Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Some Guy Found a Medieval Guide to Cooking Unicorn Meat

unicorn

How do you tell if you’ve found the perfect cut of unicorn? Is it the marbling, signature to stock raised on fairy dust feed? Is it the grade, prímsang, corennes, or selecte? And what about the rarer breeds? Does a Narnian unicorn really taste all that better than an Equestrian one?

About a year ago, the British library discovered a recipe for unicorn meat in a Fourteenth Century cookbook. Unfortunately, supposed royal chef Geoffrey Fule left no insight as to which Ye Olde Ralfe’s might carry the choicest unicorn steaks in all the land, but he did understand the magic of a few garlic cloves.

unicorn2

Reads the British Library’s description:

“After recipes for herring, tripe and codswallop (fish stew, a popular dish in the Middle Ages) comes that beginning ‘Taketh one unicorne.’ The recipe calls for the beast to be marinaded in cloves and garlic, and then roasted on a griddle. The cookbook’s compiler, doubtless Geoffrey Fule himself, added pictures in its margins, depicting the unicorn being prepared and then served.”

Sounds yummy, although, if it’s anything like horse, we suspect it could be a bit gamey. Might be better to stick to the canned dragon meat.

H/T + PicThx British Library