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Restaurants Sweets

NYC’s Popular Morgenstern’s Ice Cream Is Now Available Through Nationwide Delivery

Morgenstern's Ice Cream

New York City’s Morgenstern’s Ice Cream is iconic by local standards, what with its unique flavors that don’t over-indulge in excess, yet still boasts much creativity, and most importantly, flavor. Collaborations with the likes of Action Bronson have also helped solidify the shop’s status as a destination for great ice cream in the city.

Now, with the onset of new norms comes a nifty pivot that lets everybody enjoy the frozen treats that only New Yorkers have had a chance to, as Morgenstern’s is now available via nationwide delivery on their website. Here’s a rundown of the goods available:

  • Pick your own pint pack with options for four ($104) or six ($139) pints.
  • A selection of four American Classic pints, including cookies n’ cream, peanut butter cup, schoolyard mint chip and butter pecan ($99).
  • Parlor Favorites of four Morgenstern’s original flavor pints, including chocolate oat, green tea pistachio, raw milk and salt & pepper pine nut ($99).
  • Ice cream cakes, which serve 8-11 in flavors such as Cookies N’ Cream, Honey Vanilla and Salted

Morgenstern’s will be shipping Monday through Friday to the lower 48 states, while all 88 flavors are available for pick-up & delivery via Caviar in NYC.

Categories
Alcohol Cravings Sweets

NYC Residents Can Now Get Boozy Ice Cream Cocktails Delivered

tipsy scoop

Photo: @tipsyscoop

In these trying times, it’s okay to eat or drink your feelings a little bit.  So how about both?

New York City ice cream shop  Tipsy Scoop is now offering its ice cream cocktails to-go and for delivery at happy hour prices of $10 each! This is now possible due to New York City recently passing a law for to-go cocktails for bars and restaurants to maximize take-out options during this hard time. Customers can pre-pay online for a “no touch” option or have a curbside delivery here.

The Brooklyn-based “barlour” is also offering its virtual cocktail party ingredients kits for customers to take home and follow along on Instagram for instructions on how to make your own.

Check out their menu below:

  • Party Like It’s Your Birthday: Cake Batter vodka ice cream, Red velvet martini ice cream, rainbow sprinkles, topped with prosecco. Served with a mini prosecco bottle so you can add more.
  • Cherry Bomb: Vanilla Bean bourbon ice cream topped with Cherry Lambic, garnished with a cherry gummy
  • Night Owl: Cold brew, Sweet Baby Java stout, Spiked Hazelnut coffee ice cream infused with Cafe Patron and Hazelnut liqueur, topped with chocolate fudge
  • Day Drinker: Raspberry Limoncello sorbet, Mango Margarita sorbet, and Strawberry White Sangria sorbet topped with sparkling white wine and garnished with fruit salad gummies
Categories
Cravings Culture Food Trends Restaurants

How Frog Legs Came To Be Synonymous With French Cuisine

Here in the states, frog legs are typically associated with Cajun cuisine, but traditionally, the frog legs we know today originate from the Acadian motherland of France. Archaeological evidence suggests earlier iterations in Southeast Asia, Europe, and even South America, but further information is scarce.

Known in France as Cuisses de Grenouille, frog legs were consumed in response to a 12th Century Catholic Church ban on meat. Apparently, monks enjoyed a king’s diet. Noticing an increase in XXL robe requests, the church authorities decided to prohibit meat consumption for a period of days each year. This imposed “meat-tox” fueled the monk’s resourcefulness and in response, they cleverly had frog legs designated as fish. Consequently, religiously devout locals hopped on the bandwagon, and the rest is fishtory. 

Cuisses de Grenouille is a French national delicacy. To give an example of its popularity, around 80 million frogs are eaten each year. That’s a mind-numbing 160 million frog legs. The most surprising part of this fact is that due to a ban on frog hunting in France, each leg is imported. Let that staggering statistic hop around your mind for a bit.

Like most dishes, frog legs can be prepared in various ways. In France, they’re most commonly cooked using butter, garlic and parsley sauce accompanied by salad or steamed rice. Á la Parisienne, or Paris-style, is another approach that is more akin to chicken wings and involves breading and frying the legs. Lastly, the à la Poulette (white sauce with egg yolk) style is slightly more complicated with its use of a white wine and mushroom sauce reduction.  

Back stateside, New York City is experiencing a froggy resurgence thanks to freshly opened  restaurant Brasserie Saint Marc. Head Chef Frederick Piccarello (former Executive Chef of Le Barricou bistro in Williamsburg) along with owner and Swedish actor Karin Agstam are bringing an amphibious flare to 136 2nd Ave with Cuisse de Grenouille à la Provençal.

In French cuisine, à la Provençal refers to dishes prepared in the style of Provence, France, a southeastern region that borders Italy and the Mediterranean Sea. Provençal ingredients generally include garlic, onions, tomatoes, mushrooms, eggplant, and olive oil. Chef Piccarello’s Cuisse de Grenouille a la Provençal is sautéed in garlic and parsley butter and served with roasted tomatoes and Yukon gold potatoes. It keeps with tradition while paired with an American twist.

Owner Karin Agstam’s attraction to French cuisine comes from her time spent in Paris studying art at Sorbonne University at the receptive age of 18. Experiencing Parisian brasseries with their classic menu offerings made a lasting impression. It’s this experience that she hopes to share with Brasserie Saint Marc, a passion project four years in the making. If you have a predilection for French cuisine with an American edge, look no further than Brasserie Saint Marc — but don’t forget the longstanding connection of French cuisine and frog legs.

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News What's New

The Eleven Regional Hot Dogs Everyone Needs In Their Life

There aren’t many things on this green earth that unify, and simultaneously drive apart, Americans quite like hot dogs, besides maybe politics and the NFL (which may as well be the same thing at this point, much to the chagrin of “Stick to Sports” Twitter). Hot dogs are universal in the sense that they’re consumed at every corner of the country. They’re also quite divisive, in that each region has their own spin on the mystery sausage, and which one is the best is a oft-debated subject.

Cities and states lay claim to hot dogs like BBQ and famous nightclubs. The Chicago dog, Dodger dog, Seattle-style dog, Detroit dog — all delicacies that locals will fiercely defend to their graves.

In truth, most of these dogs are remarkably similar: dog, buns, onions, peppers, cheese, and some kind of sauce. The attachment lies in the intrinsic pride that comes with the down-home origin story of each dog, most of which were long ago enough to not be quite remembered, as well as memories of better days and sleepless nights spent with friends stumbling into a hot dog vendor at just the right time.

One such cherished hot dog is Detroit’s Coney Island dog, which combines a Dearborn Sausage Company hot dog with beanless chili, a hit of mustard, chopped raw onions, and, of course, a helping of shredded cheddar cheese. These dogs are a part of the city’s culinary backbone, a place where a preference between local landmark American Coney Island or it’s next-door counterpart Lafayette can strain friendships. 

A few days ago, on Foodbeast’s podcast, The Katchup, hosts Elie Ayrouth and Geoffrey Kutnick were joined by Chris Sotiropoulos, the owner of American Coney Island to discuss the creation of the Detroit’s esteemed Coney Island Dogs. The company’s recent expansion to Las Vegas gives West Coaster’s the chance to try a regional dog that would be otherwise unobtainable. With the Coney fresh on our mind, the Foodbeast office began to think of other specialty dogs out there that we haven’t tried. 

So, we hit the streets and found eleven hometown favorites that we wish we could try, and here they are:

Sonoran Style

 

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The Sonoran hot dog starts with a frank wrapped in crispy bacon. Created in Tucson, AZ, the dog pays homage to the city’s Latino roots by using a split soft roll called a bolillo, and topping that with pinto beans, chopped tomatoes, diced onions, creamy mayo, mustard, and jalapeños. 

Chicago Style

 

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Maybe one of the most famous options on this list, the Chicago-style dog is as much a staple to the city as its biting wind. It uses a steamed Vienna sausage all-beef dog, which is then placed in a steamed poppy seed bun, and painted with the bright colors of tomato slices, sport peppers, dill pickle, chopped raw onion, relish, celery salt, and a drizzle of bright yellow mustard.

Scrambled Dog

 

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The Scrambled Dog was born in Columbus, GA 72 years ago, the brainchild of the late Lieutenant Stevens. This beast of a plate starts with a soft bun, then Stevens’ fresh chili, cut up weiners, more chili, raw onions, dill pickle slices, and a heaping handful of crunchy oyster crackers. 

Seattle Style Dog

 

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A Seattle-style hot dog consists of a grilled, split frank, nestled on a toasted bun that’s been smothered in cream cheese, grilled onions and, often, jalapeños. It makes sense that these are typically eaten during late nights out, because it sounds like something I would make with some potluck leftovers at 2AM.

Tater Pig

 

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This… is what it sounds like. A specialty of the Twin Falls County Fair, this monstrosity does just enough to constitute as a hot dog. Really, it’s a sausage. And it’s stuffed inside of a baked potato. Hence, the tater pig. 

Polish Boy

 

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Cleveland’s late night sausage of choice is a grilled kielbasa (a sausage broadly described as “any type of meat sausage from Poland.” Thanks Wikipedia). Place one of these guys on a sturdy bun, and top it with a handful of fries, coleslaw, BBQ sauce, as well as hot sauce, and you have yourself a Polish Boy.

Dodger Dog

 

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Los Angeles’ Chavez Ravine favorite has both steamed and grilled variations. Either way, the result is a ten-inch pork hot dog embraced in an equally as long bun, marked with relish, mustard, ketchup, and chopped raw onions. 

Carolina Style

 

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This version of the hot dog is popular amongst much of the Southeast United States. Beginning with an all-beef frank stuffed in a soft bun, it’s then covered in chili and piled high with coleslaw. Most people like to add mustard as well, to offset the sweetness of the slaw and savoriness of the chili.

New York Dog

 

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Contrary to every other aspect of their lives, New Yorkers like to keep their hot dogs simple. Strictly boiled in water of mysterious circumstances on a street cart, these dogs are topped with only mustard and sauerkraut for buyers to quickly shove down.

Italian Dog

 

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The answer to every New Jerseyan’s hangover, this dog originated in Newark. Here, bakers make plush loaves of pizza bread, which are like massive pizza crusts. After being split open, the bread is stuffed with a lightly fried dog, onions, peppers, and more deep-fried potatoes than can fit.

Tijuana Dog

 

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The Tijuana dog, though named after the town in Mexico in which it originates, gained it’s fame off the streets of L.A. Sold largely from street carts outside of sports games and clubs, this dog is wrapped in bacon and fried until crispy and snappy. It’s tossed into a soft bun and then served with grilled onions and peppers, mayo, mustard, ketchup, and sometimes a grilled jalapeño to give it some kick.

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Health News Now Trending Plant-Based Restaurants What's New

A ‘Beyond Sausage’ Egg and Cheese Is Dunkin’s Latest Addition to Their Revitalized Menu

The plant-based protein takeover continues. 

Dunkin’ Brands Group Inc. announced this morning that, starting today, July 24th, a breakfast sandwich with Beyond Meat Inc.’s plant-based protein will be available in all of their Manhattan locations.

The new item is a version of the classic sausage, egg, and cheese with a plant-based sausage patty. They throw their hat into the ring of fast food joints using Beyond’s plant-based protein, along with Tim Horton’s, Del Taco, and Carl’s Jr.

It’ll be sold for $4.29, about the running price of a normal breakfast sandwich at Dunkin’. Each franchise can set their own price, but if that’s the price of it in one of the most expensive places to live on Earth then it shouldn’t be too much of a problem when the sandwich goes nationwide. 

When that will actually be is a mystery, though. Dunkin’s representative said that the company plans to bring the sandwich to every location soon, but they’re not sure exactly when. 

The question is, as it is with all plant-based products, does it taste like the real thing? Luckily, fellow Foodbeast Reach Guinto got an early taste.

“I would take it over any other sausage sandwich.” he said. “It tastes exactly like the real deal, except it won’t give me a heart attack.”

If you ask me, that’s about as good as it gets — all the health, none of the heart attack. The meat industry is shaking in its boots.

 

Hopefully, soon all health-conscious Foodbeasts (if I eat plant-based the next morning, it evens out the carne asada fries I had last night, right?) will have a chance to try this plant-based breakfast. Until then, live it up Manhattan.

Categories
Alcohol Drinks

Bar Recreates One Of George Washington’s Favorite Drinks By Sticking A Red Hot Poker Into Beer

Photo: Cian Lahart

Everyone has a drink they like to unwind with at the end of a long day, even a Founding Father. In case you ever wanted to experience what a prolific figure like George Washington would order at a bar, one of his beverages of choice is now being recreated in the 21st century.

Porterhouse Brew Co. is offering the historical drink known as a Hot Ale Flip for a month at the New York Bar, located in the Financial District.

Made with molasses, egg whites, rum, and ale, the drink is completed by sticking a red hot fireplace poker straight into the concoction to warm it up. Though, as health precautions changed over the past few hundred years, the fireplace poker has since been replaced with an ale warmer loggerhead.

Originally served at the iconic Fraunces Tavern, sister restaurant to Porterhouse Brew Co., Hot Ale Flips were believed to be one of George Washington’s favorite orders back when he visited the Tavern and a was also a popular sailor’s drink that was served during the Colonial era.

Not sure how I feel about warm ale quite yet, but my curiosity is piqued.

The Hot Ale Flips will be available now through March 19 for anyone hoping to experience a taste of history to enjoy.

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#foodbeast Cravings FOODBEAST Restaurants What's New

Bacon Cannoli Exists Because ‘Tis The Season To Indulge

 

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Oftentimes when we’re braving the cold of winter, thoughts of seasonal nostalgia bring us warmth: family all gathered around the fire, drinking egg nog, with bacon cannolis being passed around for all to enjoy. No, don’t rub your eyes, bacon cannoli is a real thing and of course it should be a part of your holiday festivities. Because bacon and maple ricotta filling.

Probably seeing that very same vision I have of winter indulgence (time to start building up our extra layer of fat insulation for the cold), BarBacon, the hog haven in New York City, is offering up bacon cannolis with perfectly paired maple ricotta filling. If your mind’s eye is still needing the HD turned up, picture a cannoli, only that the shell is a whole piece of BACON bacon. The filling? A rich and creamy maple ricotta that compliments the bacon more than your ex does after you’ve glo’d up and gotten your life together. Oh and let’s go ahead and throw on some powdered sugar in slow-mo to really amp up the seasonal vibes.

The bacon cannolis are now available for dessert and are sold as part of BarBacon’s Holiday packages, 6 pieces for $24. As of now they’re only a seasonal item, but if they do well enough (don’t see why not), they could be a permanent fixture on the menu.

Categories
Deals Restaurants

Popular NYC Ramen Shop Is Giving Away 1,000 Free Bowls For One Day Only

Photo Courtesy of Ippudo Ramen

One of my must-visit ramen joints when I’m in New York has got to be Ippudo. While I’m anxiously waiting for the Santa Monica location to open, my mind drifts to the cold winters where I would consume their ambrosial tonkotsu broth with mind, body, and soul.

For those ramen romantics who will happen to be in New York next week, Ippudo will be giving away 1,000 free bowls of ramen in honor of their 10th anniversary here in the United States on Oct. 16.

Photo Courtesy of Ippudo Ramen

Festivities will last for one day and, upon opening, patrons of the first East Village location will be served free bowls of ramen while supplies last. Obviously this will be a first-come, first-serve, basis so if you’re in the area and want that free bowl of ramen, we recommend you get there early to secure your place in line.

Ippudo’s Santa Monica location can not come soon enough. Perhaps a trip to the Berkeley, CA, spot may satiate my cravings until then.