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Celebrity Grub Recipes

This Is How Your Favorite Chefs Make Scrambled Eggs

Even with food as simple as scrambled eggs, chefs always have their own special methods to cooking.

You might think you know how to cook a mean scrambled eggs, but between some of your favorite chefs such as Gordon Ramsay and Bobby Flay, you’ll learn that there’s so many ways to get that egg just right.

While every one of these chefs takes a different journey, the destination is always perfect, so take a look at all the methods, and see which works best for your scrambled masterpiece:

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Gordon Ramsay

Gordon Ramsay came out on Jimmy Kimmel back in 2004 and showed how he makes his scrambled eggs. One of his secrets involved adding butter during the egg whisking process. He also suggests moving the pan and spatula at the same time. He has also been known to take the pan on and off the heat a few times, like shown in this alternate video.

Of course, Ramsay got a little theatrical toward the end of the Jimmy Kimmel segment, but that’s just Gordon being Gordon.

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Melissa d’Arabian

Some chefs like putting milk in their scrambled eggs, but if you still want to add some creaminess without the lactose, Chef Melissa uses lactose-free milk, and it still works. We also learn from this video that butter has very low lactose levels, so it’s still generally OK to use, even if you’re intolerant. That totally depends on the person, though.

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Jamie Oliver

Jamie Oliver’s a ‘G’ so he actually has three different ways of making scrambled eggs. In this video he teaches us how to make scrambled eggs the English way, French way, and American way.

For the English eggs, he stirs it every 5 seconds, but he cooks at a medium heat, leaving curds and moisture in the final product.

For the French version, he cooks the eggs over boiling water. The slow cooking process actually takes about six minutes, so you’ll need some patience for the French method. These eggs come out so creamy, they actually look like grits.

The American-style eggs aren’t quite as complex, but you still have to slowly cook them, gently brushing the egg.

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Bobby Flay

This video isn’t very long, as Bobby probably assumes you know your way around a scrambled egg, but he does provide one key tip. Bobby doesn’t like to add salt until the very end of the cooking process, because salt can interfere with the classic curds you want in your scrambled eggs.

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Rachael Ray

It seems that Rachael’s audience members fall apart when it comes to making eggs, thankfully, she was there to school everyone on the cooking process. She teaches how to make fried eggs, but at the 3:30 mark, she digs into the scrambled goodness. Her key tip is to not just add butter, but to add FROZEN butter to the egg in order to enhance the flavor. She even adds hot sauce before whisking, because, hell yeah!

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Emeril Lagasse

Emeril really gets specific with his instructions, which is pretty awesome. He says the longer you whisk, the better, because you want to “incorporate as much air as possible.” He also says to let the eggs settle in the pan before you start stirring. To really make your scrambled egg experience special, he then says its best to serve them on a hot plate.

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Michael Symon

The Chew host didn’t have a demonstration in this video, but explained his idea of the perfect scrambled egg. Symon believes that scrambled eggs are meant to be “…creamy, fatty and delicious.” Symon also said he waits until the eggs are almost done cooking to add butter and creme fresh so it slows down the cooking and gives them extra creaminess.

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Martha Stewart

Martha Stewart believes that if you make the eggs right, you don’t have to add milk or water. Another decent tip is to not use a pan that’s too big. She also doesn’t salt them until after they’re plated, which is interesting, compared to the rest of the other chefs’ advice.

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Curtis Stone

Curtis Stone seems to believe in Michael Symon’s method of making the eggs as creamy and fatty as possible. Stone not only loads his scrambled eggs with cream milk, but he also puts mayonnaise to make it zesty. Interesting method, Chef Stone.

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Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Bourdain pays close attention to the egg itself, to the point that he makes sure he cracks the egg on a flat surface and throws them in the mixing bowl right away. He always uses fresh eggs, and makes sure he doesn’t over-beat them, waiting to the point where there’s white and yellow “ripples” throughout. The biggest key to him is getting them into the pan immediately after the whisking process, because they get a grayish tint if you let the beat eggs sit.

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Adventures

Emeril Sous Chef’d For A Culinary School Student To Help Her Win A $20K Scholarship

emeril lagasse

In addition to having celebrity chefs taking over a Las Vegas BuffetBon Appetit’s Vegas Uncork’d Food Festival also brought together Chef Emeril Lagasse and Le Cordon Blue student Elsa Sabellano to compete at the Chase Sapphire Preferred Grill Challenge. The stakes? $20,000 of scholarship money toward culinary education. The twist? Chef Lagasse would have to take orders from first-year culinary student Sabellano whilst competing against the other chef-student duo of Michael Mina and Kristina Burdick.

Chef Lagasse would also need to leave his everyday responsibilities as a restauranteur and executive chef behind, exchanging culinary direction and celebrity meet-and-greets, for… chopping onion and celery. Both chef-student duos created an iteration of Bouillabaisse, a traditional fish stew originally from France, with the Lagasse-Sabellano dish taking home the prize with its black garlic and lemongrass variation (pictured below).

Photos by Isaac Brekken for Bon Appetit.

emeril lagasse black garlic lemongrass bouillabaisse

Elsa Sabellano Jenstad, Emeril Lagasse, Krista Burdick, Michael Mina

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Hit-Or-Miss

The Evolution of Food on Television [INFOGRAPHIC]

Did you know that food has been represented on television since the 1940s? Did you know that Anthony Bourdain‘s appearance fee is reportedly nearly 1/10th that of Emeril Lagasse‘s $80k-100k price tag? Even Jamie Oliver demands nearly 6x the appearance fee that Bourdain does (sorry to hammer it home, our office is full of Bourdain fans).

Who’s watching food on television? Viewership seems skewed female, with 60% of the viewership being ladies, and 40% of them landing between the ages of 35-54. The infographic, put together by the folks over at Menuism, was recently brought to our attention, but it was initially published back in March of 2011, so the information is to be taken with a big grain of salt.

For example, Anthony Bourdain has more than 2 shows on television, particularly with the addition of his latest Travel Channel gig The Layover. We’re sure 2012 Anthony Bourdain demands a bit higher of a price than 2010 Bourdain, and the opposite might ring true for Emeril and his public worth.

What do y’all think?

 

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Video

Cooking With Emeril Lagasse’s Attorney

Ultimately, this is an advertisement for Philadelphia‘s new Cooking Creme, but the premise and initial disguise is one to be admired. The short segment features Emeril Lagasse’s attorney Mark Stein as he fulfills his life-long dream of being a famous TV chef like his renowned client. Using Philadelphia’s new product, Stein wows the audience by creating a Creamy Chicken Florentine, in ten minutes, Boom!