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The Eleven Regional Hot Dogs Everyone Needs In Their Life

There aren’t many things on this green earth that unify, and simultaneously drive apart, Americans quite like hot dogs, besides maybe politics and the NFL (which may as well be the same thing at this point, much to the chagrin of “Stick to Sports” Twitter). Hot dogs are universal in the sense that they’re consumed at every corner of the country. They’re also quite divisive, in that each region has their own spin on the mystery sausage, and which one is the best is a oft-debated subject.

Cities and states lay claim to hot dogs like BBQ and famous nightclubs. The Chicago dog, Dodger dog, Seattle-style dog, Detroit dog — all delicacies that locals will fiercely defend to their graves.

In truth, most of these dogs are remarkably similar: dog, buns, onions, peppers, cheese, and some kind of sauce. The attachment lies in the intrinsic pride that comes with the down-home origin story of each dog, most of which were long ago enough to not be quite remembered, as well as memories of better days and sleepless nights spent with friends stumbling into a hot dog vendor at just the right time.

One such cherished hot dog is Detroit’s Coney Island dog, which combines a Dearborn Sausage Company hot dog with beanless chili, a hit of mustard, chopped raw onions, and, of course, a helping of shredded cheddar cheese. These dogs are a part of the city’s culinary backbone, a place where a preference between local landmark American Coney Island or it’s next-door counterpart Lafayette can strain friendships. 

A few days ago, on Foodbeast’s podcast, The Katchup, hosts Elie Ayrouth and Geoffrey Kutnick were joined by Chris Sotiropoulos, the owner of American Coney Island to discuss the creation of the Detroit’s esteemed Coney Island Dogs. The company’s recent expansion to Las Vegas gives West Coaster’s the chance to try a regional dog that would be otherwise unobtainable. With the Coney fresh on our mind, the Foodbeast office began to think of other specialty dogs out there that we haven’t tried. 

So, we hit the streets and found eleven hometown favorites that we wish we could try, and here they are:

Sonoran Style

 

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The Sonoran hot dog starts with a frank wrapped in crispy bacon. Created in Tucson, AZ, the dog pays homage to the city’s Latino roots by using a split soft roll called a bolillo, and topping that with pinto beans, chopped tomatoes, diced onions, creamy mayo, mustard, and jalapeños. 

Chicago Style

 

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Maybe one of the most famous options on this list, the Chicago-style dog is as much a staple to the city as its biting wind. It uses a steamed Vienna sausage all-beef dog, which is then placed in a steamed poppy seed bun, and painted with the bright colors of tomato slices, sport peppers, dill pickle, chopped raw onion, relish, celery salt, and a drizzle of bright yellow mustard.

Scrambled Dog

 

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The Scrambled Dog was born in Columbus, GA 72 years ago, the brainchild of the late Lieutenant Stevens. This beast of a plate starts with a soft bun, then Stevens’ fresh chili, cut up weiners, more chili, raw onions, dill pickle slices, and a heaping handful of crunchy oyster crackers. 

Seattle Style Dog

 

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A Seattle-style hot dog consists of a grilled, split frank, nestled on a toasted bun that’s been smothered in cream cheese, grilled onions and, often, jalapeños. It makes sense that these are typically eaten during late nights out, because it sounds like something I would make with some potluck leftovers at 2AM.

Tater Pig

 

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This… is what it sounds like. A specialty of the Twin Falls County Fair, this monstrosity does just enough to constitute as a hot dog. Really, it’s a sausage. And it’s stuffed inside of a baked potato. Hence, the tater pig. 

Polish Boy

 

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Cleveland’s late night sausage of choice is a grilled kielbasa (a sausage broadly described as “any type of meat sausage from Poland.” Thanks Wikipedia). Place one of these guys on a sturdy bun, and top it with a handful of fries, coleslaw, BBQ sauce, as well as hot sauce, and you have yourself a Polish Boy.

Dodger Dog

 

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Los Angeles’ Chavez Ravine favorite has both steamed and grilled variations. Either way, the result is a ten-inch pork hot dog embraced in an equally as long bun, marked with relish, mustard, ketchup, and chopped raw onions. 

Carolina Style

 

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This version of the hot dog is popular amongst much of the Southeast United States. Beginning with an all-beef frank stuffed in a soft bun, it’s then covered in chili and piled high with coleslaw. Most people like to add mustard as well, to offset the sweetness of the slaw and savoriness of the chili.

New York Dog

 

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Contrary to every other aspect of their lives, New Yorkers like to keep their hot dogs simple. Strictly boiled in water of mysterious circumstances on a street cart, these dogs are topped with only mustard and sauerkraut for buyers to quickly shove down.

Italian Dog

 

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The answer to every New Jerseyan’s hangover, this dog originated in Newark. Here, bakers make plush loaves of pizza bread, which are like massive pizza crusts. After being split open, the bread is stuffed with a lightly fried dog, onions, peppers, and more deep-fried potatoes than can fit.

Tijuana Dog

 

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The Tijuana dog, though named after the town in Mexico in which it originates, gained it’s fame off the streets of L.A. Sold largely from street carts outside of sports games and clubs, this dog is wrapped in bacon and fried until crispy and snappy. It’s tossed into a soft bun and then served with grilled onions and peppers, mayo, mustard, ketchup, and sometimes a grilled jalapeño to give it some kick.

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#foodbeast Adventures Food Trends Health Plant-Based Restaurants What's New

The Makers Of The Viral Watermelon Ham Have Created A New ‘Carrot Dog’

As a vegan I’ve tried many “alternative proteins,” some decent, others horrible. I can say that over the years things have definitely improved and will continue to. Alternative meat options most often come in the form of processed plant stuff: soy, seitan, tempeh and more recently, pea protein. Recently, vegans have definitely become very resourceful. For instance, I just tried a banana peel burger. Yes, a burger that was made from banana peels. When I first heard about it I thought it was a funny vegan joke. Turns out that when cooked, banana peels have a potato-like consistency. Sounds crazy right? Crazy delicious.

Speaking of crazy, this month plant-based brand by CHLOE. launched a CARROT dog in collaboration with Harry & Ida’s Meat & Supply Co. and Guinness World Record holder for competitive eating, Takeru Kobayashi. This dog is made entirely of carrot, New York-style, with no processed plant stuff. The carrot is hand-picked, cured, smoked AND aged for five days. Let that marinate.

Samantha Wasser, founder of by CHLOE., came up with the idea following the success of their smoked watermelon ham. The smoked watermelon ham was in collaboration with Ducks Eatery, another restaurant from Harry & Ida’s owners Will & Julie Horowitz. Wasser said:

“Our goal is to offer our guests clean, yet satisfying plant-based options without any artificial flavors or foreign ingredients, and the Carrot Dog aligns perfectly with our mission. I was completely blown away by Will & Julie’s creativity and knew we needed to work together to introduce The Carrot Dog to the world!”

Each carrot is hand-picked, “perfectly-sized” and cured with salt, pepper, garlic and oregano, then smoked over local oak and maple woods. Five days later, a “natural casing” is created in what mimics the look of a traditional dog. Finally, the carrot dog is grilled. Apparently the dog took 1.5 years and 100 tries of playing with smoked vegetables to get right. 

To give the launch an additional boost, by CHLOE. is teaming with competitive eating legend, six time Guinness World Record holder, Takeru Kobayashi. Kobayashi, who lives a mostly plant-based diet between competitions said:

“As a hot dog master, I’ve seen and tried many vegetarian hot dogs, and personally hadn’t found one that I enjoy until I tried by CHLOE.’s new Carrot Dog. The smoky taste of the carrot in the bun is something really unique and different, and I love that it’s made with only carrots and no processed ingredients.”

The Carrot Dog has been available at all stateside by CHLOE. locations since July 1st, and will be offered for $6.75.

Photos: Meredith Sidman
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Culture Humor Video

4th Of July Video Captures Food And Fireworks Exploding In Beautiful Slow-Motion

July 4th is nearly upon us and, while it’s locked in the middle of the workweek, it doesn’t mean we can’t get weird and fun with the national holiday.

You may remember director David Ma from his many food series such as Superhero Hands and Jeff’s Table.

As a tribute to Independence Day, the director celebrates July 4th in what he feels is the most “AMERICA way possible” — combining food and fireworks.

Watch as traditional 4th of July picnic foods like hot dogs, watermelon, and Jell-O explode to the National Anthem.

Ma told Foodbeast:

“This was a personal project and ode to my favorite 4th of July foods with fireworks I was never allowed to play with as a kid.”

The director revealed that the foods chosen were not only iconic to Independence Day picnics, but items that would also yield to beautiful explosions in slow motion.

“I had a small but brilliant team who made all this happen. Brett Long was our food stylist who worked in tandem with Mike Quattrocchi (our fireworks technician) to attach M80 and mortar fireworks to watermelons, potato salad, Jell-O molds and hot dogs for precision in our blasts. For the set decoration and propping, Chuck Willis and Melissa Stammer brought to life my vision for the tabletops, which was a kitschy Americana ’80s feel.”


Remember kids, DO NOT try this at home. As this behind-the-scenes pic shows, the explosions were very real.

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Grocery Video

Meat Expert Explains The Differences Between Quality And Cheap Deli Meats

By no means am I an expert on deli meat. I enjoy eating meat, and occasionally grilling up a hot dog or two, but my expertise is as limited as what I see in the butcher section of my Italian deli.

There’s always a nagging in the back of my head when I buy meat, whether or not it’s actually quality stuff or just older cuts the store is trying to get rid of to customers who don’t know any better.

Well, Epicurious brought in meat expert Eli Cairo to point out the different between cheap and expensive deli meats in a fascinating YouTube video.

The meats Cairo covered included salami, ham, bologna, hot dogs, and prosciutto. In the video, he talked about the things you should look for when purchasing those meats, such as colors, regulated labels, and marbling. Cairo was given two meats, and was tasked with deciphering which of the two was more expensive through the sense of sight, smell, and taste.

Pretty useful if you’re one who frequents a deli, or simply enjoys snacking on deli meats. Check out the video and perhaps you’ll be a little wiser on your next meat run.

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Cravings Restaurants

This Pigs In A Blanket Pizza Is The Perfect Thing To Devour For The Big Game

The Big Game is only a week away and you need to start thinking of all your game day menu options while cheering on your team.

Krave It Sandwich Shop & Eatery, created a pizza that may very well be the ultimate game day party food. It’s essentially a pigs in a blanket pizza and we’re not mad about it at all.

Called the Battle of the Pigskin (get it?), the pizza is topped with Chili con Carne, Fritos, scallions, white onions, bacon, hot dog slices, mozzarella cheese, cheddar cheese, Monterey jack cheese, and chipotle Sriracha mustard, all cooked on a pigs in a blanket crust.

Boy, how we’d love to wrap ourselves up inside this pie. Kind of wish there was a Krave It in California so I can order one for Royal Rumble this Sunday as well. Perhaps one day.

The Battle of the Pigskin is available now until the day of the Big Game at the Bayside, NY, restaurant. Any NYC readers feel like mailing us a slice?

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#foodbeast Alcohol Celebrity Grub Humor

Betty White Credits Her Long Life to Vodka and Hot Dogs

Happy Birthday, Betty White!

Okay, let’s be real. If Betty White is throwing a birthday party, I would like to get my hands on an invite. After all, the 96-year-old Golden Girl credits vodka and hot dogs to her long, healthy life. Can you imagine how much of a blast it’ll be? Vodka and hot dogs? And “lots and lots of it.”

Now that I’m a quarter century, my eyes have been lingering longer on the eye creams and wrinkle-reducing masks at Sephora. The number of supplements I take every day is kind of frightening. The truth is, while I may not be an OC Housewife, searching left and right for the next Fountain of Youth, I too dread getting older.

Well, according to White, a little bit of booze and processed meat is the key.

Okay, that doesn’t mean everyone needs to go hard on multiple bottles of Grey Goose daily, but she may be onto something.

A study indicates people who drink moderately were over 20% less likely to die early of any cause.

White also adds an optimistic mindset leads to happier life.

“Enjoy life. Accentuate the positive, not the negative. It sounds so trite, but a lot of people will pick out something to complain about, rather than say, ‘Hey, that was great!’ It’s not hard to find great stuff if you look.”

True that, sister! Cheers to the true queen and happy birthday!

Now, who wants to come to my barbecue party this weekend? I’ll get the vodka and hot dogs ready!

I taught Cam everything he knows. #SuperBowl #SB50

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Health News

7-Eleven Employee In Utah May Have Exposed Thousands Of Customers To Hepatitis

Customers of a 7-Eleven in Utah may want to pay close attention, ’cause those heat lamp pizza and chicken wings may have put them at risk for hepatitis.

According to health officials, a location of the national convenience retailer may have exposed about 2,000 customers to Hepatitis A, GrubStreet reports.

The Salt Lake County Health Department announced that customers who visited the 7-Eleven located on 2666 West 7800 South in West Jordan between Dec. 26 to Jan. 3 may want to consider getting a Hepatitis A shot after potential exposure occurred when an infected employee worked while ill.

Customers who consumed the store’s fresh fruit, self-served fountain drinks, hot items (hot dogs, pizza, chicken wings, or taquitos), or used the store’s bathroom, are said to be at risk. Those who ate and drank items sealed in packages shouldn’t worry though.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A include jaundice, nausea, fatigue, and fever, and could take up to a month to even show.

Since the discovery of the possible exposure, the location has been sanitized to the health department’s standards. Still, any customers of that specific Utah location may want to look into the injection. Those who are already fully vaccinated against Hep A should be alright.

It should also be stressed that anyone who handles food regularly should be washing their hands.

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#foodbeast Cravings Features FOODBEAST Restaurants SPONSORED Video

3 Del Amo Fashion Center Spots That Transcend ‘Mall Food’

Positioned less than four miles from the Redondo Beach Pier, the Del Amo Fashion Center is a newly-built, sprawling modern retail hub, featuring some of the most stunning contemporary architecture found in Southern California.

But what’s really drawing crowds to Del Amo, isn’t so much the storefronts — it’s the food.  

With a long list of culturally diverse eateries, Del Amo isn’t just a shopping mall, it’s becoming a dining experience that’s just as beautiful on Instagram as it is in person.   

Del Amo is home to Frida Mexican Cuisine, featuring traditional Mexican classics like the Molcajete Frida — a giant boiling bowl of slightly spicy salsa verde sauce, made with tomatillos onions and cilantro, served with nopales (grilled cactus), chicken, juicy carne asada, and a creamy queso panela.

While seamlessly blending fine dining experiences with shopping and casual eating, Del Amo food court’s avant garde vibe has welcomed vendors like Pink’s Hot Dog’s — one of the most famous restaurants in the history of Los Angeles.

We all know Pink’s has a menu perfectly suited for the hungry fashion center crowds. If you plan on making a pit stop, check out the Jaws Burger. A charbroiled chili cheese burger, served with a perfectly grilled spicy Polish sausage, topped with lettuce, tomato and onions.

With a seemingly endless list of retailers and restaurants, it might be hard to choose something. So, here’s a pro tip — hit up Brio Coastal Bar & Kitchen. While you’re there, be sure to order the Buffalo Cauliflower Steak. Sliced cauliflower, grilled, then drizzled with a tangy buffalo sauce and a spicy horseradish sauce.

These are just a few of the spots that make Del Amo Fashion Center our Chomping Grounds.

Where are yours?


Created in partnership with Del Amo Fashion Center