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Cravings Recipes Video

This Bro’s Pork Belly Tacos Will Cradle You Lovingly To Sleep

Pork belly is one of our favorite proteins to work with. The fatty, juicy cuts of meat are so versatile, the possibilities of what you can create with them are endless. Usually, though, we just fry them up and eat them between two slices of Wonder Bread. Luckily, Josh Scherer is a little more creative than we are and whipped up these amazing tacos.

The man known as Culinary Bro-Down came up with a pork belly tacos with fish sauce caramel recipe that’s near and dear to our hearts. Especially since we’ve been chasing the fish sauce caramel dragon for a while now.

Check out the pork belly tacos recipe video:

No doubt, this dish touches upon all the basic tastes the human tongue is capable of. Scherer is good at titillating us like that.

If you’re trying to get your hands on that pork belly taco recipe, don’t sweat. Scherer’s cookbook: The Culinary Bro-Down Cookbook: Recipes for a Dope-Ass Life is now available to order on Amazon. Also, be sure to check out Scherer’s Cheeseburger Pudding recipe.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Today I Learned: The Word ‘Ketchup’ Actually Means Preserved Fish Sauce

ketchup

You’d be hard pressed to find a condiment more “American” than ketchup, but it seems that, just like everything else in this great nation of ours, we stole that from someone else too.

Last week, NPR took a look at Stanford linguist’s Dan Jurafsky’s book The Language of Food, to puzzle out a few interesting etymological factoids — including, yes, the history of ketchup.

According to Jurafsky, our favorite tomato-based hot dog topping actually started as a kind of preserved Chinese fish sauce in the 5th century. The process for its creation involved “‘layering local fish in jars with cooked rice and salt, covered with bamboo leaves, and left to ferment.'” The result was pickled fish, and a leftover salty, fish-flavored sauce called ketchup — “tchup” being a word for sauce in Chinese and “ke” meaning “preserved fish.”

In the 19th century, British sailors who had traveled to Asia added tomatoes to the mix, and not too long after that, the fish was eventually ditched and Americans added sugar. The name ketchup, however, stuck.

How’s that for watercooler fodder?

Categories
Cravings

Vietnamese Bun Burrito

Powered by a recent obsession with Vietnamese flavors and the Vietnamese Bun, this bearded foodie has created what he calls the Vietnamese Bun Burrito. Rice noodles replace traditional burrito rice and tofu replaces beans. The salsa used is made of cucumber, tomato, mint, red onion, garlic, fish sauce, lime juice and salt. The steak is marinaded with fish sauce, soy sauce, brown sugar and chile paste. The other fillings include fried tofu, bean sprouts, vermicelli rice stick tossed in the fish sauce, lettuce, peanut and sriracha.