Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

One Of Your Favorite Cocktails Can Actually Cause Serious Skin Burns

If you’re planning on spending your spring break sipping cocktails in a sunny locale, you might want to stop what you’re doing and pay attention.

Drunk texting your ex and waking up with a next-level hangover aren’t the only things you have to worry about when knocking back a few drinks on the beach.

It turns out, spilling your beloved margaritas on your sun-kissed skin can actually result in some pretty nasty skin burns.

I know, I felt pretty betrayed by my boozy BFF when I found out about this, too.

If you’re not familiar with this phenomenon, it’s known as phytophotodermatitis or “Margarita Dermatitis,” and it’s caused by lime juice getting on your skin. It’s also way more common than you may think.

We turned to Monique Olivares, a leading PA-C from Schweiger Dermatology in NYC, to get the scoop on this skin condition.

Olivares told Elite Daily,

Phytophotodermatitis is a skin rash that occurs when a sun-sensitizing chemical on the skin reacts with sunlight. This chemical reaction can cause redness, burning, blisters and residual dark pigmentation at the site of exposure.

If you think about the typical beach party scene, full of sloppy partiers sloshing their drinks around as they live it up under the sun, it becomes pretty apparent why phytophotodermatitis should be of particular concern for spring breakers.

Check out the pictures below for a closer look at this skin reaction (I’m going to warn you, it’s not very pretty).

Drinking margaritas on the beach sounds pretty great…

 

A photo posted by @concealedkari on

…but did you know your beloved, boozy beverage can do more than just give you one hell of a hangover ?

 

A photo posted by Shosh (@princessmarysue) on

Yep, it turns out mixing citrus with sun produces a chemical reaction that can leave your skin with redness, burning, blisters and residual dark spots.  

This phenomenon is known as phytophotodermatitis…

 

A photo posted by Shosh (@princessmarysue) on

…and according to Monique Olivares, a PA-C from Schweiger Dermatology in NYC, it’s essentially a “skin rash that occurs when a sun-sensitizing chemical comes in contact with the skin and reacts with sunlight.”  

 

A photo posted by Delaney (@blondiegrams) on

Apparently, lime and celery are two of the biggest culprits that cause this common condition.  

Olivares told Elite Daily, “the initial rash can appear within 72 hours of sun exposure and can range in severity from skin dryness to blisters.”

 

It’s not hard to see why spring breakers should be especially wary of phytophotodermatitis.  

A photo posted by hellsbells313 (@hellsbells313) on

All it takes is one spilled marg during a sloppy day-drinking session…

 

 

A photo posted by docfink (@docfink) on

…and you can end up with a seriously ugly burn that will definitely put a damper on the rest of your trip.  

However, there are some measures you can take to keep your skin safe.

 

A photo posted by Kate Dreyfuss (@katedreyfuss) on

Olivares told Elite Daily prevention is key. She suggested you “wear a broad spectrum sunscreen and reapply every 80 minutes. If plants or citrus come in contact with the skin, wash it well with soap and water and if skin irritation does occur, a corticosteroid cream can be applied for relief.”  

Written by Kaylin Pound, EliteDaily

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Magical Healing Oral Strips – Soothing Relief for the Next Time You Burn Your Tongue

Come on, you know it’s going to happen. Either you’ll forget or think, “It can’t be that hot,” and before you know it, the top of your tongue will feel like a brillo pad and the rest of your coffee or pizza or cup noodles will be, sadly, tasteless.

Well, scientists are getting real tired of your sh*t, and have taken it upon themselves to develop a new dissolvable oral strip that will provide instant relief for burns caused by eating hot things much too quickly. (I mean, is it really that hard to wait a minute?)

Akin to breath freshening strips, the new strips can be applied directly to nearly any affected area in the mouth and are non-toxic, dissolving quickly for immediate pain relief and to promote healing. No word yet on whether the strips will be commercialized or available for purchase any time soon.

Good news though, lead researcher Jason McConville and his team are now working on creating a stronger strip to treat more “severe” burns which have persisted for more than 2 days.

Chronic tongue burners rejoice, you sick, sadistic freaks.

[Via Geekologie]