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Slow Cooker Concha Bread Pudding Might Be The Easiest Dessert Ever

One of the holiday season’s most decadent dessert ideas might also be one of its easiest to make: Concha Bread Pudding that you can set and forget in the slow cooker.

concha bread pudding

Made with a fragrant custard with notes of cinnamon and rum, all you need to add in otherwise is a few chopped-up conchas. Day-old pieces of the Mexican sweet bread are best, but any leftover or fresh ones you have will work perfectly for this bread pudding.

Other than that, it’s a simple manner of loading everything into the slow cooker, setting it for a few hours, then coming back to a luscious and sumptuous treat. This concha bread pudding is the perfect dessert to have going on in the background while everything else comes together for the holiday feast.

You can find all of the ingredients necessary for this one-pot sweet at Northgate Market, who will also have the full recipe in a holiday cookbook coming out soon. In the meantime, you can peep the directions to get this festive food party going below:

Servings: 5

Ingredients
4  conchas (7-8 cups), cut into 1-inch pieces (day-old conchas are perfect for this!)
2 1/2 cups heavy cream
6 egg yolks
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 1/2 tablespoons Bacardi rum
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
Vanilla Ice Cream for serving

Directions

Step 1
Butter the inside of a crock pot/slow cooker with 1 tablespoon of unsalted butter. Add the concha cubes to the pot.

Step 2
In a large bowl, whisk together the heavy cream, egg yolks, brown sugar, cinnamon, rum, salt, and vanilla extract. Pour the egg mixture over the conchas, ensuring it covers every piece. Gently push down on bread with a spatula or spoon so that the concha on top soaks up the liquid as well.

Step 3
Cover and cook for 3 1/2 hours on a low setting. Turn off the crock pot and let cool for 15-20 minutes before serving with a heaping scoop of creamy vanilla ice cream.


Created in partnership with Northgate Market

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Products

Magical Sous-Vide Robot Prepares Your Meals and Knows Your Tastes Better Than You Do

mellow-sous-vide

Mellow is a $400 sous-vide machine being touted as the “new kind of kitchen robot.”

Not sure what the old kind of kitchen robot was, but hey, that’s technology for ya.

This sous-vide robot is easy for any home cook to use. It’s like the personal chef you always wanted, but could never afford. Think the crock-pot’s more attractive sister. Maybe that one was a little far-fetched, but you get our point.

To use Mellow, seal ingredients in a bag, then submerge it in a tank of temperature-controlled water –it will keep your food at refrigerator levels until you’re ready to start cooking.

The best part is, you can control the countertop sous vide from the comfort of your smartphone, so you don’t even need to be in your kitchen for it to start dinner. Tap the Mello app to decide what temperature, how long, and when to begin making your meal. That’s it. By the time you get home, you’ve got a steaming bag of dinner ready to throw on the table, up to 6 servings worth.

Oh, and for all you health-conscious eaters out there, using the machine preserves the nutrition in your food and eliminates the need for oils or fats, and uses less electricity than your stove. Now, if only we could scrounge up enough pocket change to test drive one of these bad boys.

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Products

The ‘Wonderbag’ May Soon Replace Your Beloved Slow Cooker

wonderbag

Crock Pots may soon have some competition in the slow cooking game thanks to Wonderbag. The cleverly named invention is indeed a wonder as its insulated design allows food to safely continue cooking without the need for additional energy. The process is extremely easy and also helps alleviate that nagging in the back of your mind. Y’know, the one when you knowingly leave an appliance plugged in for 8 hours to cook while you’re at work.

As seen in the image above, all you have to do is bring your started recipe to a rolling boil for as little as 5 minutes [sometimes longer for meat recipes] and seal it with a lid. Turn off your stove and transfer your hot pot to the Wonderbag. Let it stand for the required amount of time to ensure cooking is completed. Once your dish is ready just open the Wonderbag and uncover your pot lid to find your recipe piping hot ready for immediate consumption. Don’t worry about your dish being questionable, because of the Wonderbag’s insulation your food can be safely kept within its warm walls for up to 12 hours without it falling to an unsafe temperature. Recipes that can be made in this innovative creation include everything from more complex curries and stews, to something as easy as oatmeal. Aside from heating the Wonderbag can also keep your favorite drinks and food cold for up to 12 hours.

Because the Wonderbag is cordless and doesn’t require any power, it’s perfect for use nearly anywhere. Sarah Collins, creator and founder of Wonderbag originally developed her invention as a means to conserve cooking energy in developing nations such as her native South Africa. Besides saving energy the Wonderbag helps to reduce carbon emissions as well as wasted food from burnt pots. It also saves water, less evaporation occurs while insulated and reduces fuel usage by nearly 30 percent.

Wonderbag is now available in the U.S. for $50 via Amazon. For every Wonderbag sold in the U.S. a Wonderbag will be donated to a family in need in Africa. For more information on the Wonderbag peep the YouTube video below.

H/T HuffPo + PicThx Wonderbag

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Features

Gourmet's: 20 Tools That Changed the Way We Cook

I was off reading some heavy content on chow.com when I came upon an article that international food magazine Gourmet.com did about the “20 Tools and Technologies That Have Changed the Way We Cook”. I found the article so enlightening and informational that I knew I had to post the entire thing here on our website. So bear with me and walk yourself through the changes in cooking since the earliest of times.