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Hit-Or-Miss

9 Everyday Foods That Could Kill Your Cat

Owning a pet of any kind brings joy, companionship and most of all — responsibility. So, even if you’re experienced with animals, it’s your job to make sure your felines are healthy and happy. One of the easiest ways to monitor your pet’s well-being is closely monitoring a diet that’s toxin-free in order to keep your furry roommate’s tummy out of harm’s way.

If you’re one of the 85.8 million people that own a cat, then you know it’s not often you have to watch everything that goes into it’s mouth, since cats are generally very fussy eaters. While our claw-equipped fur pillows might express some curiosity every time you make a tuna sandwich — that doesn’t mean you should feel inclined to make two.

With that said, here’s a few of the most common human foods that could actually be fatal to felines. So, take note to ensure that culinary curiosity doesn’t kill your cat.

1. Tuna & Poke

What can it do?

Although poke maybe be delicious, it’s not the best treat for your cat.

Actually, in excess tuna — and other fish—  in general is considered to be borderline unhealthy for cats because tuna doesn’t contain the nutrients cats need for a healthy digestive system.

Too much tuna for cats can lead to malnutrition. Additionally, poke is usually made with freshly squeezed lemon or citrus juice, which can cause vomiting, stomach irritation, and other digestive issues for our feline companions.

2. Fish & Poultry With Bones

What can it do?

Be careful if you feed your cats chicken or fish that might contain bones, as cats can easily choke on them. Fish bones are somewhat flexible, and can easily be consumed by a hungry kitty.

But let’s err on the side of caution here.

3. Alcohol

What can it do?

One teaspoon of alcohol can put a five pound cat into a coma, according to the ASPCA. Cat livers don’t operate as efficiently as the human liver  — which means wine, beer or spirits can cause serious health problems.

So, even if you and your cat are relaxing after a hard day at work, and you feel inclined to pour a little of alcohol into his or her bowl —  don’t.

However, if you feel like your cat just needs to, “wine” about their day of sleeping and watching birds, this cat wine will provide a healthy alternative.

 

4. Caffeine

@tania_crystal0126 (instagram)

What can it do?

Even small amounts of caffeine can cause rapid breathing, heart palpitations, and muscle tremors in cats.

Caffeine can be found in an array of products — even decaf coffee, teas, and other beverages — without consumer knowledge.

Since caffeine isn’t a nutrient, the Food and Drug Administration doesn’t require food manufacturers to list caffeine as food nutrition labels.

5. Chocolate

What can it do?

While dogs are more likely to get into a stash of indulgent chocolate before a cat does, it’s still a good idea to keep it out of kitty’s reach.

Theobromine is an alkaloid found in chocolate, which can cause everything from vomiting and diarrhea.

It’s estimated that more than 200 mg of theobromine can also cause cardiac failure.

 

6. Grapes & Raisins

@bordeauxwinelovers (instagram)

What can it do?

While grapes and raisins might seem like harmless treats for your cat, it’s a silent killer.

However, it’s unknown exactly what compound in grapes and raisins that make the fruit toxic to cats. If ingested, grapes have been known to cause kidney failure in them.

7. Candy, Gum, Toothpaste, or anything with Xylitol

What can it do?

Every diet soda you drink contains Xylitol, which is a sugar alcohol used as a sweetener in a lot of common foods. However, it will be anything but sweet to your inquisitive cat.

Xylitol can increase in the insulin circulating through your cat’s body, which will cause the cat’s blood sugar to drop, and can also lead to liver failure.

8. Baking Dough

What can it do?

Imagine your cat’s tummy as a tiny oven — if it eats uncooked dough, it will begin to expand inside.

This will obviously result in some discomfort to your four-legged friend, so be sure to keep baking dough out of kitty’s claws and jaws.

9. Raw Meat

What can it do?

Raw meat is never safe to eat due to the harmful bacteria, like salmonella, E. Coli and even listeria — which can cause an array of health issues for humans and their pets.

Always make sure your meat is covered and out of reach, you never know when kitty will hop up on the kitchen counter to investigate.

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#foodbeast Recipes

Sour Patch Kid Grapes Are The Crazy Hybrid Snack You Need Right Now

We’ve published numerous homemade recipe videos recreating our favorite name brand foods right in the comfort of our own kitchen. However, Sour Patch Kids grapes are by far the easiest.

Made by using water and a few different flavors of Jell-O or other gelatin powder, our re-work of this snack can transform a bunch of ordinary grapes into some naturally sweet and simple Sour Patch Kids flavored grapes.

All you need to do is grab a toothpick, dip a grape in water, then roll it, dunk it, or coat it in your choice of Jell-O mix. This process is very safe, quick and affordable. Not to mention, the final product is absolutely delicious.

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Hit-Or-Miss

Meet Juan Muñoz-Oca: A Washington Winemaker Taking Pretension Out Of Wine

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A few months ago, I briefly escaped the hellfire known as September in Southern California to wander through vineyards in Eastern Washington. Yup, there are vineyards in Eastern Washington. I didn’t believe it myself, but a couple of trips on tiny airplanes later, I found myself in what was, unmistakably, wine country.

I won’t bury a disclosure at the bottom of this piece: I definitely did not find myself in Paterson, Washington on my own dime. I stepped off the plane, slightly convinced that I was tricked into visiting San Luis Obispo, with my skeptical New Yorker/journalistic eyes and ears.

But I swooned for Columbia Crest Winery anyway. In less than two days, Juan Muñoz-Oca sold me on Washington vineyards, the de-bouge-ification of wine, and crowdsourced winemaking.

A Family Of Winemakers/A Winemaker Family

This is a grown man with the style of 25-year-old model (who pulls it off much better than Johnny Depp could ever hope to) and the built-in charisma of an Argentinian. More importantly, this is a man who gets swept up in day-long coffee meetings and will stick his fashionable arm into a crate of fermenting grapes, with little regard for his watch, simply because he’s so giddy to explain the winemaking process to you.

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In less than two days, Juan Muñoz-Oca sold me on Washington vineyards, the de-bouge-ification of wine, and crowdsourced winemaking.

His infectious, childlike wonder surrounding wine stems from a family legacy. At the tender age of eight, Muñoz-Oca began learning about wine from his grandfather in Mendoza, Argentina. He went on to study winemaking and agricultural engineering at Argentina’s National University of Cuyo, securing that a third generation of Muñoz-Oca would get into the family business. Several degrees and the successful wooing of viticulturist-turned-winemaker Jessica Munnell later, he joined the Columbia Crest family.

Before being named head winemaker in 2011, Muñoz-Oca spent 8 years (plus an internship in 2001) helping a close-knit team continue to raise the winery’s bar of excellence.

“I felt something really special my first visit to Washington,” gushed Muñoz-Oca. “I’ve been lucky to make wine with a group like this. It feels like we’re doing something very unique.”

Washington Wine: A Force To Be Reckoned With

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In a crowning moment, Wine Spectator bestowed the title “Wine of the Year” on Columbia Crest’s 2005 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon. With a $27 price tag, it tied as the second most affordable wines in the top 25. The winery’s more economic H3 bottles clock in around $10, and also often appear on Wine Spectator’s annual list.

Yes, you can get high quality wine for (often less than) $10 that was made in Eastern Washington, sans grunge and never-ending rain. Largely, we have the late Dr. Walter Clore, the man who literally wrote the book on Washington wine, to thank for this miracle. Officially recognized by the state as the “Father of Washington Wine,” Clore’s research unearthed the Columbia Valley’s prime grape-growing conditions, giving birth to numerous wineries.

You can get high quality, Eastern Washington wine for $10.

And yet, most conversations about wine pit California against France while countries like Chile, Argentina, and Thailand have only started making headlines for their grapes in recent years. In a climate like this, it’s not unusual for you to be hearing about Washington wineries for the first time, but rest assured that they want to make a good first impression.

“Every time someone picks up a bottle of Columbia Crest, they’re betting on us and on having a great experience.” said Muñoz-Oca. “I feel like we have the responsibility to deliver wonderful experiences to everybody who drinks it.”

Putting The Grapes In The Computers Of The People

During a retreat, the Columbia Crest team mulled it over and decided to open up the winemaking process to the public, making them the first winery to do so. In 2014, they set aside five acres of the vineyard (which previously yielded their Wine of the Year) and let users vote on various processes throughout the season, from when they should harvest the grapes to how they should blend the wine. According to Muñoz-Oca, so far, the crowd always gets it right.

When I first checked out the 2015 harvest on the Crowdsourced Cabernet website, I thought it would be very limited in scope. Instead, I found myself feeling as though someone playing Fallout 4 had just handed me the controller (even my button-smashing is horrendous).

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‘It feels like we are in an era where we care more about the process of how things are made,’ said Muñoz-Oca.

Don’t get me wrong; the questions were written in plain English, but the in-depth weather stats coupled with the vineyard and barrel room live feeds gave me an unexpected power rush. The cherry on top? The website is actually gorgeous. No, I’m not talking about the standard sleek aesthetics of an alcohol brand’s website; this site is fast, responsive, and makes you want to use it.

And people are. From the 2014 to the 2015 season, the site experienced a 788 percent bump in traffic and a 255 percent increase in votes. Though Crowdsourced Cabernet has an international reach, the vast majority of users winemakers reside in the US, and are fairly evenly dispersed throughout the states. With millennials making up roughly half of the group, Columbia Crest’s ability to tap into the needs of a youthful base is impressive and organic, but not at all surprising.

“It feels like we are in an era where we care more about the process of how things are made,” said Muñoz-Oca before remarking on his fascination with how his jeans are made. “Bringing people into the handcrafted grape-growing and winemaking… allows us to show where we are and what we do.”

This almost instantaneous sense of a familial community combined with a shared curiosity regarding the outcome accomplishes a very peculiar feat. Columbia Crest draws in people from different walks of life and asks them to create something together, in an age of increasing social disconnect. Not only is this product tangible, but it’s associated with joviality and festivities.

You get the sense that Columbia Crest was on the right path, but probably couldn’t get to this place where modernism mixes with traditional elbow grease without Muñoz-Oca (though he’ll likely deflect praise onto his team).

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Whether it’s he’s talking about his vineyard family or taking his family to California vineyards, Muñoz-Oca doesn’t ooze the slimy pretentiousness you expect from someone with a title like head winemaker. It’s my sincerest belief that he could survive off of coffee, Washington wine, and good conversation. Isn’t this the kind of tunnel-vision passion you want behind your wine:

“It’s beyond what we do for a living,” he said of his and his wife’s careers. “It feels like it’s who we are, and some of that’s gotta transfer to our kids.”

Though he wouldn’t force his children into the family business, after watching a video of his six-year-old son discerningly taste grapes off the vine, I hope that this legacy will prevail. The world needs more Muñoz-Ocas sticking their hands into crates of grapes.

Photos: J. Fergus; Screenshot courtesy of Lurzer’s Archiv

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Hit-Or-Miss

A Bunch of Grapes Sell for $5,400 – That’s $180 Per Grape

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As a wedding present, a Japanese couple was given a gift of grapes worth $5,400. No, it wasn’t a truckload of grapes. Rather, the couple received 30 Ruby Roman grapes, according to Fox News.

Ruby Roman grapes are the most expensive grapesyou can get, going for about $180 per each individual grape. They’re sold only in Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan, and are roughly the size of ping pong balls each. The grapes undergo strict requirements before they can be sold. This includes weight, sugar content, and quantity per bunch. They will even miss going to market for an entire year if they are not up to those standards.

The grapes are a symbol of good luck in Japan. As a gift for the newlywed couple, a wedding hall owner purchased the set in an auction. He then told the two to savor the grapes’ sweet and fresh taste and enjoy the memories they brought.

Sure beats getting a toaster.

Picthx Amazing and Weird

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Features

12 Human Foods You Didn’t Know Could Kill Your Dog

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The most important thing with pet care is knowing what you can and can’t feed your dog. That and capitalizing on your puppy for hilarious memes. As long as you stick to a pretty decent doggy diet, everything should be gravy right? Wrong. Turns out there’s a ton of foods you probably didn’t know about that can actually be really bad for your dog, including some that are perfectly healthy for humans.

After all, there’s nothing worse than having your dog suffer over a simple mistake in diet. While they’re still man’s best friend, they probably shouldn’t eat like your best friend. Because we at Foodbeast care about you and your canine companions, here are 12 human foods that your dog should most definitely avoid.

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Chocolate

Chocolate

Chocolate is one of the most common foods that is bad for dogs, so we figured we’d knock it off the list early. Dog owners know better than to leave a Toblerone or two laying around.

What’s In It:

Chocolate contains caffeine and theobromine which fall under the methylxanthines category. When we hear the phrase “the darker the chocolate, the more dangerous,” it’s because white chocolates contain fewer methylxanthines. Thus, less toxicity.

What It Can Do:

If eaten by a dog, chocolate can cause vomiting, dehydration, abdominal pains, severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, elevated body temperature, seizures and death.

H/T ASPCA

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Milk

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Yeah we know, puppies drink milk from their mothers after they’re born. However, like humans  (including moi), dogs can also suffer from lactose intolerance.

What’s In It:

Milk contains milk sugar that dogs don’t have the enzymes to break down.

What It Can Do:

Consumption of milk could lead to vomiting, diarrhea and other gastrointestinal problems. While it’s not immediately life-threatening, it can contribute to serious bacterial exposure in dogs that could eventually lead to disease.

H/T Can I Give My Dog

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Cheese

Nachos

Sorry boy, no Grilled Cheese Spot for you. Your stomach will thank me for it later.

What’s In It:

Like milk, cheese also has sugars and fatty components that dogs don’t have the necessary enzymes to break down.

What It Can Do:

Cheese, and other dairy products, can cause problems if consumed in excess. Symptoms like gas, diarrhea and vomiting can all occur if a dog eats too much cheese.

H/T Dog Food Advisor

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Onion

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While onions go with pretty much anything savory, they can do more than just make your dog cry.

What’s In It:

Onions contain compounds that can be harmful to dogs if ingested enough.

What It Can Do:

Onions can damage red blood cells in dogs causing them to become weaker and move around less. If enough onions are consumed, a blood transfusion might be necessary.

H/T No Longer Wild

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Macadamia Nuts

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One of the more recent discoveries, Macadamia Nuts can be incredibly harmful to dogs if eaten.

What’s In It:

The specific chemicals found in macadamias are still unknown right now, but they are known to cause a toxic reaction to dogs if ingested.

What It Can Do:

Dogs will develop weakness and an inability to walk, specifically in their hind legs. Vomiting, staggering gait, depression, tremors and hypothermia.

H/T VetMedicine

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Garlic

Garlic

Consider your dogs vampires and keep them away from raw garlic as much as possible.

What’s In It:

Like the chocolate rule, the stronger the onion the more toxic it can be. Since garlic is part of the onion family it’s even more dangerous to dogs than onions per ounce. Garlic contains compounds that are strong in toxicity.

What It Can Do:

While the effect of garlic consumption to red blood cells won’t appear for a few days in dogs, they’ll be tired and reluctant to move. The dog’s urine will be orange to dark red in color. Like with onions, a blood transfusion might be required in severe cases.

H/T ASPCA

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Grapes

Grapes

Like Macadamia Nuts, grapes and raisins can be extremely toxic to dogs.

What’s In It:

While its currently unknown what chemicals and compounds are in grapes that cause toxicity to dogs, the results of consumption can be pretty devastating.

What It Can Do:

Grapes and raisins can cause rapid kidney failure. While it varies between dogs, symptoms may not show up in them. Other than kidney failure, dogs can also develop vomiting or diarrhea as well as a lethargic state. Dogs will also develop dehydration and lack of appetite. Death from kidney failure may occur within three to four days.

H/T ASPCA

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Avocados

Slices of Avocado

You might want to hold off sharing that guac with your doggy pal. He’ll thank you for it later.

What’s In It:

Avocado leaves, pits, bark and fruit contain a toxin called persin.

What It Can Do:

Avocados can have toxic effects on dogs depending on the variety. They can cause upset stomachs in dogs, breathing difficulties, fluid buildup in the chest, but the most dangerous thing for them seem to the be the pit. Since it’s slippery, the pit can accidentally be swallowed by dogs, leading to obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract.

H/T HubPages

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Apple Cores

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While most people try to avoid eating the core of an apple, it’s actually much more toxic to dogs. Along with a few other fruits, you should definitely be careful not to leave apple cores laying around for dogs to get their paws on.

What’s In It:

The core of an apple (as well as plums, peaches, pears and apricots) contain cyanogenic glycosides which is also known as cyanide.

What It Can Do:

Some of the symptoms that come from ingesting the toxin are dizziness, struggling to breath, seizures, collapsing, hyperventilation, shock and even coma.

H/T HubPages

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Yeast Dough

Bread

Bread makes you fat? While having a chubby puppy isn’t the worst thing in the world, yeast dough used to make bread should absolutely be kept away from dogs.

What’s In It:

The raw yeast dough from making bread can ferment in a dog’s stomach, becoming toxic.

What It Can Do:

Aside from the toxicity from alcohol being produced in the stomach, yeast dough can also expand in your dog’s stomach or intestines and create a large amount of gas in the digestive system. This can lead to severe pain and a potentially ruptured stomach or intestinal tract. Vomiting, abdominal discomfort and lethargy can also occur.

H/T VetMedicine

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Caffeine

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No idea who would ever share coffee with a dog. I mean, what do they have to do all day other than sleep and look out the window?  In all seriousness, owners should never let their dogs near coffee or any form of caffeine.

What’s In It:

Coffee contains a stimulant known as Methylated xanthine.

What It Can Do:

Methylated xanthine stimulates the nervous system in dogs, causing vomiting, restlessness, heart palpitations and even death.

H/T Can I Give My Dog

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Bacon

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What? Bacon?! Say it isn’t so! It’s absolutely tragic that we can’t share one of the greatest foods out there with our canine buddies. We’ll need to remember this the next time we want to feed our dogs some breakfast bacon under the table. Well, more bacon for us then. Sorry, buddy.

What’s In It:

Foods rich in fat, like bacon, can lead to the disease pancreatitis in dogs. Once a dog has developed pancreatitis, their pancreas’ become inflamed and stop functioning correctly.

What It Can Do:

This leads to all sorts of problems with digestion and nutrient absorption.

H/T Can I Give My Dog

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It should also be noted that the amount of damage these foods can do vary on the specific breeds and sizes of your dogs. Like humans, all dogs are different and can react differently to foods. Though it’s better to keep them away from these foods just for good measure.

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#foodbeast

Friends Don’t Let Friends Eat Grapes With Seeds

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Via Cuddles and Rage

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Video

Monkey Caught Eating Grapes

Homeboy got caught red handed and still got away with it! I need to learn the ways of the monkey!

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Celebrity Grub

Celeb Grub: Chelsea Handler Eating Grapes in Bed

This is Chelsea Handler. She hosts the Chelsea Lately show, and to be honest, one of the most funny women in comedy in my opinion. She’s also sexy. Sexy in a mom-next-door-who-doesn’t-give-a-shit type of way. Here she is in bed, eating green grapes. I love it.