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Alcohol Animals Beer

Foster A Dog And Get Free Busch Beer

We’re all spending A LOT more time at home and, as a result, our pets have become an even bigger part of our lives — they’re attending conference calls, workout sessions and happy hours! However, if you don’t have a dog to spend this time with, Busch Beer may have the answer you’re looking for.

There are a lot of dogs in serious need of homes, with animal shelters and rescue centers shutting down operations across the country, and the American beer brand wants to reward you for helping out. Introducing “Foster a Dog, Get Busch,” a new partnership between Busch and Midwest Animal Rescue & Services (MARS) that will reward anyone willing to open up their home with free beer.

Now through April 25, anyone who fosters or adopts a dog through MARS will receive a 3-month supply of Busch beer. Additionally, to kick off the partnership, Busch made a $25,000 contribution to MARS, a shelter that has been dedicated to placing animals in homes across the nation for the past 14 years.

So apply, simply fill out an application by clicking either of the links above (for MARS, mark Busch in the referral) to learn more. All entrants who are approved will receive the gift of Busch.

Busch isn’t the first brand to combine two of our favorite things. In February, Coors Light did a similar promotion for Valentine’s Day.

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Beer

Coors Light Promotes Puppy Love By Helping To Pay For Dog Adoption Fees

Dogs and beer. Arguments can be made that both are ‘man’s (or human’s) best friend.” However, why choose when you can have both? Just ask Monica Mathis. Motorworks Brewing recently reunited her with her dog, Hazel, via its Citra Cruiser.

Coors Light must agree because instead of being worried about having a special someone to cuddle up with this Valentine’s Day, the Golden, CO brewery is encouraging consumers to spend the day adopting a dog. In return, they will help pay fees for 1,000 dogs adopted between now and February 21.

“Cuffing Season is a major cultural trend and poses tension for our younger drinkers, as they navigate the stress of finding someone to spend the cold months with,” said Chelsea Parker, Marketing Manager at Molson Coors. “With almost half of millennials planning to stay in on Valentine’s Day, we wanted to help empower people to savor the day with Coors Light and a dog by their side.”

Anyone of legal drinking age who resides in an eligible state and adopts a dog between February 4–21, 2020 can have Coors Light help cover their adoption fees. Eligible participants can text “COORS4k9” and a picture of their adoption receipt to 28130. After review, the first 1,000 eligible participants will be given $100 to apply toward their adoption fees. Go here for more details.

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News What's New

The Eleven Regional Hot Dogs Everyone Needs In Their Life

There aren’t many things on this green earth that unify, and simultaneously drive apart, Americans quite like hot dogs, besides maybe politics and the NFL (which may as well be the same thing at this point, much to the chagrin of “Stick to Sports” Twitter). Hot dogs are universal in the sense that they’re consumed at every corner of the country. They’re also quite divisive, in that each region has their own spin on the mystery sausage, and which one is the best is a oft-debated subject.

Cities and states lay claim to hot dogs like BBQ and famous nightclubs. The Chicago dog, Dodger dog, Seattle-style dog, Detroit dog — all delicacies that locals will fiercely defend to their graves.

In truth, most of these dogs are remarkably similar: dog, buns, onions, peppers, cheese, and some kind of sauce. The attachment lies in the intrinsic pride that comes with the down-home origin story of each dog, most of which were long ago enough to not be quite remembered, as well as memories of better days and sleepless nights spent with friends stumbling into a hot dog vendor at just the right time.

One such cherished hot dog is Detroit’s Coney Island dog, which combines a Dearborn Sausage Company hot dog with beanless chili, a hit of mustard, chopped raw onions, and, of course, a helping of shredded cheddar cheese. These dogs are a part of the city’s culinary backbone, a place where a preference between local landmark American Coney Island or it’s next-door counterpart Lafayette can strain friendships. 

A few days ago, on Foodbeast’s podcast, The Katchup, hosts Elie Ayrouth and Geoffrey Kutnick were joined by Chris Sotiropoulos, the owner of American Coney Island to discuss the creation of the Detroit’s esteemed Coney Island Dogs. The company’s recent expansion to Las Vegas gives West Coaster’s the chance to try a regional dog that would be otherwise unobtainable. With the Coney fresh on our mind, the Foodbeast office began to think of other specialty dogs out there that we haven’t tried. 

So, we hit the streets and found eleven hometown favorites that we wish we could try, and here they are:

Sonoran Style

 

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The Sonoran hot dog starts with a frank wrapped in crispy bacon. Created in Tucson, AZ, the dog pays homage to the city’s Latino roots by using a split soft roll called a bolillo, and topping that with pinto beans, chopped tomatoes, diced onions, creamy mayo, mustard, and jalapeños. 

Chicago Style

 

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Maybe one of the most famous options on this list, the Chicago-style dog is as much a staple to the city as its biting wind. It uses a steamed Vienna sausage all-beef dog, which is then placed in a steamed poppy seed bun, and painted with the bright colors of tomato slices, sport peppers, dill pickle, chopped raw onion, relish, celery salt, and a drizzle of bright yellow mustard.

Scrambled Dog

 

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The Scrambled Dog was born in Columbus, GA 72 years ago, the brainchild of the late Lieutenant Stevens. This beast of a plate starts with a soft bun, then Stevens’ fresh chili, cut up weiners, more chili, raw onions, dill pickle slices, and a heaping handful of crunchy oyster crackers. 

Seattle Style Dog

 

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A Seattle-style hot dog consists of a grilled, split frank, nestled on a toasted bun that’s been smothered in cream cheese, grilled onions and, often, jalapeños. It makes sense that these are typically eaten during late nights out, because it sounds like something I would make with some potluck leftovers at 2AM.

Tater Pig

 

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This… is what it sounds like. A specialty of the Twin Falls County Fair, this monstrosity does just enough to constitute as a hot dog. Really, it’s a sausage. And it’s stuffed inside of a baked potato. Hence, the tater pig. 

Polish Boy

 

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Cleveland’s late night sausage of choice is a grilled kielbasa (a sausage broadly described as “any type of meat sausage from Poland.” Thanks Wikipedia). Place one of these guys on a sturdy bun, and top it with a handful of fries, coleslaw, BBQ sauce, as well as hot sauce, and you have yourself a Polish Boy.

Dodger Dog

 

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Los Angeles’ Chavez Ravine favorite has both steamed and grilled variations. Either way, the result is a ten-inch pork hot dog embraced in an equally as long bun, marked with relish, mustard, ketchup, and chopped raw onions. 

Carolina Style

 

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This version of the hot dog is popular amongst much of the Southeast United States. Beginning with an all-beef frank stuffed in a soft bun, it’s then covered in chili and piled high with coleslaw. Most people like to add mustard as well, to offset the sweetness of the slaw and savoriness of the chili.

New York Dog

 

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Contrary to every other aspect of their lives, New Yorkers like to keep their hot dogs simple. Strictly boiled in water of mysterious circumstances on a street cart, these dogs are topped with only mustard and sauerkraut for buyers to quickly shove down.

Italian Dog

 

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The answer to every New Jerseyan’s hangover, this dog originated in Newark. Here, bakers make plush loaves of pizza bread, which are like massive pizza crusts. After being split open, the bread is stuffed with a lightly fried dog, onions, peppers, and more deep-fried potatoes than can fit.

Tijuana Dog

 

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The Tijuana dog, though named after the town in Mexico in which it originates, gained it’s fame off the streets of L.A. Sold largely from street carts outside of sports games and clubs, this dog is wrapped in bacon and fried until crispy and snappy. It’s tossed into a soft bun and then served with grilled onions and peppers, mayo, mustard, ketchup, and sometimes a grilled jalapeño to give it some kick.

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Restaurants Video

Dogs Eat As Good As Their Owners At This ‘Barky Brunch’

Have you ever wanted to sit down to a meal with your beloved pup? Sure it’s something you can easily do in the comfort of your own home, but I’m talking about sitting down, at a restaurant, to a chef-prepared gourmet feast with your canine companion.

Ray’s and Stark Bar, a restaurant located just outside the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), is helmed by chef Fernando Darin.

A dog-lover himself, Darin utilizes the leftover pet-friendly food scraps from his kitchen to craft a rotating canine-friendly menu he calls the “Barky Brunch.” The menu was crafted as a means to reduce and recycle food waste, diverting them from landfills.

This season’s menu includes a watermelon sorbet, a chicken and broccoli rice bowl, Pizza Crust Dog Bones, and bacon-topped miniature peanut butter doggy cupcakes.

Our man on the ground, and two-time dog owner Richard Guinto sat down with veritable food beast and chew toy aficionado, Mana, to a sweet and savory brunch at the prominent Los Angeles restaurant.

The two shared a plethora of delicious bites, both for humans and doggies — including a brunch pizza and a decadent slice of salmon toast on the human side of the menu.

Anyone looking to treat their pooch to a lavish gourmet spread, Ray’s and Stark Bar will host pet owners every weekend at the restaurant’s open patio area. Humans and dogs, be sure to bring an appetite.

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Animals Art

‘Dogs In Food’ Is By Far The Cutest IG Account You Aren’t Following

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If there are two things the internet loves, it’s food and puppies, and this Instagram account masterfully combines both.

Meet “@dogs_infood,” the account that uses Photoshop for the betterment of mankind.

Incredible thought and precision goes into each post, as it’s not just randomly Photoshopping a dog on a food photo. The colors and textures are blended in perfectly, as in one photo, a puppy’s fur can melds seamlessly with taco meat, and in another, a white terrier can look almost exactly like a tub of popcorn.

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Perhaps the best part of Dogs in Food, is that you can have your own four-legged friend inserted in a dish. The bio states, “DM me if you want an edit of your dog in food.” That means if you want your cute little pooch transfixed into a bowl of mom’s spaghetti, this account can probably make it happen.

The very first post can be traced back to late January, and as of this writing, only has 28 posts, though it has already accrued a strong following of around 35,000+.

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Check it out for yourself, and bask in all the irresistible cuteness.

Frenchie marshmallow sundae with hot fudge #decadent

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Health Video

Here’s Exactly Why Dogs Can’t Eat Chocolate

We definitely know what foods can make your dogs sick, or even kill them. One of these items, as sweet as it tastes, is chocolate. Have you ever wondered exactly why something so innocuous as chocolate, however, can make your pooch so ill?

SciShow created a video explaining the science behind never giving your dog chocolate. Turns out, it’s all because of a molecule called theobromine.

The video explains that the molecule is an alkaloid which often produces physiological effects on both animals and humans. Theobromine causes an increase in heart rate, dilates blood vessels, and expands muscle energy.

Because animals have trouble processing theobromine much slower than humans, it builds up and causes nausea, convulsions, and potentially death. Since dogs are much lighter than humans, they can easily become sick from consuming even the smallest amount of chocolate.

Now that you know why chocolate is essentially the canine kryptonite, you won’t feel half as bad about not sharing with your furry best friend. Make sure to check out the video for an in-depth explanation.

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Cravings Features Sweets Video

This Bakeshop Has The Cutest Inspiration For Their Filipino-Inspired Sweets

When Kristine de la Cruz and Annie Choi decided to join forces and combine their respective expertise in confections and coffee, the result became one of Los Angeles’ best bake and coffee shops. The secret to the sweet success at their endeavor, FrankieLucy Bakeshop, may lie in de la Cruz’s mastery of Filipino-inspired treats from her already established Crème Caramel LA and Choi’s knack and know-how with coffee at her own Found Coffee.

Or perhaps the secret could be the inspiration behind their new shop’s name. For those curious, FrankieLucy was inspired by de la Cruz’s and Choi’s two cute pups whose names are — you guessed it — Frankie and Lucy.

Adorable dogs, yummy and unique treats, and top notch coffee? Yeah, the formula for success is all there.

Clearly FrankieLucy Bakeshop has something for everybody at their Silver Lake neighborhood location in Los Angeles. From delicious custards, quiches, brownies, cookies, and cakes flavored with deft Filipino influence to a unique craft coffee program featuring Demitasse and boutique beans, it’s no wonder that FrankieLucy has come out the gate with great achievement in their first few months after opening.

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Animals News

Taiwan Just Imposed Asia’s First Ban On Eating Dogs Or Cats

Pet lovers and animal cruelty advocates around the world are rejoicing over this landmark legislation.

Earlier today, the Legislative Yuan of Taiwan passed a series of amendments to the island’s Animal Protection Act. According to the China Post, these amendments include punishments for the sale, purchase, or consumption of dog or cat meat. Fines given to those caught can be as high as two million New Taiwan dollars, or over $65,000 US dollars (USD). Violators of the law will also be prohibited from registering pets or applying to adopt a pet.

Other amendments passed include increased punishments for intentional animal cruelty, with up to two years of imprisonment and two million New Taiwan dollars in fines for first time offenders and up to five years of jail time and five million New Taiwan dollars (around $163,000 USD) for repeat lawbreakers.

The amendments just have to be signed by the Cabinet and President of Taiwan before going into effect, which could happen as early as the end of this month.

Kuomintang legislator Wang Yu-min, the sponsor of the new laws, said the amendments came in response to some horrific acts of animal cruelty that occurred in Taiwan within the past year. These acts generated a growing need for legislation banning dog and cat meat consumption. Some local areas had such bans, but Taiwan had no overarching law preventing this consumption from taking place.

Across Asia, dog and cat consumption has drawn some harsh criticisms, with the Yulin meat festival in China being one of the most grotesque examples. To date, no national laws that outright ban such atrocities exist in Asia.

Hopefully, these amendments are just the beginning of a continent-wide wave of legislation that keeps such horrific acts of killing and eating cats and dogs from continuing.