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A Dosa-Making Robot Is A Highlight At This Modern Indian Restaurant

This past May Dalup Modern Indian opened on 350 7th Avenue in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood. Featuring a pan-Indian menu developed by Bravo’s Top Chef alum Dave Martin, patrons are invited to create their own personalized korma bowls — or as Dalup calls them, “karma bowls.” With a focus on lighter and more modern versions of traditional Indian cuisine, each bowl includes your choice of base — biryani rice, long grain brown rice or citrus and tomato freekeh — and choice of dairy and gluten-free curry. Nat Loganathan, an owner of Dalup, has this to say:

“Born and raised in Southern India and now long time New Yorkers, we wanted to create a warm and welcoming eatery offering modern Indian cuisine. We wanted to keep the authentically bold flavors, but focus on making it light and fresh with everything prepared in-house.”

Dalup has its sights set on delivering consistency in food quality and operations. To achieve this, Dalup makes creative use of specialized equipment to bake their Naan bread and grill their kebab-style meat, which includes chicken, pork and lamb. One of the most interesting things Dalup has done is incorporate a custom robotic dosa machine that makes dosas à la minute. Yes, robots are indeed taking over. With technology playing a major role, Dalup also donates proceeds to Girls Who Code, a national none-profit organization whose mission is to close the gender gap in technology.

Dalup uses locally sourced meats and produce, housemade dough, spice blends, and supports sustainable and socially responsible production. So if you’re looking for tasty and healthy indian food with a robotic twist, Dalup Modern Indian may be the right fit for you.

 

Photos: Dalup Modern Indian by Simmer Group
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9 Facts About Fermented Foods That You Probably Didn’t Know

Fermentation is a glorious chemical reaction that converts a carbohydrate/sugar to alcohol or acid. Our founding father, George Washington, was so down with fermentation that he owned his own whiskey distillery. The waste his distillery produced was used to feed his pigs, which had to have made the best tasting bacon. If you’re short one presidential distillery, but want to learn more about fermented goods, keep reading.

1. Fermentation increases the nutritional value of raw produce

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In addition to the ramped up vitamins and minerals, fermented vegetables carry friendly bacteria and live enzymes. These cultures are beneficial to both your digestive and nervous system while protecting our bodies from harmful bacteria and other toxic substances.

2. Ancient Chinese people may have fermented the first alcoholic beverage

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In what was a blend of rice, honey, and grapes, a 3,000 year old beverage was discovered in clay pots made in 7000-6600 BC. Corrosion sealed the pots over time, preserving the last batch of the beer-wine hybrid for modern scientists to analyze. Dogfish Head Brewery recreated the drink, Midas Touch, in 2005 with the help of the researchers, and it won a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival in 2009.

3. Kefir gives you a good night’s sleep

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Not to be confused with the actor from 24, this protein-rich drink contains tryptophan. That’s the same amino acid causing you to yawn after that turkey dinner. Bonus: a serving of this milk-based pro-biotic provides 20% of the daily calcium you need.

4. Sourdough was more valuable than gold

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That delicious bread bowl we eat clam chowder out of was an integral part of the Gold Rush era. Alaskans would literally sleep with the dough to keep the yeast in it alive. San Franciscans enjoy their bread so much, their 49er mascot is named Sourdough Sam.

5. Kimchi is the national dish of South Korea

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A true staple in Korean cuisine, a custom (read: non-stinky) version accompanied Yi So-Yeon, the first Korean astronaut in space. When stored properly, a jar of kimchi can last for a couple of years.

6. Tempeh is tofu’s kick-ass cousin.

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While both are made from soybeans, their similarities end there. This Indonesian meat substitute has a better texture, making for tasty versions of fried chicken and tacos. The Swedish Department of Food Science even found a way to create this vegan-friendly protein without soybeans (with a blend of oats and barley) in regions where they can’t thrive.

7. Dosas are basically fancy crepes

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A fermented batter of rice and lentils, this popular South Indian snack is delicate and paper-thin when grilled properly. It’s the country’s answer to sliced bread, often stuffed with pickles and flavorful chutney sauces. To eat it like a local, put down the fork and knife and get your hands in there.

8. You can wear kombucha

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Microbial cellulose is the scientific term for dried kombucha culture, the “living,” tea-based beverage. A leathery texture, cellulose can be manipulated to create seamless clothing. Not bad for a fizzy and protein-rich drink that’s been around for over 2,000 years.

9. Sauerkraut helps you poop

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This aesthetically bland, German condiment is best known as a sausage topping. The shredded stuff shouldn’t, however, be mistaken for the pickled variety: the only ingredient mixed with cabbage is salt. Unpasteurized kraut carries the same kind of healthy bacteria found in yogurt, helping with both digestion and constipation.