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Celebrity Grub Culture Health

Of Course Gordon Ramsay Would Have The Best Hand Wash Tutorial

Between Masterclass demonstrations, YouTube tutorials, and stunning exhibitions of his cooking prowess on any of his successful TV shows, Gordon Ramsay’s skills in the kitchen and the way he demonstrates and teaches them are a sight to behold. The decorated chef and restaurateur is effortless when mentoring the world in cooking and that genius also extends to teaching us how to wash our hands.

Due to the heightened urgency to wash our hands in the midst of this covid-19 pandemic, hand washing tutorials have become the norm everywhere you look. The Center for Disease Control advises to “wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.”

As seen in the Instagram post from Ramsay’s account, the fiery chef can also whip up a mean hand wash how-to, all while raising awareness for it through the use of the hashtag #nhshandwashchallenge, with the NHS portion referring to the United Kingdom’s National Health Service.

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Grocery News Now Trending

Grocery Stores Must Help Seniors Shop, Here’s How

Update 3/17: Several stores have taken initiative in helping the elderly shop before stores open, and in some cases even pregnant women and those with special needs. You can always call in to see if your local supermarket is offering these services, but several stores have been spotted doing so, such as:
Northgate Market, Ralphs, Target, Vallarta Supermarket, Smart & Final, Superior Grocers, Dollar General, and Stop & Shop.

I don’t need to tell you how swamped grocery stores are in the midst of this national emergency. You’ve watched the news, you’ve seen the videos circulating online, and you’ve certainly gone out to see the madness for yourself.

Fear of the unknown had caused people’s survival instincts to kick in, and now there’s no toilet paper.

As everyone shops and prepares themselves for the worst, the elderly are most vulnerable in this time, and their usual shopping time has been invaded by hoards of shoppers wiping out store shelves.

Measures should be taken to ensure that those of advanced age have a shot at getting their grocery shopping done, as well.

Over the weekend, Northgate Market in La Habra took a shot at letting 65-year-olds and up go into the store first, giving them a 30-minute head start.

It was a noble effort, and a good starting point, but as someone who has worked in a grocery store with a heavy flow of elderly people, and frequently helped them with their shopping lists, I know that’s not enough.

At best, 30-minutes gives them a chance to walk to the household products aisle and grab a roll of toilet paper, and maybe scurry over to the meat department, but definitely not enough time to do any sort of decent shopping.

Monday, Northgate adjusted this effort, not only expanding it to a full hour before official opening, but also expanding past their La Habra location, and doing it at all 41 of its stores, which should be the standard for all stores in these trying times.

In Britain, “Iceland Supermarket” has given the elderly a full hour head start, citing that it gives them a more “comfortable shopping environment,” according to Today. So between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m., it’s prime time for those of advanced age.

At minimum, grocery stores should be letting in the elderly an hour early, if not two.

Also, stores are experiencing record sales, and even hiring like crazy at the moment. Use that abundance of hires, and have them go through the senior shoppers’ grocery list. There’s a good chance a clerk can run across the store and grab a gallon of milk a lot faster than a 70-year-old shopper with an arthritic knee.

By now you’ve probably seen the tweet by Rebecca Mehra, where she said:

“I went to the grocery store this afternoon. As I was walking in I heard a woman yell to me from her car. I walked over and found an elderly woman and her husband. She cracked her window open a bit more, and explained to me nearly in tears that they are afraid to go in the store. Afraid to get sick as they are in their 80’s and hear that the novel coronavirus is affecting older people disproportionately. And that they don’t have family around to help them out. Through the crack in the window she handed me a $100 bill and a grocery list, and asked if I would be willing to buy her groceries.

I bought the groceries and placed them in her trunk, and gave her back the change. She told me she had been sitting in the car for nearly 45 min before I had arrived, waiting to ask the right person for help.”

Yes, the story sounds a bit theatrical, and you never really know what’s true or not on Twitter, but whether you believe her or not, the viral tweet brought awareness to an issue that was not being talked about at the time, and that’s giving the elderly a fighting chance to get their groceries.

In Southern California, multiple grocery stores have adjusted their hours to give them more time to adapt to the influx of shoppers. Northgate is one of them, and even Ralphs shortened their hours, opening later and closing earlier in an attempt to give its employees more time to stock shelves, clean, and do their usual work before and after the madness.

If all these store hours can be adjusted, surely they can follow Northgate and Iceland’s lead, and also have a little bit of empathy for those who can’t wrestle away a case of water from you during the regular hours.

We now know that grocery stores will continue to be open in this quarantine period, and supply chains are reportedly in no danger, so hopefully the waves of shoppers will be a little less hectic, and everyone can get their food in less of a panic.

Either way, in a time where it feels like it’s every man for himself, maybe we should take a step back and think about those around us who might need some help.

Categories
Health News Packaged Food

LA Mayor Says ‘There’s No Major Shortage Of Food’ As Major Markets Seek Workers

Photo Courtesy of Ralphs

As more and more folks are staying at home to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, also known as the coronavirus, restaurants and public businesses have been temporarily shutting down to help prevent the spread.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti made an announcement this morning to help calm the masses who are desperate to stock their households with supplies in the trying weeks to come.

“Supply chains are completely uninterrupted, and there’s no shortage of food,” Garcetti said as he stood in a Ralph’s Distribution Center in Paramount, CA. With him were executives from major grocery chains such as Food4Less, Ralph’s, Northgate, and Gelson’s.

Stores are short on popular items during this pandemic because of people purchasing more than they need, and as a result, employees are unable to restock from the suppliers in a timely manner. During the livestream the mayor encouraged consideration for others, especially the elderly, when out shopping for supplies.

Kendra Doyel, Vice president of merchandising for Ralph’s, stated that both Ralphs and Food4Less are actually hiring during these trying times to help keep the shelves stocked at a more manageable rate. Those who need to look for work in the Los Angeles area as more business close down because of the virus may consider employment at these major grocery chains during this time of concern over the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Fast Food

Blaze Pizza Cancels Annual Pi-Day Deal Due To Coronavirus

It has become tradition at Blaze Pizza to sell its personal-sized pizzas for $3.14 every March 14.

The day itself is known nationally as “Pi-Day” and Blaze takes advantage by selling its pies for cheap.

However, with recent fears over the spread of the coronavirus, and recommendations to stay away from large crowds, Blaze has decided not to go forward with its usual in-store “Pi-Day” deal.

It is not unusual for huge lines to form for this day, as a $3 pizza is pretty solid compared to its usual $8-$10.

Fans will still get a chance to celebrate, though, as those who use the Blaze Pizza app will automatically have $3.14 added to their account, starting March 16. In order to get the reward, you will have to have the app downloaded and the account created by 11:59 p.m., Sunday March 15.

Is it the same as getting a whole pie for that price? No, but it is something.

Hopefully by this time next year, things will go back to normal, and we can all enjoy our usual Pi-Day discount.

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Culture News Opinion What's New

Food Delivery Services Offer Customers Incentives During Covid-19 Concerns, But What About Their Drivers?

Yesterday, Postmates announced that it would be slashing delivery fees in half for orders worth more than $10 between the hours of 10am-2pm, capitalizing on the recent wave of social isolation due to COVID-19. 

This comes only two days after the company made a dual announcement, stating that it planned to waive commission fees for restaurants, therefore allowing them to join and use the app for free, as well as pay for any COVID-19 medical expenses their drivers accrued. 

The two announcements serve as a microcosm of the juxtaposition delivery services currently lie in: with business surging due to the increased number of people staying home,  what’s the proper response to their workers, who lie at the frontline of exposure, and their struggling restaurant partners?

There appears to be no clear cut answer. 

Postmates took some of the first action in early March by introducing non-contact deliveries, allowing customers to choose a drop off location for their food. But, with most companies working from home, American cities beginning to shut down entirely, and most delivery services remaining tight-lipped about the issues, drivers felt left in the dust.

As lawmakers pressed companies like DoorDash and Uber to improve situations for their workers, food delivery services scrambled to distance themselves from the issue. DoorDash and InstaCart quickly announced paid sick leave for workers diagnosed with COVID-19, and Postmates took the aforementioned measures.

This still doesn’t leave drivers with much room to breath, though. If one is infected, money will be lost regardless, either in the form of time spent going to the doctors or time spent quarantined.

Grubhub took effort to help only restaurants, with a similar strategy to Postmates, by slashing their marketing fees. No word, however, was said about the affected Grubhub delivery drivers.

Though, certainly, these companies seem to be trying to help their associated restaurants and individuals, business is still going on as usual.

And we’ve seen, in multiple countries, what will happen if business goes on as usual, and what happens when it doesn’t.

Delivery services can’t come to terms with the scale of the virus, and the measures it’s going to take to prevent widespread infection. There’s too much money to be lost. And, with no one wanting to leave the house, and drivers relying on the wage they earn for sustenance, the money will continue to roll in.

As long as delivery companies are delivering, and drivers are still dependent on work, ordering delivery with timely promotions doesn’t offer much of an ethical issue. Though, the privilege of being able to put another human at-risk to allow oneself to self-isolate should be noted, and also warrant a hell of a tip.

But, if these companies are as serious as they say they are about preventing infection, that would mean halting business for a week or two, since their entire business plans revolve around sending drivers through different cities to interact with others. This, in turn, would probably harm already struggling restaurants, as well. 

It’s hard to see a right answer with how our gastronomic economy is set up. It’s an ecosystem that runs out of necessity, one that won’t stop turning until it’s forced to.