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Brand Food Fashion Food Trends Packaged Food Pop-Ups Products What's New

Bloomingdale’s and Peach Mart Collaborate on a Snack Box featuring Asia’s Favorite Munchies

New York radio legend Minya Oh, best known as Miss Info, has curated a selection of Seoul-inspired goods for Bloomingdale’s seventh edition of “The Carousel: Window Into Seoul.” The Carousel is a rotating pop-up concept inspired by the idea, “retail is theatre,” which was coined by past Bloomingdale’s CEO Marvin Traub. Driven by culturally relevant themes and curated by special guest tastemakers, The Carousel adds a bit of “retailtainment” to the Bloomingdale’s experience. 

The latest concept honors South Korea as a cultural hub on the forefront of beauty, fashion, and music. To offer an authentic experience, Miss Info chose products from 25 trend-setting Seoul-based brands including W Concept, the largest fashion e-commerce and multi-brand retailer in Korea, and Amorepacific, one of the world’s largest cosmetics companies based in South Korea. There’s no shortage of options with products ranging between fashion, beauty, home categories as well as popular snacks. 

Home categories offer an array of products to enhance your domestic life like a Philips smokeless grill, a mandolin from OXO, a Scoby Kombucha kit and a rice cooker from Zojirushi.

This munchie experience is offered in Peach Mart snack boxes. Peach Mart is a take-away shop from Chef David Chang’s Momofuku. Snack connoisseurs are sure to be in heaven with each box containing a wide selection of popular snacks like Pocky and Koala’s March, perfect for sharing with a friend. In addition to snacks, “Window Into Seoul,” also offers three savory sauces from KPOP Foods, an up and coming Korean flavor-inspired brand. Flavors included are kimchi, honey glaze and their special KPOP sauce.

You can get your Asian snacks fix from “Window Into Seoul” at four Bloomingdale’s locations — 59th Street, Soho, Century City, San Francisco  and online from September 5th through November 4th. 

 

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#foodbeast Cravings FOODBEAST Hit-Or-Miss Packaged Food Restaurants SPONSORED

This Torta Goes Full Beast Mode With STACKS Of Salami And Tater Tots


The chilly streets of San Francisco just got a warming new dish that takes torta ahogada to tasty new heights.

Found at Tacorea, a downtown San Francisco spot fusing together Korean and Mexican specialties, this Tortally Beast Mode Torta comes loaded far beyond the standard sandwich. It’s based on Tacorea’s Big Ricardo, a massive wet burrito drenched in salsa, but also salutes locally-made charcuterie.

You’ll find stacks of Bay Area-made Columbus Craft Meats Italian Dry Salame and mountains of crispy tots piled inside with carnitas, guac, cheese, and pico de gallo. The entire sandwich is then covered in an ahogada sauce whose heat will wipe out any traces of the SF winter.

All of the torta’s ingredients combine to create a unique combination of sensations. The Columbus Italian Dry Salame adds an aromatic punch, while the tater tots provide a crunchy twist to the sandwich.

The Tortally Beast Mode Torta will be sure to keep your body warm and belly content while walking through San Francisco’s Winter Walk, a Union Square holiday event sponsored by Columbus Craft Meats. However, you’ll have to be quick to get it. Tacorea will be serving up limited quantities of the torta for the entire month of December.


Created in partnership with Columbus Craft Meats. 

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#foodbeast Adventures FOODBEAST Video

It Was Lit: We Tried To Conquer The #KTOWNSPICYCHALLENGE

“Dude, I heard there’s this dish here in Koreatown, at this joint called Yup Dduk, that claims to be the spiciest in Los Angeles. They call it the KTown Spicy Challenge or something.”

My buddy Mike, who runs the @Koreatown Instagram handle, piqued my interest immediately with this little tidbit. If there’s anybody that knows KTown well, it was him.

When it comes to spicy food, my tongue’s threshold is that of any average mortal, with a sensitivity that likes to call it quits once it hits habanero territory. I can handle spicy food just fine, but really, I’ve never been the type to go out of my way to put myself through any sort of punishment, especially when it comes to eating. So for me to even consider putting my trusty palate through unprecedented levels of heat speaks more to my dangerous curiosity than anything.

They say its the spiciest dish in L.A., eh? Hmm, bet. I mean how bad could it actually be, right?

I enlisted the help of my good friend Wally, a well-versed foodbeast in his own right, to help me tackle the daunting task that is the #KTOWNSPICYCHALLENGE.

Pandora’s Box opened up at the corner of 6th and Normandie, in the heart of Los Angeles’ Koreatown, the location of Yup Dduk. Its specific contents? A gigantic bowl of veritable magma. Peep the fiery deets: Korean rice cakes (ddukbokki), ramen noodles, sausages, fish cake, cheese, and a lethal helping of the spiciest pepper in all of Korea, the Ttangcho pepper.

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At first bite, the Ttangcho introduced itself to me assertively, smacking sense into all my left brain function, letting me know that yes, curiosity always kills cats, and that I was now clinging to just a few of those proverbial nine lives from here on out.  I’m re-thinking all known reason at this point.

But Diddy would be proud, because there ain’t no bitchassedness in these dudes. I shoveled in more of the molten lava, willing myself to go on. Each bite felt like tongue-kissing the devil while riding Rapidash bareback.

Yet to be pummeled by wave after wave of the spicy ddukbokki was quickly taking it’s toll. I look over at Wally and manage to blurt out half-meant encouragement.

“Yeah, we got 2% done bruh.” Wally’s deadpan delivery let some of that realness sink in: Ttangcho ain’t going nowhere but right through us. We were both sweating like two pigs on a spit, rotating closer and closer to our expected demise. The end was near, and were it not for a few rallying comments from our awesome viewers of this spectacle’s livestream, then our fates would have been sealed a lot quicker.

Wally and I tapped out nearly 30 minutes later, spirits singed, tongues wagging, scorched earth left in the wake of the #KTOWNSPICYCHALLENGE. It claimed two more lives that day, business as usual for L.A.’s spiciest dish.

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Location: Yup Dduk LA, 3603 W. 6th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90020

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Cravings Fast Food Restaurants What's New

UNPRECEDENTED: This Korean BBQ Joint Will Deliver Right To Your Doorstep

Gen-Delivers

There have been many occasions where we’re craving Korean BBQ. Sadly, most places have a two person minimum in order to dine in. Luckily, there’s a loophole.

Gen, the popular California-based Korean BBQ chain, is now offering a service called Gen Delivers. There, patrons can call in and order a selection of frozen meats for $45. While this isn’t exactly all-you-can-eat, the company says that two people have yet been able to finish the meats in one sitting.

Hey, we’re always up for a challenge.

A typical dine-in experience at the restaurant costs about $45 between two people, the only difference is you won’t have to leave your house to enjoy it. You also have to provide your own method of grilling the meat.

Well at least you don’t have to find a plus one to satiate you KBBQ cravings.

Photo: Gen

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Hit-Or-Miss

Why Koreans Eat Boiling Hot Soup During The Hottest Days Of Summer

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It is a little known fact that many Koreans love their boiling bowls of soup the most during the hottest days of summer, so it would not be unusual to find them downing steaming hot samgyetang (chicken ginseng soup) during an oppressively humid afternoon.

In Korea, they say, “fight fire with fire!,” restaurant owner Choi Mi-hee told Vice. “[Samgyetang] has benefits because when it’s too hot, we eat cold things. Our stomach gets colder but the rest of us stays hot. So we have to make it the same temperature.”

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Such belief brings a flock of patrons to Choi’s Gangwon Toon Samgyetang in Ilsan, Korea during the three hottest days of Korean summer —chobok, jungbok, and malbo. It is widely believed that eating the soup three times in this period is good for a person’s health.

“When we eat samgyetang, we can get our stamina back,” Choi claimed.

The special soup is often consumed with ginseng liquor or soju.

Samgyetang is cooked with month-old chicken that fits whole into a bowl. The still tender meat is filled with garlic and rice and then cooked with ginseng, jujube, milk vetch root, and chestnut as basic ingredients with other ingredients depending on who’s cooking. Choi, for her part, includes eight additional special ingredients that she did not want to reveal.

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The popular Korean specialty is getting more attention abroad. Canned and frozen samgyetang has recently been exported to and found popularity in China. Like in Korea, the Chinese believe that the soup can prevent illnesses.

Choi insists that while the meal itself may contain more than 1,000 calories per bowl, samgyetang is still a better option than what is available out there.

“Nowadays, a lot of Koreans eat a lot of junk food,” said Choi, “But samgyetang doesn’t have chemical ingredients and is natural and healthy.”

Written by Ryan General, NextShark

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Hit-Or-Miss

Controversial Experiment Forced Koreans To Try ‘Dog Meat’ And They Weren’t Happy

Koreans-Dog-Meat-Experiment

In a pretty controversial social experiment, a group of five Korean people asked to participate in an experiment called “Try Foods from Around the World.” They were given different dishes and had to guess where they thought the dish came from.

Pretty innocent, right?

It was only after they tasted one particular dish that they were immediately told it was dog meat.

The group did not take the news well.

Soon after the groups reactions were caught on tape, they were relieved to discover it wasn’t dog meat. Rather, they had eaten lamb and were lied to.

Check out the pretty powerful video.

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Humor

Korean Girls Try American & Mexican Sodas For The First Time [WATCH]

Digitalsoju TV is back with another hilarious adventure with foreign girls trying local things! We’ve seen Korean girls try American barbecue and American pizza. This time, we’re going to see these lovely young ladies try American and Mexican sodas for the first time.

The girls are given a variety of drinks, from Mexico’s famed Jarritos to America’s classic Barq’s Root Beer to the oft forgotten citrusy taste of Squirt.

According to the girls, many of the flavors are flavors not often found in Korea, like root beer and guava Jarritos.

You can check out the girls eating barbecue here, or cruise here to see them trying good ol’ fashioned American pizza.

Categories
Humor

This Man Got Slapped by Kimchi in a Korean Soap Opera [WATCH]

This video is by no means new, but since I can ignorantly dub it The Kimchi Slap Heard ‘Round the World, none of that timeliness seems relevant to me.

Extra kudos to both the actors in this film (or TV show?) for not breaking character. I’m sure someone in the comments will end up revealing to me via a Wikipedia link where this clip came from and then instill a warranted insecurity for my terrible journalism, but seriously, This Is The Kimchi Slap Heard Around the Woooorld!