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Tastemade/Snapchat

10 Things You Might Not Know About Fermentation

Fermentation is a glorious chemical reaction that converts a carbohydrate/sugar to alcohol or acid. Our founding father, George Washington, was so down with fermentation that he owned his own whiskey distillery. The waste his distillery produced was used to feed his pigs, which had to have made the best tasting bacon. If you’re short one presidential distillery, but want to learn more about fermented goods, keep reading.

1. Fermentation increases the nutritional value of raw produce.

lacto-fermentation-861551_640

In addition to the ramped up vitamins and minerals, fermented vegetables carry friendly bacteria and live enzymes. These cultures are beneficial to both your digestive and nervous system while protecting our bodies from harmful bacteria and other toxic substances.

2. Ancient Chinese people may have fermented the first alcoholic beverage.

beer-barrel-956322_640

A blend of rice, honey, and grapes, a 3,000 year old beverage was discovered in clay pots from 7000-6600 BC. Corrosion sealed the pots over time, preserving the beer-wine hybrid for modern scientists to analyze. Dogfish Head Brewery recreated the drink in 2005, with the help of the researchers, and it won a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival in 2009.

3. Kefir gives you a good night’s sleep.

strawberry-drink-1411374_640

Not to be confused with the actor from 24, this protein-rich drink contains tryptophan. That’s the same amino acid causing you to yawn after that turkey dinner. Bonus: a serving of this milk-based pro-biotic provides 20% of the daily calcium you need.

4. Soy sauce is a pain in the ass to make.

sushi-689645_640

The sauce you dip sushi in takes months to produce. Its brown hue occurs during fermentation, when a chemical reaction of fungus and grain converts soybeans to simple sugars, amino acids and proteins.

5. Sourdough was more valuable than gold.

desembrood-997529_640

That delicious bread bowl we eat clam chowder out of was an integral part of the Gold Rush era. Alaskans would literally sleep with the dough to keep the yeast in it alive. San Franciscans enjoy their bread so much, their 49er mascot is named Sourdough Sam.

6. Kimchi is the national dish of South Korea.

kimchi-709607_640

Commonly found in KBBQ cuisine as one of many banchan dishes to munch on while grilling, a custom (read: non-stinky) version accompanied Yi So-Yeon, the first Korean astronaut in space. When stored properly, a jar of kimchi can last for a couple of years.

7. Tempeh is tofu’s kick ass cousin.

tempeh

Photo Credit: FotoosVanRobin
While both are made from soybeans, their similarities end there. This Indonesian meat substitute has a better texture, making for tasty versions of fried chicken and tacos. The Swedish Department of Food Science even found a way to create this vegan-friendly protein without soybeans (with a blend of oats and barley) in regions where they can’t thrive.

8. Dosas are basically fancy crepes.

dosas

Photo Credit: Roland

A fermented batter of rice and lentils, this popular South Indian snack is delicate and paper-thin when grilled properly. It’s the country’s answer to sliced bread, often stuffed with pickles and flavorful chutney sauces. To eat it like a local, put down the fork and knife and get your hands in there.

9.You can wear kombucha.

SCOBY_mushroom

Photo Credit: Lukas Chin

Microbial cellulose is the scientific term for dried kombucha culture, the “living,” tea-based beverage. A leathery texture, cellulose can be manipulated to create seamless clothing. Not bad for a fizzy and protein-rich drink that’s been around for over 2,000 years.

10. Sauerkraut helps you poop. 

sauerkraut-655062_640

This bland-looking, German condiment is best known as a sausage topping. The shredded stuff shouldn’t, however, be mistaken for the pickled variety: the only ingredient mixed with cabbage is salt. Unpasteurized kraut carries the same kind of healthy bacteria found in yogurt, helping with both digestion and constipation.

 

Categories
Tastemade/Snapchat

9 Facts About Fermented Foods That You Probably Didn’t Know

Fermentation is a glorious chemical reaction that converts a carbohydrate/sugar to alcohol or acid. Our founding father, George Washington, was so down with fermentation that he owned his own whiskey distillery. The waste his distillery produced was used to feed his pigs, which had to have made the best tasting bacon. If you’re short one presidential distillery, but want to learn more about fermented goods, keep reading.

1. Fermentation increases the nutritional value of raw produce

preserved-vegetables-fb

In addition to the ramped up vitamins and minerals, fermented vegetables carry friendly bacteria and live enzymes. These cultures are beneficial to both your digestive and nervous system while protecting our bodies from harmful bacteria and other toxic substances.

2. Ancient Chinese people may have fermented the first alcoholic beverage

a98a1103-03a8-4e4b-ea7e-8236a7f1b5ee

In what was a blend of rice, honey, and grapes, a 3,000 year old beverage was discovered in clay pots made in 7000-6600 BC. Corrosion sealed the pots over time, preserving the last batch of the beer-wine hybrid for modern scientists to analyze. Dogfish Head Brewery recreated the drink, Midas Touch, in 2005 with the help of the researchers, and it won a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival in 2009.

3. Kefir gives you a good night’s sleep

kefir-grains-1024x684

Not to be confused with the actor from 24, this protein-rich drink contains tryptophan. That’s the same amino acid causing you to yawn after that turkey dinner. Bonus: a serving of this milk-based pro-biotic provides 20% of the daily calcium you need.

4. Sourdough was more valuable than gold

Artisan-Sourdough-Bread-Tips-85-900x600

That delicious bread bowl we eat clam chowder out of was an integral part of the Gold Rush era. Alaskans would literally sleep with the dough to keep the yeast in it alive. San Franciscans enjoy their bread so much, their 49er mascot is named Sourdough Sam.

5. Kimchi is the national dish of South Korea

kimchi-4

A true staple in Korean cuisine, a custom (read: non-stinky) version accompanied Yi So-Yeon, the first Korean astronaut in space. When stored properly, a jar of kimchi can last for a couple of years.

6. Tempeh is tofu’s kick-ass cousin.

tempeh

While both are made from soybeans, their similarities end there. This Indonesian meat substitute has a better texture, making for tasty versions of fried chicken and tacos. The Swedish Department of Food Science even found a way to create this vegan-friendly protein without soybeans (with a blend of oats and barley) in regions where they can’t thrive.

7. Dosas are basically fancy crepes

Masala Dosa

A fermented batter of rice and lentils, this popular South Indian snack is delicate and paper-thin when grilled properly. It’s the country’s answer to sliced bread, often stuffed with pickles and flavorful chutney sauces. To eat it like a local, put down the fork and knife and get your hands in there.

8. You can wear kombucha

lee-biobomber-jacket

 

Microbial cellulose is the scientific term for dried kombucha culture, the “living,” tea-based beverage. A leathery texture, cellulose can be manipulated to create seamless clothing. Not bad for a fizzy and protein-rich drink that’s been around for over 2,000 years.

9. Sauerkraut helps you poop

14852461299_a82ef3c397_b

This aesthetically bland, German condiment is best known as a sausage topping. The shredded stuff shouldn’t, however, be mistaken for the pickled variety: the only ingredient mixed with cabbage is salt. Unpasteurized kraut carries the same kind of healthy bacteria found in yogurt, helping with both digestion and constipation.

Categories
Celebrity Grub

Watch Chloe Grace Moretz Slap A Dude With A Giant Piece Of Kimchi

Actress Chloe Grace Moretz recently appeared on South Korea’s version of Saturday Night Live. The former Hit-Girl from the Kick-Ass film series performed in a sketch playing the love interest of a young Korean man.

Now about a year ago, there was a video going around of a Korean woman slapping a man with a giant piece of kimchi.

In this sketch, Moretz is visiting her fiancee’s family and recreates emotions of that Korean drama by slapping her beau with, you guessed it, a fat piece of kimchi.

RocketNews 24 provides some context for those who don’t speak Korean. The man suggests to Moretz’s character that they move into a rental space together after they get married. According to traditional customs, a man must buy a house for his bride to live in before they’re married.

Check out the hilarious video for the entire to see for yourselves.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Study Shows Pickled Foods Might Help Minimize Anxiousness

Pickle-Anxiety

A recent study showed that there’s a connection between pickles and anxiousness. Turns out picked foods might make you less anxious.

Seven hundred students took part in a study conducted by researchers at the William & Mary and the University of Maryland, reports Science Daily. Those who were comfortable eating pickled foods like kimchi and sauerkraut suffered less social anxiety than those unfamiliar with pickled foods. According to the report, the effect was strongest among those high in neuroticism.

The study was published in the August issue of Psychiatry Research.

Next time we’re anxious about something, we’ll bite a pickle and see what happens.

Categories
Humor

This Man Got Slapped by Kimchi in a Korean Soap Opera [WATCH]

This video is by no means new, but since I can ignorantly dub it The Kimchi Slap Heard ‘Round the World, none of that timeliness seems relevant to me.

Extra kudos to both the actors in this film (or TV show?) for not breaking character. I’m sure someone in the comments will end up revealing to me via a Wikipedia link where this clip came from and then instill a warranted insecurity for my terrible journalism, but seriously, This Is The Kimchi Slap Heard Around the Woooorld!

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#foodbeast

Kimchi Bulgogi Nachos

kimchi nachos

Recipe: Two Red Bowls

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#foodbeast

Never start an argument with someone holding a giant kimchi

kimchi-slap

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Research Shows More People Are Talking About ‘Grilled Cheese’ than Cronuts, Poutine & Juicing Combined

Apparently, if you’re still craving Cronuts and tweeting about it, you’re part of the 1% of netizens that still care. The rest have moved onto ramen-crusted chicken wings and grilled cheese sandwiches — the next unspoiled “foodie” territory being conquered.

How did we come to such a pretentious conclusion? We got word of a new tool dubbed Microsoft Social Listening, which pings Facebook, Twitter and blogs (sites with a url) for buzzwords in order to determine what’s trending on the internet. Sentiment for a food term is graded by keywords within an article and headlines, ranging from “positive” words like delicious and wonderful to “negative” words like bland and overrated to grade overall opinion.

However, our dataset was limited to the food terms we chose to rate against each other, rather than all food terms in internet existence. That being said, we plugged in terms we talk about a lot on Foodbeast:  ramenkalejuicingfrench presscroissant donutpoutinegrilled cheesesriracha, and kimchi. We let the fancy technology run the numbers from June 1, 2014 to June 30, 2014 and in the end, this is what we got:

food-trends-infographic

Foods with the most “Share of Voice,” aka the one’s being talked about the most:

Ramen-Burger

From highest to lowest:

1. Ramen

2. Kale

3. Grilled Cheese

4. Juicing

5. Kimchi

6. Poutine, Sriracha (Tied)

7. French Press

8. Cronut Croissant Donut

 _______

Foods with the highest “Sentiment,” aka the one’s with the most positve “feels”

cronut-dominique-ansel

From highest to lowest:

1. Juicing

2. Kale

3. Croissant Donut

4. Poutine, Ramen (Tied)

5. Kimchi

6. Sriracha

7. French Press

8. Grilled Cheese

_______

Note, while “Grilled Cheese” was one of the top foods being talked about, it’s sentiment was the lowest — the most negative — on the list. Which leads us to think… people must be mad hating on that cheesy, melty goodness.

Peek the infographic for more slick nuances and let us know what you discover in the comments.