Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

This Shake-Resistant, Smart Spoon Is Completely Spill-Proof

In a world dominated by smart phones, smart watches and smart cars, it seems there are countless inventions being created to help make life easier. Still, even the most impressive smart technology can become inaccessible to those with limited physical mobility.

For people living with a physical disability, whether it be a spinal cord injury, stroke, Huntington’s disease, or even mild to severe hand tremors, basic everyday tasks, such as eating, can be very difficult. That’s why Verily Life Sciences is working to bring smart technology for those who need it most, in the form of kitchen utensils.

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In 2013, Verily Life Sciences introduced the Liftware Steady (pictured left), a computerized handle, with basic utensil attachments, that contains sensors programmed to detect hand motion and stabilize unwanted tremors from the intended movement of the hand. This type of stabilization technology was designed to ease the frustration people living with tremors, and enable them to focus on their meal.

The company’s newest product, The Liftware Level (pictured right), is a self-leveling handle which contains sensors that detect changes from the intended movement of the hand.

The Liftware Level includes a spoon and fork attachments designed to give individuals living with limited arm and hand movement the ability to hold a utensil — at any angle —  and easily feed themselves.

Most importantly, both Liftware products are designed to allow people to regain confidence and focus on the most important parts of every meal — the food, and the people.

Inventions of this magnitude should be considered a breakthrough for those struggling with physical limitations. The Liftware Level is the world’s first spill-proof smart utensil that analyzes a users hand and arm position, and counteracts the effects of hand tremors and other involuntary movements.

Introduced to the public on Dec. 1, 2016, The Liftware Level Starter Kit is now available for $195 on its website, and is expected to ship before the holidays.

In recognition of such a important step forward in assisting individuals with physical limitations,  the Huntington Disease Society of America is donating 1,000 Liftware Level Starter Kits via its website, to those that apply.

This program is only is only intended for those affected by Huntington’s disease. Donations will be granted on a first come, first served basis.

Categories
Fast Food Hit-Or-Miss Products What's New

Behold The CHORK, Panda Express’ Combo Fork + Chopsticks

A couple weeks ago, Panda Express started hyping up these new Chorks. The plastic utensil features a fork on one end with a pair of chopsticks on the other.

Like the wooden chopsticks found in most Asian restaurants, you can snap the Chork in half and they’ll act as traditional chopsticks. If you’re unfamiliar with how to use chopsticks, leaving them connected lets you train with them.

We got our hands on some and decided to test them out for ourselves.

Check out the video to see what fellow Foodbeasts Marc and Elie had to say about them.

Panda Express currently has no plans to roll the utensils out nationally, at least for now. Rather, they’ll be giving them away on special occasions. If you’re dying to try them, you can buy some directly from Chork.

Categories
Fast Food Restaurants What's New

Panda Express Combined Forks With Chopsticks And It Looks Ridiculous

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Panda Express is reportedly making an intriguing choice of cutlery which may soon revolutionize how Chinese food is eaten in the U.S.

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In a recent tweet by Nation’s Restaurant News West Coast bureau chief Lisa Jennings, Panda Express is revealed to be adopting a plastic chopsticks/fork hybrid utensil called the “chork”.

The chork is a disposable plastic tool that has fork prongs on one end and two chopstick ends on the other. While it is designed in a way that the adjoining sticks can be pinched together to grasp food without needing to be separated, one simply needs to snap the sticks apart for the full chopstick experience. The brilliant yet weird looking tool will finally be making its mainstream debut if the popular restaurant chooses to adopt it.

Introduced in 2012, the chork was deemed by many as the future of eating but somehow failed to catch on. Creator Jordan Brown had the inspiration for nifty plastic utensil when, during a sushi dinner, he found himself grabbing a fork while eating with chopsticks.

Brown immediately began working on a prototype through his company Brown Innovation Group Incorporated (B.I.G.) in Salt Lake City, where he is a partner at the concept development and marketing. The resulting product was a promising new piece of innovation that many found very useful.

Testimonials on the Chork website showered it with some praises.

“That’s great, now my husband can use chopsticks with me and still be able to poke at the hard to pickup scraps,” said one happy user.  Another said: “Yay! I don’t have to fumble with chopsticks or ask for a fork!”

Written by Ryan General || NextShark

Categories
Humor Video

This Confused Toddler Can’t Find The Fork He’s Firmly Gripping

We’ve all been caught in that familiar whirlwind of confusion before, where you spin around in circles looking for that Hot Pocket you had in your hand a second ago when you got up to get some water, but now you have no idea where it is, so you call your sister a fat thief and threaten to tell your parents that she broke their favorite vase when she had her stupid Bachelor viewing party with her equally stupid but hot friends. Or something like that.

One especially confused kid struggled to find the fork planted firmly in his macaroni-stabbing hand. Thanks to the aid of his helpful brother and the snicker-laced guidance of his mother, this little Christopher Columbus finally found what he had been looking for this whole time.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

History Says That Fork In Your Hand Actually Has Some Devilish Beginnings

AKA the Devil’s tool

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Weird thought of the day: people ate with their hands for the majority of human history. Alexander the Great, Louis XIV, and Queen Elizabeth I all would have sat down to formal dinners at tables full of aristocrats and dignitaries of the highest order, and everyone would have just shoveled it in with their bear paws.

And while eating utensils in general weren’t always super popular or accessible, it’s forks specifically that didn’t gain acceptance or popularity until the last few centuries. Many in the Middle Ages thought the three-pronged utensil was reminiscent of the Devil’s pitchfork and thus was an unholy and ungodly instrument. According to Eduardo Galeano’s Mirrors, “every time musician Claudio Monteverdi felt obliged to use a fork, he purchased three masses to pay for his sins.”

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Bronze forks made of iron during the 8th or 9th century, via Wikipedia

The fork didn’t really begin to catch on—at least among the aristocracy—until the 18th century in France, with several other cultures beginning to use them at least for the sake of appearances. Recounting a dinner party he attended in Turkey, a French military officer noted that, “I saw one woman throughout the dinner taking olives with her fingers and then impaling them on her fork in order to eat in them in the French manner.”

Forks became a more or less commonly-used item in Europe by the 19th century, especially with the rise of a growing middle-class who strove to emulate the aristocracy in all manners and customs. However, they still sometimes had a vaguely off-putting and “feminine aura,” with reports of sailors refusing to use them as late as 1897.

Written by: Toria Sheffield // Historybuff.com // Feature image via Wikimedia

Categories
Restaurants

This Whimsical Restaurant Serves You Tuna with a Samurai Sword and Cotton Candy Wigs

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Initially, you might assume that Barton G. The Restaurant is all about gimmicks. I mean, it’s restaurant that serves you a filet mignon with a 3-foot fork and popcorn shrimp out of a popcorn machine? We were recently invited to check out the LA opening of Barton G., which until now, was a restaurant only exclusive to the great state of Florida.

Barton G. was known for their theatricality. If you ordered their Samurai Tuna dish, you’d get a dish served with a real samurai sword (though it’s frowned upon to unsheathe it and use it to cut said tuna). Upon first impressions, we thought to ourselves: “Hey this is kind of gimmicky. Cool, but gimmicky.” It couldn’t be further from the truth.

While each dish has a signature prop to accompany it, the food more than made up for the cheese (so to speak). We’ve tried some of the most flavorful dishes we’ve had in a really long time. Honestly, without all the crazy showmanship Barton G. could stand on its own against some of the best restaurants in the LA area.

Then again, you’re probably skimming this, anxious to get to the food porn. Well here it is you gluttonous bastards.

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 Bread

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Served right out of a tray via waiter, each piece of bread is shaped and designed as if it were a donut. However, they feature savory flavors like truffle and aged cheese.

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Lobster Pop Tarts

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Commuting from Orange County to LA can be rough. Especially on a weekday workday. That being said, our eyes immediately glazed over to the Lobster Pop-Tarts. Served out of a faux toaster, the pop tarts were flaky and moist like a pastry sent from heaven. They broke open to reveal a hefty helping of lobster meat swimming in a creamy gruyere sauce.

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The Upper Crustacean

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As children, we’ve all dreamed about owning a personal popcorn machine for our bedrooms the day we moved out of our parents’ house. No? Just us? As we got older, the idea seemed more and more unnecessary and impractical. However, if that dream popcorn machine was to produce crispy popcorn shrimp and lobster with a variety of dipping sauces, then that’s a different story.

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Samurai Tuna

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We had to be careful not to gorge ourselves on the appetizers, delicious as they might be. We were only a third into the tasting, after all. First of the entrees was the Samurai Tuna. A thick, seared tuna patty served rare with a savory rice cracker crust and topped with a roasted Shishito Pepper. It also came with mandarin-laced soba noodles and a Yuzu-Pomegranite sauce.

Oh, did we mention the bad-ass katana that came with the meal?

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The Great American Filet

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Final entree of the night was this behemoth of a filet mignon. Served with braised short rib, bone marrow and roasted snow peas and carrots and whipped potatoes the entire dish was shadowed by the giant that was attached to the serving board. If this is what it feels like to kings, then kings we were that night.

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Marie Antoinette

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Finally, once we loosened a few notches on our belts, we got ready for dessert. The Marie Antoinette was a wig made out of cotton candy and served with an array of strawberry shortcakes. Interestingly enough, Marie’s hairstyle would change frequently much like the historical figure. Unfortunately, if you’re thinking of removing the wig and placing upon your own head, note that it’s not only advised against, but it’s also attached to the mannequin with a caramel coating.

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Like that stopped us.

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To sum it up, Barton G. exceeded our initial impressions by a huge margin. Not only was their food entertaining gawk at, but they also backed it up with amazing flavors that blew us away. Any self-proclaimed foodie in the Miami or Los Angeles areas should make a note to experience this place at least once.

So to slightly modify a popular quote from a very wise person:

Giant forks. Samurai Swords. A foodie craves not these things.

Though it is an added bonus.

 —–

Florida

1427 West Ave.

Miami Beach, FL 33139

Los Angeles

861 N. La Cienega Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90069

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Picnic Backpack Guarantees First Date Success

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Ladies and gentlemen, it’s about damn time we stepped our first date game up. Dinner at your go-to Italian restaurant isn’t going to make her swoon and watching Fast and the Furious 273 isn’t going to make him tumble head over heels.

No, it’s time to take things to the next level with the Picnic Backpack.

The canvas pack comes decked out with plates, goblets, utensils, cloth napkins, and a cozy blanket for you and your date to cuddle under. There’s a detachable wine cooler on the side for pinot noir or some bubbly, plus a large insulated compartment to keep your food cool.

Of course, the impressive part comes in the attention to detail, as the backpack also includes salt and pepper shakers, a wooden cutting board and a corkscrew (which you know how elusive those can be).

So, next time you’re trying to impress, invite your date to a modern-day picnic. Break out the wine and cheese plates, then follow it up with a steak dinner while soaking in Mother Nature. Might as well do it proper the first time around.

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As you can see, we got ours personalized. Swag.

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Picnic Backpack, $80 @Red Envelope

Categories
Products

Spaghetti Fork, because Kids Have First World Problems Too

Spaghetti Fork

You know what stinks? When you’re ready to down a heaping bowl of spaghetti and it’s near impossible to slurp up the stuff with just a fork. Ugh, say it ain’t so! Well we have a reason to fret no more carb fans, because the Rolognese Spaghetti Fork exists.

Made by Donkey Products over in Germany, this genius utensil has a simple yet effective crank handle that helps eaters of wiggly pasta easily spin their forks. And you know what that means? More delicious ‘sketti eatin’.

Spaghetti Fork

While this product is featured in the hands of an adorable munchkin, let’s be real — us adults need the extra spaghetti help just as much as kiddos.

Rolognese Spaghetti Fork, $12.79 @Donkey Products

H/T Kid Crave + PicThx Donkey Products