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Miller64 Makes Math Easy

As sports bettors continue to run the numbers for Super Bowl LVI, the folks at Miller are posing a different math problem to light beer fans. Given the release of a new light beer that’s 80 calories, Miller64 wants to know which number is smaller — 80 or 64?

After a recent survey that seemed to stump 7% of Americans, the brand enlisted the help of Ken Ono, world-renowned mathematician and current Thomas Jefferson Professor of Mathematics at the University of Virginia, to do the math (see below).

Ono, who also serves as the section chair for mathematics at the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is an expert in number theory, has published over 200 research articles and was awarded a Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering by a former president. Despite this, he still had questions about why 7% of Americans think 80 is smaller than 64.

When asked to solve this particular equation, Ono stated, “I’ve seen a lot of complicated mathematical equations in my career, and worked to solve some of the most complex integer partitions and modular forms, but what I can’t understand is why anyone would think 80 is smaller than 64? I can confirm, 64 is most certainly smaller than 80.”

“Not only have we found the correct answer to which number is smaller, we’ve also found the perfect recipe for an extra light beer with Miller64,” adds Sofia Colucci, Global Marketing Vice President – Miller and Economy Portfolios. “It doesn’t take a genius to do the math, but we’re glad Ken Ono was able to help prove us right.”

Beer lovers and aspiring mathematicians who believe they know the correct answer to which is smaller — 80 or 64 — can visit whatnumberissmaller.com to prove their knowledge of simple math. Get it right and you can claim a free six-pack of Miller64, just in time for this weekend.

Someone needs to check on that 7% though. SMH.

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Hit-Or-Miss

This Professor Uses Food To Help Students Better Understand Math

Food-Prof

Eugenia Cheng, a senior lecturer at the University of Sheffield in the UK, has a passion for math. However, Cheng knows that the subject can be overwhelming for some students and has found a way to teach the concepts to a wider audience.

She uses food.

It started when she was explaining a theory to students when she realized she could illustrate it best with blueberry jelly and yogurt. Cheng then switched gears and pretended she was on a cooking show as she explained the aspect of algebraic number theory, Wired reports.

Since, Cheng uses food as a powerful teaching tool that seems to work just fine with her students. Cheng has also written an entire cook/textbook based on her methods: How to Bake π: An Edible Exploration of the Mathematics of Mathematics.

Check out one of her many food-based lectures below.