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Grocery Health Packaged Food Science

Can Coronavirus Be Transmitted Through Food?

 The coronavirus pandemic has led to tons of information being published online on ways the virus can be transmitted. One question that continually pops up is whether food can be one of those sources of contamination.

So far, no research has come up that shows food or food packaging being able to transport or support the virus in any way. If you want to be extra safe, though, here’s a few tips and facts to know that should help reassure that buying, eating, and cooking food in these crazy times can proceed as close to normal as possible.

How The Virus Spreads In General

Coronavirus is a respiratory virus, and as such, tends to only spread via respiratory droplets in the air. This is why reducing contact and social distancing with others is crucial to limiting the spread of the disease. So far, this has been the only confirmed type of transmission for the virus.

According to preliminary (not peer-reviewed) research, the virus can be detected in the air for up to three hours, but can stay on other surfaces for longer. Packages and envelopes made with organic matter (ie. cardboard, paper) can hold it up for up to a day, while plastic takeout containers and stainless steel surfaces can retain for it as long as three days.

In terms of food and food packaging, the CDC has not yet detected any COVID-19 diagnoses that related to transmission via those sources. However, it should be stressed that they are still learning exactly how coronavirus spreads.

Is The Food I’m Eating Safe?

Generally, yes, the food we’re purchasing and consuming will be safe. This is especially true for anything we cook, as the coronavirus is fragile and is destroyed pretty easily by heat (cooking for > 150 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 3 minutes). Food has also been shown, as previously stated, to not be a transmission source for the virus.

The same can also be said for food packaging. However, since many transport containers (including cardboard and plastic) can be contaminated for up to a day, being safe and sanitizing both yourself and the containers prior to handling. Many stores and restaurants are on top of this already, with delivery drivers using gloves to handle food and grocers providing hand sanitizer at the door.

In terms of any food getting contaminated on the production end, that is highly unlikely. Again, food is not a known transmission vector, but all food (and food packaging) goes through processes to prevent pathogens and other disease-causing organisms from making its way into grocery stores. These include sterilizing of packaging, barring sick workers from showing up, and continual sanitation of any food contact surfaces.

Overall, purchasing and cooking food is going to be safe throughout the entire time this pandemic occurs. As long as everyone practices smart social distancing and diligently washes their hands, we’ll be able to mitigate the spread and, as many have put it, “flatten the curve.”

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Products

These Wine Bottles are Made from Cardboard, 85% Lighter than Glass

cardboard-wine

California-based Ecologic Brands partnered up with Truett-Hurst winery to reduce the carbon footprint of wine bottles. What are they using instead of glass? Recycled cardboard, of course.

The bottle features the standard Bordeaux shaped and has a plastic liner inside. PaperBoy Wine claims to have a 67 percent  smaller carbon footprint than glass and to be 85 percent lighter than traditional bottles. Even better, you can bring it hiking, collapse it after you’re done drinking (no unwieldy bottle to carry!) and deposit it in a recycling site on the way home.  So, is anyone ready to drink on the top of a mountain with me somewhere? Please? I’ll bring the paper wine.

H/T Design Taxi

Categories
Sweets

How You Get Hired: Graphic Designer Turns Resume Into a Box of Chocolates

box-of-chocolates-resume

What do you do when you’ve emailed your resume to 27394 companies and haven’t heard a peep from a single one? You take a different approach and turn that lifeless PDF attachment into a box of chocolates. After applying for countless positions and getting almost no response, graphic designer Rob Jervis redesigned his resume into a box with homemade oreo truffles, amaretto ganache and peanut butter cups.

“I handed these out to numerous top design and advertising companies in London and in Cambridge. Within an hour or two of receiving these, reputable companies were emailing me with the offer of paid internships and interviews and it was only 2 or 3 that didn’t reply,” Jervis told Creative Bloq.

He landed his dream internship at LFH, which eventually led to a full-time position. Lesson learned? There are a lot of inedible resumes out there, so make yours tasty.

Picthx Creative Bloq

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Hit-Or-Miss

Packaging Shows What Part of the Animal Your Meat Comes From

Corella Packaging

Informative packaging seems to have gained a bit more traction recently, like those bold, IKEA-esque sandwich labels. Although they haven’t gone mainstream quite yet, it’s a practical (and visually appealing) move for those who want to know what they’re actually eating.

Most recently, Spanish-based studio Fauna created a clever way to show consumers where their meat and cheese came from. The educational packaging, made for the Barcelona meat shop Corella, clearly displays the original location of the food and where on the animal the meat and cheese is from.

Corella Packaging

Corella Packaging

Corella Packaging

Your move, Purdue.

H/T PSFK + Picthx Fauna

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

7-Eleven Sandwich Packaging Gets a Bold, Ikea-Friendly Makeover

BVD Packaging

Grabbing a sandwich from your local convenience store is a decent on-the-go lunch option, but most times, it’s hard to decipher exactly what’s inside. Plus, you gotta be cautious about what your choice will say about your personality. It’s a tricky situation, but Swedish design agency BVD has come up with clever packaging to make this lunchtime debacle much easier.

These easy-to-read labels detail every sandwich ingredient, ensuring customers aren’t surprised by what’s inside. They also add a bit of artistic flair to standard food packaging, swapping tiny black font for larger, colorful ingredient listings.

BVD Packaging

BVD Packaging

BVD Packaging

BVD Packaging

This handy packaging is currently available at 7-Eleven and Press­byrån stores in Sweden.

H/T Design Taxi + Picthx BVD

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss Products

Food Packaged T-shirts

These food packaged t-shirts show shirts in a whole new light. It’s not about the t-shirt for this product, it’s all about the packaging. Now that’s a package I wouldn’t mind to handle. (Thx Incredible Things)