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The Rise In Food Safety Recalls Actually Means Our Food Is Getting Safer

2018 has definitely been a whirlwind year in the world of food safety news, as it appears that new food poisoning outbreaks have been making headlines almost every other week. It’s caused some concern that perhaps outbreaks are increasing, which could mean that our food supply is less safe.

That’s likely not the case, though, as the actual amount of outbreaks doesn’t seem to be changing. The FDA is just getting a lot better at catching them.

Since President Barack Obama signed the Food Safety Modernization Act in 2011, the FDA has mobilized into more of a proactive body that’s been trying to snuff out food poisonings as early as they can. That has led to an increase in technology at the disposal of the food agency, and they’ve been using it to better identify potential nationwide outbreaks.

This technology, better known as whole genome sequencing (WGS), lets FDA and CDC officials identify outbreaks as they are starting to happen on a national scale. WGS keeps tabs on the DNA of specific species and subspecies of bacteria. As people get sick, samples are collected to identify these pathogens, which are then uploaded to the WGS database. Monitors can then pinpoint these microbes and track them across the entire nation. Thus, if two people in different parts of the country get sick from the same food and bacteria, the FDA and CDC can see that and determine that an outbreak is happening.

A few years ago, this would’ve been impossible to do, which is why so many illnesses likely flew under the radar. It’s estimated that 48 million illnesses attributed to food poisoning occur every year, but only a small fraction are reported. In 2016, for example, all of the reported food outbreaks together resulted in 14,259 illnesses, a minuscule number compared to the actual estimate.

Through new technology, though, the FDA can not only better respond to food poisoning situations, but also track down what food is responsible, who made it, and where it is currently being sold. Thus, recalls can be issued a lot faster to prevent more consumers from eating something that was contaminated and getting sick.

The FDA also has some other technology that helps it keep track of potential recalls prior to their outbreak. One of these systems is the Reportable Food Registry, a report filing software companies fill out the instant they believe contaminated food could have made it out to consumers. Food production facilities have 24 hours to fill a report out on that site from when that moment occurs. The FDA then reviews these reports and requests suppliers and recipients to be notified as needed. This creates a chain of reports that helps coordinate if a recall becomes necessary.

By using this software, the recall process is streamlined to happen a lot faster. It also acts as a cautionary system to have all potential scenarios covered. Not every report in the RFR will translate to a recall, but for the FDA and CDC, it’s better to be safe than sorry when it comes to food safety.

There are also third-party programs in place that the FDA keeps tabs on that help them identify potential food poisoning scenarios as well. The most well-known amongst these is iwaspoisoned.com, where consumers can report when they got sick and where they ate from that could have caused it. In the past, the site has been used to monitor several major food poisoning events at chains like Chipotle, where the FDA did eventually step in and close restaurants so they could investigate the potential outbreaks.

For the FDA, sites like these provide a huge benefit, since more customers reporting means that they can capture more of the millions of food poisonings that go unnoticed every year. It helps them catch food safety violations from restaurants at a better rate as well, ensuring that those are just as safe as the food that comes out of production facilities.

All of these new technologies have led to an overall safer food supply, as the FDA can catch nationwide outbreaks better, track pathogens across the country, and have information on potential recalls before they even begin.

This proactive approach to food safety does mean that we see more recalls in the news, but that only means that the government is getting better at catching them and preventing us from eating that food.

For us, this means that we can trust in a safer food supply from both grocery stores and restaurants. Of course, it doesn’t mean that we’re eliminating bacteria from the food, but when those contaminations do happen, we’re much less likely to consume them now thanks to the technology the FDA and CDC are leveraging.

So the next time you see a recall make headlines, know that it’s the result of the FDA and CDC doing their jobs better and decreasing your chances of getting food poisoning.

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Chipotle’s Latest Food Poisoning Outbreak Leaves A Devastating Blow

Just when everything started to look up for Chipotle, this happens.

A location in Sterling, Virginia was closed after multiple reports were posted to the crowdsourced food poisoning reporting site iwaspoisoned.com. Eight different reports were filed against the restaurant detailing 13 illnesses and at least two hospitalizations.

Jim Marsden, Chipotle’s executive director of food safety, told Business Insider that they were aware of the outbreak, had notified local health officials, and “are working with health authorities to understand what the cause may be and to resolve the situation as quickly as possible.” While many pathogens and microbes that cause food poisoning have similar symptoms, Marsden did suggest that norovirus was the causative agent for the reported illnesses.

“The reported symptoms are consistent with norovirus. Norovirus does not come from our food supply, and it is safe to eat at Chipotle.”

Norovirus causes symptoms like projectile vomiting, extreme stomach cramps, dehydration, and diarrhea. These develop within 12-48 hours of ingesting the virus, but those who get sick typically recover within 1-3 days. Outbreaks are typically caused by improper sanitary practices from food handlers, such as an employee not washing their hands properly after using the bathroom.

This isn’t the first time Chipotle’s had to deal with the nasty pathogen, as outbreaks involving norovirus have also occurred over the past couple of years that led to some serious backlash.

Regarding this particular outbreak, the restaurant affected has been closed and will reopen after a full sanitation cleanup. The financial impact this will have on Chipotle, however, is just starting to rear its ugly head.

Chipotle’s stock has already plummeted over $26 a share today (a staggering 6.4% drop) due to reports of the outbreaks spreading like wildfire. It’s unknown exactly how much more it will drop, but for a brand that was winning back customers and starting to gain footing again, this is a devastating blow.