prosciutto made in parts of Eastern Europe, since the process differs a little bit from Italy. Both are whole, salted pork hind legs, but in Eastern Europe the entire leg is also smoked, making it less salty than the Italian counterpart.

Liver Mousse

Liver mousse is technically charcuterie because the term refers to cold cooked meats. As such, pates like this can be commonly found in butcher and charcuterie shops all over the U.S. The key to cooking these is to seal the top with a layer of animal fat, almost like natural Tupperware. It is then baked in a water bath, bain-marie style, to keep the temperature even and prevent parts of the mousse from overcooking.

Categories
Restaurants

This Humble Deli Is Also A Living Sketchbook Featuring Artwork From Famous Cartoonists

Nestled amongst some of the film and entertainment industry’s most celebrated animation studios, lies a deli that exalts the illustrators who bring to life many of the beloved cartoon characters seen on televisions all across the planet.

Moore’s Delicatessen in Burbank, CA, offers a canvas for these artists to express themselves through their natural talents — by letting them draw directly on its walls.

The deli is run by Robert Moore, a former executive chef for Dodgers Stadium and the Staples Center. During his time as an executive chef, Moore found that working with huge customer volume and millions of dollars in sales burnt him out.

He wanted to start his own smaller, more intimate, enterprise.

“I always wanted my own deli, and I came across a picture of Moore’s Delicatessen that my grandparents owned back in 1946 in San Francisco,” he said. “Then this opportunity came along and now my dream had come true.”

That opportunity was a space in Burbank, and after scraping the money together, Moore opened his own Moore’s Delicatessen, inspired by his grandparents’ former business.

Walking into the dining area of Moore’s Deli, guests are immediately transported inside a magical sketchbook: The walls of the deli are garnished with drawings from animators who hail from neighboring studios, illustrating characters they’ve put on television or simply a creative doodle they want to share with the deli.

“Originally the walls were just white,” Moore explained. “We used to be open in the evenings, and the animators from Adventure Time would show up and they’d watch their new episodes air back in 2011.”

Moore recalled he would see the professionals doodle on napkins and had the idea to give them some Sharpies and let them draw on the walls. With those literal strokes of genius, Moore’s infamous cartoonist wall began gradually evolving into a living sketchbook over the course of the decade.

Even the late Stephen Hillenburg, creator of the prolific animated series SpongeBob Squarepants, would frequent Moore’s Deli about once a week.

“He loved the tempeh sandwich,” Moore recalled. “He always ate very healthy.” One of the wall’s earliest sketches was from Hillenburg himself, an illustration of Patrick Star.

Moore’s always open to artists and animators adding more to his wall, though he has just one condition before you put pen to plaster.

“You have to get a paycheck, probably,” he laughed, explaining that he would prefer the wall space be reserved for professional animators. Moore says that parents would come in and let their kids draw all over the walls in the earlier days, and he would have to paint over it in order to keep the professional aesthetic.

Today, artists are still frequenting the deli from nearby studios and Moore says that one of his favorite things about coming into work is finding additions to his wall. He welcomes all to visit and take in the creativity that flows through that dining room.

The pastrami reuben is pretty good, too.

Categories
Fast Food What's New

Togo’s New Pretzelrami Packs On The Pastrami And We’re Not Mad

There’s never such a thing as too much pastrami. I tell my friends this. I tell my colleagues this. I’ll probably tell my kids this. Knowing the amount of work that goes into brining and smoking the product makes me appreciate the flavorful meat all the more. Just pile anything with pastrami and I’m there.

In my quest to try anything and everything new in the world of pastrami sandwiches, I discovered Togo’s newest addition to their menu lineup. They also recently revamped themselves with a new slogan: True to the Sandwich. To coincide with the relaunch, the sandwich chain created a new signature item in this massive Pretzelrami. It features… you guessed it… tons of pastrami.

The sandwich boasts more than a quarter pound of Togo’s pastrami and is topped with two slices of white cheddar cheese, yellow mustard, dill pickles, and served inside a toasted soft pretzel roll.

Honestly, the best kind of pastrami sandwich is one where there’s so much pastrami falling off, you can throw it on your chips or fries afterwards.

Pastrami-loving patrons can find Togo’s new Pretzelrami permanently on the menu as a signature item. Just be ready for that subsequent food coma that’s sure to follow after crushing one. I know I sure am.

Categories
Restaurants

Popular Bakehouse Creates Pastrami-Stuffed Croissants

Mr. Holmes has been one of my favorite bakehouses for a while now. The pastries are always phenomenal and because their menu revolves more than the front door of a great metropolitan hotel, my interest is always piqued when it comes to the debut of new items.

So imagine my excitement when the immensely popular bakehouse just added a new stuffed croissant they’re simply calling: Just Try It.

The new croissants feature pastrami made from a rub created by Mr. Holmes’ neighbor Tinfoil Deli. You may remember them from our sandwich speakeasy video a few months back. The tender smoked meat is wrapped in a buttery croissant pastry and filled with pickled mandarins and red onions, Manchego cheese, and topped with pepitas, fennel seeds, and more Manchego.

Costa:

If all of these flavors have your mind in a pickle, trust me, the taste is incredible.

You can find the new Just Try It croissants at the Mr. Holmes bakehouses in Southern California and San Francisco.

Man, these were so good, I didn’t even need to throw mustard on it.

Categories
Celebrity Grub

Gordon Ramsay Hates These American Foods, And He’s Wrong AF

Gordon Ramsay is a legend in the food world, and his word is taken as gospel by many, so when Stephen Colbert asked Ramsay what American food he hates, the next words that came out of his mouth we’re going to be crucial.

Ramsay claimed on the Late Show that he’s not a fan of grits, which isn’t a big deal as it is a bit of an acquired taste, but then he went on to attack our American style sandwiches.

“You go to a deli, and the sandwich is like f*cking 12-feet tall,” Ramsay said, like that’s a bad thing. “You can’t eat it!”

Thankfully Colbert came to the defense of our beloved giant sandwiches, saying, “That’s the sandwich of a superpower, my friend. Back when you had an empire, your sandwiches were much larger.”

Yeah, you sometimes have squeeze the sandwich down a bit in order to get a good bite, but it is absolutely doable, and we’ve been doing it for years.

Then he had the nerve to diss deep-fried turkeys.

OK, he might have a point with the turkeys, making the argument against its dryness, but do it right so it’s not dry! Plus, this is ‘Murica, and absolutely everything must be deep fried. Colbert politely corrected him again, saying, “I’m from the south, everything is deep fried. We dip it in concrete, and then we deep fat fry it.”

If the great Gordon Ramsay really can’t handle a stacked pastrami sandwich from Katz’s Deli, or enjoy a nice deep fried turkey, I might have just lost a hero.