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Disney Partners With Impossible Foods for Plant-Based Expansion

Photo provided by Impossible Foods

Disneyland Resorts and Parks, as well as Florida-based big brother The Walt Disney World Resort, are known to offer an experience that keeps your inner child alive and kicking. Everything from immersive theme rides to life-sized Disney characters spread over 30,000 acres, it’s hard not to enjoy, if not a tad overly stimulating. Ever-watchful of ways to expand upon the entertainment incentive, Disney has now joined the Impossible Foods movement in a newly inked partnership. 

Impossible Foods is now the official plant-based “burger vendor” for both Disney resorts including Disney Cruise Line ships. The partnership comes following their September 2019 announcement to introduce meatless items to all Disney resorts.

To sweeten the deal even further, we’re also rewarded with three new menu items: the Impossible Cheeseburger macaroni and cheese, Petite Impossible Burger with guacamole and cheddar jack cheese, and an Impossible Meatball sub sandwich.

With the demand for meat alternatives growing globally each year, this is a natural move for the Happiest Place on Earth. The new Impossible menu items are now available at all Disney resorts.

Photo provided by Impossible Foods
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Smithfield Foods Enters the Plant-Based Race

Plant-based meat alternatives are on the rise with a new contender entering the ring almost daily. It’s been a pleasure trying out these new alternatives and experiencing the similarities and differences. The latest contender is Smithfield Foods and they’re wasting no time in making their intentions known by announcing a “plant-based portfolio” called Pure Farmland. This portfolio features an array of plant-based options suitable for every meal throughout the day. Alternatives include burger patties, meatballs, breakfast patties, and protein starters. They are soy-based, made with natural flavors, gluten/soy-free, and entirely crafted in the United States. 

Pure Farmland is catered to the “flexitarian” diet which is becoming more common as people are learning about plant-based alternatives. They chose soy protein over pea protein, which many brands use, because studies show that 59% of consumers prefer soy to pea protein’s 41%. John Pauley, Chief Commercial Officer for Smithfield Foods had this to say:

“We’ve been exploring the alternative protein space, and have taken our time to get it right. With this launch, we are bringing together our expertise in creating market-leading food products, our organizational commitment to sustainability, and our deep understanding of ‘flexitarian’ consumers, to deliver a broad variety of flavorful plant-based protein choices that consumers want and can afford at a great value.”

To further cement their mission towards offering quality protein products in an environmentally responsible way, Pure Farmland’s packaging is made of 50% recyclable material. They are also proud partners of The Farmland Trust, a national conservation organization dedicated to protecting farmland. You can find Pure Farmland’s products located in refrigerated sections of your local grocery store beginning mid-September.

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Animals Food Policy Food Trends Products Science

Missouri Becomes The First State To Ban Vegans From Calling Meat Alternatives ‘Meat’

It’s only been a few months since France’s controversial ban on how meat alternatives could be marketed was enacted. Their new law prevents companies from describing something as “meat” that’s predominantly made from plants.

Other factions have taken the opportunity to jump on board with what France is doing, including Missouri, who just became the first U.S. state to impose a similar, more overarching ban.

vegan meat banPhoto: Peter Pham // Foodbeast

Missouri’s new law, which was passed in mid-May and takes effect today, forbids “misrepresenting a product as meat that is not derived from harvested livestock or poultry.” That includes cultured or lab-grown meats on top of those that are predominantly plants. Those who violate the law can be fined up to $1,000 or imprisoned for up to 1 year, according to USA Today.

The language within the new law means that any vegan form of meat can’t be called as such anymore. Titles like vegan meatballs, plant-based bacon, or even lab-grown beef are no longer legal in Missouri, meaning that if those companies want to sell their products there, they have to be renamed if they violate the law.

Behind the law is the Missouri Cattleman’s Association, who backed the bill with reasonings that include protecting local ranchers and preventing customer confusion when shopping.

Interestingly, beef has actually been on an upswing in recent years despite the prevalence of plant-based products. The USDA predicts a record 222.2 pounds of beef and poultry will be consumed by each person in 2018, a number that hasn’t been this high since 2004. It’s also improbable that there’s a ton of consumer confusion when it comes to labeling, as companies clearly state whether their “meat” products are made from plants or not.

Plant-based producers aren’t going quietly in this battle, though, as Tofurky and The Good Food Institute (a plant-based advocacy group) have already launched a lawsuit against the state, saying that the law is an attack on their freedom of speech and commercial speech. They also claim that Missouri’s new legislation is unconstitutional for that reason.