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Restaurants Video

This ENTIRE Beef Shank Is Dropped Into A Deep Fryer, Katsu Style

There’s something primal and majestic about holding an entire slab of meat on the bone. Whether it be a tomahawk ribeye or a fat Disneyland turkey leg, that feeling calls to our inner carnivore and urges us to surrender to our most basic instincts and tear it apart.

That bone-in aspect has been the reason why steaks, pork chops, and other similar cuts of meat are often served bone-in. Beef shanks also come with the bone, but are typically braised to the point that attempting to hold it results in all of the rich, tender meat sliding off. At Momofuku’s Bar Wayō in Manhattan, however, you can get a whole beef shank served as if it were a massive fried drumstick.

Bar Wayō’s Katsu Beef Shank takes a whole braised hunk of beef, breads it, then drops it in the deep fryer. Then, when it’s ordered, it goes through a second breading and deep fry process before being served with a curry sauce, pickles, and other accoutrements. Turning it into a sandwich seems to be an especially baller move at the bar.

You can find the Katsu Shank on the menu most nights, but it’s available in hyper-limited quantities and on a first come, first-serve basis.

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#foodbeast Cravings Food Trends Restaurants

Korean Fried Chicken Is Ready For the Mainstream

What’s all the hoopla over KFC? No, not that KFC, I’m talking about Korean fried chicken, which is letting it be known it’s not just a substitute for American fried chicken, but is its own thing entirely. Spots like Momofuku Ko, Bonchon Chicken, The Gangjung and OG KFC franchise, Pelicana Chicken, are only a few that have made a name on the food scene. They’re waving the banner high for other established joints like The Prince and Kyochon, who have held it down in Los Angeles’ Koreatown neighborhood for years. Ever heard of quadruple fried chicken? I hadn’t either. But before we dive into South Korea’s take on fried chicken, let me give ya’ll a little background.

Established in 1977 in the basement of Seoul’s Shinsegae Department Store, the first modern-day Korean fried chicken joint was called “Lims Chicken.” As the first fried chicken franchise in South Korea, Lims became extremely popular amongst locals who were used to eating chicken boiled with rice and ginseng. The restaurant employed a cooking method that involves frying the chicken twice, thus creating a version of fried chicken that was thinner and crispier than its American counterpart. As the demand for fried chicken in Korea grew, it was the arrival of Pelicana Chicken in 1982 that really changed the game. 

Photo by: National Institute of Korean Language on WikiCommons, CC BY-SA 2.0 KR

Pelicana created what we know today as Korean fried chicken by being the first to drench it in sweet and spicy sauce. This approach is popularly referred to as “yangnyeom (seasoned) chicken,” and was a driving stimulus behind future innovations on the KFC scene.

Evolving as the years progressed, today there are four flavors and three styles of Korean fried chicken available for chicken lovers. “Dankganjeong” is the most traditional flavor of KFC, and is considered by some to be the Korean version of orange chicken. It’s fried twice using potato or corn starch mixed with seasoning, and glazed with a sweet garlic soy sauce. One LA-based restaurant that’s fittingly named and known for their dankganjeong is The Gangjung. They offer an array of flavors from garlic to barbeque. Out east in New York, modern Korean soul food gastropub, Windrose, provides an upscale presentation using a cloche as a makeshift smoker that when removed reveals glistening dankganjeong.

Another flavor is “padak,” which means “green onion-chicken.” It’s plain fried chicken smothered with slivers of fresh green onions. Palisades Park, NJ hot spot MaMa Chicken features generous portions of padak on their menu along with a range of options to keep your taste satisfied.

For the humble palate there’s plain ol’ fried chicken, which is named “huraideu.” David Chang’s famous Monofuku Ko has what is called “Fried Chicken But Cold,” which is exactly what you think. The prestige lies in the quadruple fried skin which maintains its crispiness even after refrigeration.

The other two KFC styles are “sunsal,” meaning “boneless” and “tongdak,” which means “whole chicken.” Lims Chicken originally popularized tongdak in the 1970s. It’s made by submerging a whole chicken into a fryer until it’s extra crispy, and is then served rotisserie style. 

Photo by: happy o’ne on WikiCommons, CC By 2.0 KR

As you can see, there’s a KFC style for every mood. Fried chicken will always be a comfort food staple and as Korean fried chicken continues to gain mainstream popularity, you can expect more unique approaches.

Next time you’re trying to decide how to appease your munchies after a night of partying, be sure to type “Korean fried chicken near me,” into your search engine.

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Brand Food Fashion Food Trends Packaged Food Pop-Ups Products What's New

Bloomingdale’s and Peach Mart Collaborate on a Snack Box featuring Asia’s Favorite Munchies

New York radio legend Minya Oh, best known as Miss Info, has curated a selection of Seoul-inspired goods for Bloomingdale’s seventh edition of “The Carousel: Window Into Seoul.” The Carousel is a rotating pop-up concept inspired by the idea, “retail is theatre,” which was coined by past Bloomingdale’s CEO Marvin Traub. Driven by culturally relevant themes and curated by special guest tastemakers, The Carousel adds a bit of “retailtainment” to the Bloomingdale’s experience. 

The latest concept honors South Korea as a cultural hub on the forefront of beauty, fashion, and music. To offer an authentic experience, Miss Info chose products from 25 trend-setting Seoul-based brands including W Concept, the largest fashion e-commerce and multi-brand retailer in Korea, and Amorepacific, one of the world’s largest cosmetics companies based in South Korea. There’s no shortage of options with products ranging between fashion, beauty, home categories as well as popular snacks. 

Home categories offer an array of products to enhance your domestic life like a Philips smokeless grill, a mandolin from OXO, a Scoby Kombucha kit and a rice cooker from Zojirushi.

This munchie experience is offered in Peach Mart snack boxes. Peach Mart is a take-away shop from Chef David Chang’s Momofuku. Snack connoisseurs are sure to be in heaven with each box containing a wide selection of popular snacks like Pocky and Koala’s March, perfect for sharing with a friend. In addition to snacks, “Window Into Seoul,” also offers three savory sauces from KPOP Foods, an up and coming Korean flavor-inspired brand. Flavors included are kimchi, honey glaze and their special KPOP sauce.

You can get your Asian snacks fix from “Window Into Seoul” at four Bloomingdale’s locations — 59th Street, Soho, Century City, San Francisco  and online from September 5th through November 4th. 

 

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Adventures Celebrity Grub News

Momofuku’s David Chang Is NBC’s Winter Olympics Food & Culture Correspondent

We’re just a few months away from the games of the 23rd Winter Olympiad, being held this time around in Pyeongchang, South Korea. NBC, who has been broadcasting the Olympic Games here in the US for as long as we can remember, is doing something special this time around. They’re bringing in David Chang, king of the Momofuku restaurant empire, to be a food and culture correspondent during the Winter Olympics.

Chang, who’s been on several television programs and shows, including the acclaimed Mind Of A Chef, will be in several “features and discussions” that offer a deeper look into the tradition, culture, and food of Korea, according to Eater. For those who follow David Chang’s Instagram, they’ve been exposed to his  prowess on the subject already. He’s been a true ambassador of Korean food for years, sharing some of the most delicious delicacies in the country on his social media feeds.

Korean Bbq, banchan & neng myun explosion #sodeulnyeok @nbcolympics #pyeongchang2018

A post shared by Dave Chang (@davidchang) on

However, it won’t just be Korean fare on the menu for Chang’s programs. A flurry of Instagram photos from his account earlier this year with Olympic-related hashtags include food of several cuisines sampled while Chang traveled through South Korea. These include items from the US, China, Japan, and Germany.

In an announcement about the new partnership, Chang notes the multicultural aspect of the cuisine in the country his father immigrated from, conveying his excitement to share it with the world during this year’s Winter Olympics.

“One of the great things about eating in Korea is that you can find delicious food everywhere, from street food to three-Michelin-star dining. It’s an amalgamation of influences from all over the world. It truly doesn’t get more multicultural than this.”

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Features News

How Chefs Feel About Roy Choi’s Zero Star Review From The NYT

Recently, a New York Times food critic made headlines by slapping Roy Choi and Daniel Patterson’s Locol restaurant with a zero-star review.

If you’re unfamiliar with Locol, the chefs opened the fast food restaurant with the intentions of bringing wholesome, affordable food to economically challenged areas, referred to as “food deserts,” such as Oakland and Watts, California.

The Times’ Peter Wells was not impressed by the restaurant, at all, and sparked a conversation about whether it was a fair assessment of the restaurant.

From the notion that he was unnecessarily harsh to a “fast food” restaurant, to the defense that the food should be better considering the famous faces behind the restaurant, opinions were flying out left and right.

We reached out to some highly-respected chefs, and also took to social media to get a sense of what the culinary brotherhood had to feel about the review.

Chefs have to deal with critics all the time, from newspapers to Yelp reviews, so they know what it’s like to take on harsh criticism. For the most part, the chefs felt the review was a bit of a stunt to bring attention to the newspaper, but there was also an overarching feeling that there is still a lot of value to what the chefs are trying to do with the restaurant.

Check out some chef reactions below and see if you agree:

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Andrew Gruel – Slapfish

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“I think we are giving way too much attention to this review. Obviously Wells reviewed this place because he knows he needs to create controversy in order to continue to entice readers. He is one step away from creating click-bait at the expense of chefs like Roy Choi.

With that said, I think all fast-food/fast-casual joints are fair game for reviews — negative or positive, they will draw customers to see what all the commotion is all about and that’s the real chance to win your guests. People saying he shouldn’t have reviewed the restaurant because of Choi’s altruistic perspective is bullshit. It’s a restaurant and should be treated with all the same standards as any other restaurant.

In our digital world, Yelp is more powerful in the long run, so let Mr. Wells try and keep creating fake food news.”

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Eddie Huang – BaoHaus

I received a 0 star @nytimes review, I pooped on Red Rooster, it’s important to hold people accountable even a saint like @RidingShotgunLA 🙏

— Eddie Huang (@MrEddieHuang) January 5, 2017

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Linh Nguyen – Crave 410

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“In my opinion the overall tone of the review was a bit harsh. Anyone who employs at-risk teens in a poverty stricken neighborhood deserves at least 4 stars.

As chefs, we are prepared to envision menus based on demographics, cost, availability and other variables. Reading some of the menu items LocoL provides I can see where the chefs were going based on flavor profiles, availability, and especially food cost. At the the end of the day, they humbled themselves with zero egos , bringing a seemingly impossible idea to fruition. They challenged corporate fast food on their own turf with healthier options at the same price point.

If that’s not ‘punk’ as fuck, I don’t know what is!

Also, The NY Times brought up good sentiments about the restaurant as well as even recommending items at the end of the article. It almost feels that Pete Wells wanted to give LocoL a couple stars. Maybe zero stars was intended to shock and get the article a little more shine.”

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Aron Habiger – Cooking on the Lam

aronh

“When a reviewer comes in for a chef like Roy Choi or Daniel Patterson, the expectations are set at a certain bar. Any time they open a new restaurant, there’s pressure… the limelight is put on you, the pressure’s on, and you know you really have to nail it out of the gate. You expect, the minute they open that door, that it’s spot-on.

I feel bad when I see a really bad review for chefs. I know it hurts, ’cause I’ve been in those shoes, too.”

David Chang – Momofuku

David Chang with the subtweet here, but we do all know who he was talking about. He also jumped on Instagram and posted a photo of Locol, hashtagging it #welocol.

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#welocol

A photo posted by Dave Chang (@davidchang) on

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Jason Quinn – The Playground DTSA

1-star-yelp-jason

“That’s pretty brutal. I feel as if Pete Wells makes a fantastic point, but I think it would have been better not to write the review. These are two great chefs, opening alternatives to the evil of McDonald’s, and getting shit on.

Not only have some people “forgotten” about these demographics, no one seems to be concerned about their health.

I always thought it was very bold of Choi and Patterson to take on this venture. Always admired their dedication to feeding the masses, and didn’t know how it would end up. I certainly didn’t think the New York Times food critic would come out to write about them.”

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Celebrity Grub Features

Chef David Chang Thinks You’re Overthinking Your Burger-Making

burgerchang

Summer’s almost over and you probably looked through countless YouTube videos, trying to figure out how to make the perfect burger. Yet with all the research and studying, you’re trying way too hard in chef David Chang’s eyes.

If you don’t know Chang from his popular Momofuku restaurants, you’ve probably seen him on the PBS show, The Mind of a Chef, where he hosted the very first season back in 2012.

We got a chance to dig into the mind of this esteemed chef a bit, and the former James Beard winner for Outstanding Chef gave us his insight on the art of burger-making during Budweiser’s 2016 Bud & Burgers Competition in Philadelphia.

The decorated chef said the secret is to, “Keep it simple.” Chang said if you have quality beef, the burger is going to be good. He added that a common mistake is overthinking the whole process.

If Chang’s making burgers, he said all he needs are the beef patty, cheese, bread, and pickles.

That type of straightforward approach seems to be a common belief among chefs, as Vice chef Matty Matheson once shared his advice on the perfect cheeseburger, saying, “All the best things in the world are simple.”

The same goes for Michelin-starred chef April Bloomfield, whose idea of a perfect burger is good beef, cheese, onions, and the bun.

While it’s not unusual to see burger creators nowadays load up their burgers with cheese, or cover them in Flamin’ Hot Cheetos, these guys just might be doing the most.

Ironically, while Chang said the best burgers aren’t complicated, he voted for a burger stuffed with pineapple, jalapenos, barbecue sauce, and thick cut bacon while judging Budweiser’s search for the best burger in America.

Go figure.

budburgers

photos via Getty Images