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Restaurants

This Restaurant Used A Lobster To Brilliantly Reimagine Elote

Lobster-Elote-Cover

If there’s one corn dish I’m always craving it’s the elote. The popular street dish in Mexico features a cob of corn that’s slathered with butter or mayonnaise. It’s then topped with a variety of flavors like lime juice, cheese, chili powder, or salt.

I didn’t get to try an elote until my early twenties. One bite, however, and I was hooked.

Before that, the closest dish I’ve had was the Vietnamese variation. This featured charred corn topped with a salty green onion oil. Still delicious in a different way.

Hop Phan, one of the co-owners of Dos Chinos and Sit Low Pho, came up with a dish that combined both the traditional Mexican flavors with some Vietnamese highlights. It’s called Lobster Elote and it’s beautiful.

Dos Chinos‘ Lobster Elote features a halved lobster that’s topped with a garlic aioli, fried shallots, green onions, shredded cheese, corn kernels and chili powder.

Check out how it’s made at the Southern California-based food stall.

You can find the Lobster Elote on the Dos Chinos secret menu. Your chances are better off at the brick-and-mortar location in Downtown Santa Ana’s 4th Street Market than at one of the truck’s, as they carry a limited supply.

They’re available for $27.75, unless there’s a promotion.

Categories
Features

15 Beautiful Things to Eat at Dodgers Stadium That Aren’t Peanuts or Cracker Jacks

Dodgers-Doyer-Dog-Pete

A staple for Los Angeles residents is to frequent Dodgers Stadium during baseball season. It is, after all, America’s pastime. When you’re not busy watching Kemp strike out, you’re probably wondering what you want eat. Now we don’t know about you, but peanuts and crackerjacks just don’t fill us up enough for a 3-hour game.

Though stadium food can be expensive, we at Foodbeast want you to get the most for your money. That being said, we took an afternoon and did some hard-hitting research on some of the best food options you can get at Dodgers Stadium. While their game against the Chicago White Sox was a tad disappointing, we made the most of our time there nonetheless. Our stomachs stretched so your wallets don’t have to.

You’re welcome.

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BBQ Beef Sandwich

Dodgers-BBQ-Pete

What: A 12-hour slow-cooked beef brisket smothered in BBQ sauce and topped with pickles and onions between two hamburger buns. Comes with coleslaw and potato salad. Tangy, hearty and they don’t skimp on the sauce.

Price: $10

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Elote

Dodgers-Elote-Corn-Pete

What: Roasted corn seasoned with cheese, mayo and chili powder. Super flavorful and tasty. Definitely worth the money but a tad bit messy.

Price: $5

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Louisiana Hot Sausage

Dodgers-Coleslaw-Dog-Pete

What: A spicy Louisinana sausage dog topped with coleslaw and bleu cheese. The sausage is buried somewhere under all that slaw, but it’s definitely a recommend.

Price: $9

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Italian Meatball Marinara Sandwich

Dodgers-Meatball-Sub-Pete

What: Italian meatballs that were hand-formed and thrown into a sandwich with special seasonings. Some of the best meatballs we’ve ever tried. Definitely worth it.

Price: $9

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Lasorda’s Pasta Platter

Dodgers-Meatball-Pasta-Pete

What: Penne topped with a zesty marinara sauce. Includes two hand-formed Italian meatballs and parmesan cheese. A carbo load option for all the photography we had ahead of us.

Price: $10

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Chicken Parmesan

Dodgers-Chicken-Parmesan-Pete

What: Hand-breaded chicken breast served on an Italian roll and covered in marinara sauce, Provolone cheese and grated Parmesan. Another sandwich from Mr. Lasorda’s Trattoria.

Price: $9

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Brooklyn Dodger Dog

Dodgers-Brooklyn-Dog-Pete

What: East Coast cousin of the Dodger Dog, the Brooklyn Dodger Dog is made with a casing that adds a much welcomed crunch. Just make sure to load it with condiments before feeding the Lasorda.

Price: $7.50

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Garlic Fries

Dodgers-Garlic-Fries-Pete

What: Fries smothered in a garlic marinade. A very popular snack at Dodger stadium, sold at practically every stand.

Price: $7.75

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Big Kid Dog

Dodgers-Big-Kid-Pete

What: A hot dog topped with a melted heap of mac n’ cheese and a generous handful of fritos. For the big kid in all of us.

Price: $8.50

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LA Extreme Bacon Dog

Dodgers-Bacon-Wrapped-Pete

What: A 1/3-pound all-beef dog that’s wrapped in three slices of applewood smoked bacon, smothered in grilled peppers and onions and topped with mustard and mayo. Because we Californians love bacon-wrapped anything.

Price: $9.50

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Doyer Dog, Jr.

Dodgers-Doyer-Dog-Pete

What: Drenched in nacho cheese, chili, jalapeño  and pico de gallo. For those with a taste for spicy, the Doyer Dog is the perfect choice.

Price: $8.50

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Frito Pie Dog

Dodgers-Frito-Pie-Pete

What: Made with chili, cheese and half a bag of Fritos. We recommend saving a few Frito chips to dip the chili cheese that falls out of your dog. Because you will spill.

Price: $8.50

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The Heater

Dodgers-Heater-Dog-Pete

What: Topped with a special bleu cheese coleslaw and smothered in a spicy buffalo wing sauce. The dog added the necessary heat to a pretty weak game.

Price: $8.50

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Homestand Special – Chicago Dog

Dodgers-Home-Stand-Special

What: Dodger Stadium has a tradition of making a customized hot dog in honor of the opposing team. Since they faced the White Sox the night we attended, behold the Chicago Dog. Made with a  slice of pickle, tomato and a buttload of relish. Fell to pieces after two bites, but the dog was picked clean regardless.

Price: $9

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Cannoli

Dodgers-Cannoli-Chocolate-Pete

What: A Sicilian pastry lined with chocolate, filled with creamy filling and topped with more chocolate chips. A sweet end to a bittersweet game.

Price: $6

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Honorable Mention: Kirin Frozen Beer