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Fast Food

Wingstop’s Lemon Pepper Just Got A Spicy Upgrade

If you’re a fan of Wingstop’s classic Lemon Pepper, you might be excited to know that they’ve added some spice to it.

Wingstop introduced a new Harissa Lemon Pepper flavor that’s covered in Harissa pepper paste and roasted bell peppers. You still get the dry-rub feel of the usual Lemon Pepper, just with an added kick.

Along with the Harissa Lemon Pepper, Wingstop also launched an Ancho Honey Glaze, which will be covered in a southern Mexican Ancho pepper, aged cayenne and drenched in a hot honey glaze.

The two new offerings will only be around through the summer and will disappear September 1, so if you want to give these two spicy wings a shot, you’ll have a few months to work with.

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#foodbeast Brand Cravings Features FOODBEAST Hit-Or-Miss Recipes SPONSORED

Open-Faced Mussel Sandwich Is The Seafood Dish You Must Try This Summer


In the digitally driven world of Instagram-able food, it’s hard to focus on the beauty and allure of fine dining. However, Tabañero Hot Sauce and FOODBEAST are working to eliminate that issue with this Open-Faced Mussel Sandwich as part of our The Tabasutra Series.

This strikingly beautiful and sophisticated seafood plate reimagines the classic restaurant dish, and also incorporates the elegance of one of the most recognized Tabasutra poses known to man — but we’ll get to that later.

Sautéed in a mixture of shallots, cumin seed, garlic, red bell pepper, and a red wine vinegar, and served on two thick slices of French bread, this sandwich will give any foodie an instant O-face.

That’s probably why “The Sommelier” was the perfect candidate for this exotic Tabasutra grip.

With 12-15 freshly cooked black mussels, a healthy helping of harissa paste for spice, this Tabañero mussel sandwich packs a spicy seafood punch you’ll only be able to recreate with the help of the Tabasutra Series recipe book.

So, what’s your favorite Tabasutra position?

Ingredients
For the harissa

3oz Tabañero hot sauce

1/2 cup red onion, minced

1/2 tsp caraway seed

1/2 tsp coriander seed

1/2 tsp cumin seed

4 cloves garlic minced

1 roasted red bell pepper

olive oil, as needed

3oz red wine vinegar

1 tbsp tomato paste

1 tbsp unsalted butter

For the mussels

2 thick slices of baguette or French bread

1/2 c chopped fennel

Fennel fronds for garnish

1/2 c heirloom cherry tomatoes

1 shallot, diced finely

1/2 c white wine

1 tbsp unsalted butter

12-15 fresh black mussels

Salt and pepper, to taste

1 tbsp vegetable oil

Harissa

Step 1

Toast all the dried seeds in a sauté pan on medium until fragrant, be careful not to burn. Roast Bell pepper on open flame until charred black, and then immediately put in bowl and wrap with plastic so it can steam off charred skin. When cool, peel skin under running water, de-seed and rough chop. Put dried seeds in a spice grinder or a mortar and pestle, grind, and reserve.

Step 2

In a sauté pan, add 1 tablespoon of butter and sauté garlic and onion till translucent. Add tomato paste and deglaze with red wine vinegar and reserve.

Step 3

In a food processor, combine the sautéed garlic, onion, and tomato paste. Mix with the dried spices, Tabañero hot sauce, and roasted bell peppers and pulse. Drizzle olive oil and season to taste until desired consistency and flavor is achieved.

Mussel sandwich

Step 4

In a medium sauté pan heat vegetable oil. Add in shallots and chopped fennel and sauté until translucent. Add in Mussels and harissa paste and deglaze with white wine. Cover the sauté pan and cook until mussels are completely open, approximately 2min.

Step 5

Mount with butter and season to taste to make sauce. Toast bread and spread sauce on bread, pick mussels out of shell and build open faced sandwich. Garnish with sliced heirloom tomatoes and fennel fronds. Assemble like an avocado toast.

Photos by Peter Pham


Created in partnership with Tabañero 

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Hit-Or-Miss Tastemade/Snapchat

10 Of The Most Loved Condiments Around The World

 

Whether you’re the kind of person who squirts ketchup all over their fries or dips them (or maybe you prefer mayo or aioli), chances are you’re not omitting the condiment altogether. Spreads and sauces make our meals complete, so take a gander at what everyone else in the world is frantically scooping out of jars.

Harissa

Tunisia/North Africa

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Photo: Delicious

When the Spanish brought chili peppers into 16th century Tunisia, they couldn’t have possibly known they were becoming a part of condiment history. Though the taste evolves as you move through North Africa, this chili paste always has an undeniable kick and consistency. It also serves as the primary flavor within merguez, a North African lamb sausage. With flavor you want to take home to your mother, harissa is a staple at any meal.

 

Wasabi

Japan

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Photo: Mother Nature Network

Dating back to the 10th century, the wasabi plant has spiced up Japanese cuisine. The plant requires cold, freshwater with a balance of minerals in order to thrive, making its production very rare. Wasabi’s growing popularity beyond Japan brought about many alternative condiments which are primarily made of horseradish and green food dye. Authentic wasabi spoils within 15 minutes of preparation which led to the tradition of serving it beneath sushi, in order to preserve its flavor.

 

Mayonnaise

The United States

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Photo: Reference

For many years, ketchup was the head honcho in the U.S. Over the past couple of years, however, Americans declared that mayo was the new sheriff in town. Whether due to a surge in deviled egg popularity or homemade sandwiches, mayonnaise spread throughout the country at an unusually high rate, beginning in 2013. The eggy sauce has its roots in France or Spain, depending on who you ask, but no one can find more uses for it than a Yankee.

 

Banana Sauce

The Philippines

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Photo: The Actor’s Diet

When the United States began influencing the Philippines in the mid-20th century, ketchup caught on quickly throughout the nation. During World War II, a tomato ketchup was a rare sight. Since tomatoes were scarce across the islands, banana sauce aka banana ketchup was invented. Often dyed red to mimic the look of traditional ketchup, banana sauce’s sweetness easily sets it apart from tomato ketchup while still sharing many of its uses.

 

Vegemite

Australia

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Photo: Mashable

The Brits initially had the stranglehold on this substance in a less salty spread called Marmite. In 1923, however, Cyril Callister recreated the recipe from scratch, with more sodium and Vitamin B. The sticky breakfast condiment made from brewer’s yeast cemented itself as uniquely Australian when it became a part of army rations during World War II. In 2015, Aussies started using Vegemite to create alcohol, prompting calls from the government to limit its sale. For some, a law probably isn’t necessary.

 

Ajvar

Serbia

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Photo: Cooking the Globe

This so-called “Serbian Salsa” is served throughout the Balkan nations as a relish or a side dish. Though, like the nations it’s made in, ajvar’s name changes every so often, the red pepper paste is always dependable. Spread on a hot meat dish or as a cold appetizer, ajvar will prove to your tastebuds that it can wear many hats.

 

Chutney

India

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Photo: RecipesHubs

For thousands of years, chutney has been an irreplaceable relish that sweetens or spices, depending on how its made. Ancient holy men, Brahmins, discovered the preservative powers of spices and began to mix them with various fruits and vegetables. The British would eventually carry sweet chutneys to the U.K. as well as its African and Caribbean territories, but Indian chutneys remain complex in taste and texture.

 

Hoisin Sauce

China

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Photo: Soap

Not to be confused with Vietnamese sriracha, hoisin sauce lends a tangy glaze to any dish. Essentially a Chinese (specifically Cantonese) barbeque sauce, this condiment lies at the intersection of a brown sauce and hot sauce. In fact, Peking ducks would feel underdressed without their healthy coat of hoisin sauce.

 

Salsa

Mexico/South America

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Photo: Whats4Eats

As early as 3000 BC, the Aztecs mixed chilis with tomatillos. Over the millennia that followed, the recipes got only slightly more complicated and the Conquistadors eventually named this mixture “salsa.” The precursor to many modern hot sauces in the Americas, salsa’s versatility in heat and consistency has given it a wide appeal.

 

Brown Sauce

The United Kingdom/Ireland

hp-sauce

Photo: The Spectator

The popular brand may be HP, but brown sauce by any other name would be as delicious to serve with some fish and chips. Brown sauces can be sweet or tart, but mostly resemble American steak sauces. With a variety of uses in many savory dishes, it’s no wonder you’ll likely find a bottle in any British home.