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News What's New

Rouxbe Is Offering Free Online Culinary Classes


Photo: Rouxbe

The world is undergoing a slight upheaval at the moment. There’s a pesky bug on the loose that’s caused governments worldwide to quarantine their cities. This sounds like something right out of a summer blockbuster, yet unfortunately, it’s real life. As we collectively come to terms with this slower, socially-distanced, more OCD experience, we’re inevitably faced with figuring out how to occupy our time indoors. 

Rouxbe, the leading online culinary school, has responded to social distancing by offering 30 free days of membership. With this membership, you have access to 13 full culinary courses and 75 lessons, traditional and next-gen culinary foundations and techniques, as well as live events with chef instructors and culinary experts covering a wide range of topics. Ken Rubin, Chief Culinary Officer at Rouxbe, shares their mission:

“With so many of us practicing social distancing — either by choice or mandate —  it is inevitable that we will be eating at home. There is no reason we should settle for mediocre food or processed foods, when it’s possible to learn basic techniques that make cooking with pantry staples not only more enjoyable but also efficient and healthy.  By providing this free trial, we hope home cooks will take an opportunity to learn this important skill while taking care of themselves and their family at the same time.” 

Rubin touches on something very poignant — the idea of making the most out of your time. With all the troubling news and uncertainty, it’s easy to stress out and feel anxiety. Being stuck indoors gives us the opportunity to work on projects, binge watch shows or learn new skills.

Rouxbe’s free 30-day membership is timely and perfectly suited to anyone who enjoys spicing up their household’s meals. You can sign up for your free trial here

Categories
Culture Film/Television Products

Star Wars Cookware Featuring All Your Favorite Characters Is Dropping Soon

Le Creuset has been a household name in cookware for nearly one hundred years, crafting cast-iron French Ovens, roasters, and cocette-cooked meals for kings and commoners alike. Now, the company has partnered up with another prolific brand that has ingrained itself in humanity’s rich narrative, a brand that’s been around a long time ago… in a galaxy far, far away.

On November 1, Le Creuset will be launching an exclusive Star Wars line of cookware. If you’re a fan of the ample cinematic history behind the sensational space opera, you better mark your calendars.

The set will be available at Lecreuset.com/Starwars as well as Le Creuset Singature Boutiques, Outlet Stores, and Willliams Sonoma locations beginning Nov. 1. The Le Creuset x Star Wars line will include a Han Solo Carbonite Roaster, Tatooine Round Dutch OvenDarth Vader Round Dutch Oven, R2-D2 Mini Cocotte, C-3P0 Mini Cocotte, BB-8 Mini Cocotte, Death Star Trivet, Millennium Falcon Trivet, and a Porg Pie Bird.

At the forefront, an incredibly exclusive pièce de résistance of the set is the Tatooine Round Dutch Oven an item in which only 13 exist in the world. Each will be hand-painted in Le Creuset’s French l’Atelier to reflect the aesthetic of the desert planet that embraces two suns.

Man, as cool as the Han Solo roaster is…  I need to cop this Tatooine Dutch Oven. It’s a once-in-a-lifetime work of art.

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Twitch Video What's New

You Can Control This Live Competitive Cooking Series From Home

I’ve often found myself shouting at the screen when watching a competitive cooking show, hoping that by sheer force of will the contestant will heed my advice. Futile, yes, but a practice I’ve been unable to shake for the better part of a decade. For anyone and everyone who have felt that frustration, there’s a new competitive cooking series that will quell that rage.

Foodbeast is introducing it’s all new Kitchen League, a live-cooking competition that airs exclusively on Foodbeast Twitch.

Watch FOODBEAST KITCHEN LEAGUE: INSTANT RAMEN w/ @BookofElie and @Outhereflourishing from foodbeast on www.twitch.tv

Here’s how it works:

Two chefs will be given a theme each week that they will have to base their dishes up0n. They will then have 30 minutes to cook a winning dish. During that time, however, Twitch viewers will have the chance to donate BITS to throw a wrench in their segment. For example, for 150 bits, the chef would not be allowed to use a knife for a minute. For 1,000 bits, the chef has to turn off the heat on their stove for a minute. So you can imagine the hijinks that will ensue once those and other sabotage from BIT donations come into play.

Once the time limit is reached, chefs will be judged by a guest host as well as the Twitch audience.

During our live Beta Test, Foodbeast Elie Ayrouth went up against Constantine Spyrou, and the two had to come up with a creative dish based on an instant noodle theme. You can check out how it all went down in the video above.

This Thursday will kick off the inaugural Foodbeast Kitchen League and feature Chef Saengthong Douangdara go up against professional eater and entertainer Raina Huang. The theme: Spicy.

Check out the livestream this Thursday Aug. 8 at 11am PST at Twitch.tv/FOODBEAST. There will also be Foodbeast Kitchen League streams every Thursday during the month of August leading up to Foodbeast’s Nood Beach, taking place on Sunday Sept. 1.

Featured Image Courtesy of Evan Lancaster and OEDesign
Categories
Culture Features Hit-Or-Miss Now Trending Opinion

I Spent Seven Days Cooking Like Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Bourdain passed away June 8 2018, leaving behind a legacy of acceptance and adventure. He also left us some badass recipes.

Anthony Bourdain Appetites Cookbook

When I think of Anthony Bourdain cooking in authentic Bourdain fashion, I think of him surrounded by fellow badass, pirate-esque characters that use foul language, tell dirty jokes and likely have a hip flask hiding somewhere in their aprons. So when I asked my big brother Jake if he’d spend the week making Tony Bourdain recipes with me and he jokingly replied, “We goin’ old school Bourdain and gettin’ some blow?” I knew I’d picked the right man for the job.

Although we adore all versions of the beloved bad boy chef, rather than the Kitchen Confidential, illicit drug-partaking, sword-wielding Tony, we decided to go with the more recent version — the one we all watched fondly as he traveled the world and taught us that cuisine we’d never tried could be delicious and people we’d never met could be fascinating and neither were anything to fear, but to welcome and seek out with enthusiasm.

Anthony Bourdain adventured to nooks and crannies all over the world — he wandered into hole in the wall dives, enjoyed fine dining prepared by Michelin-star chefs and he was a guest in the homes of local families from nearly half of the countries on Earth. Well, this week, he’s in my family’s kitchen — we’re going all out and trying to master or at the very least muster, recipes from his Appetites cookbook. From goulash to lobster rolls to Osso Bucco, here goes nothing!

 

Day 1: Sausage and Pepper Hero  

Sausage and Pepper Hero, Appetites Cookbook Anthony Bourdain

Inspired by Tony’s many walks of shame to the sausage and pepper vendors that were a constant at the New York street fairs, these sandwiches felt like a simple start to the intimidating week that lay ahead. One pan, extra virgin olive oil, a few peppers and onion, some sweet Italian sausage, some hot Italian sausage, and hero rolls — a very simple grocery list that rang in at less than 25 bucks. The whole prep time from start to finish was 25 minutes and the end result? Tasty.

This recipe was super easy — almost too easy. It made me feel like I was half-assing the cooking. I’d recommend it as a great dinner when you’re low on time and want to throw together something that isn’t much hassle but still delivers. I’d encourage anyone who does try this one to get their hands on some decent bread, maybe from the local bakery because the store bought French rolls were total nonsense. I also recommend having some condiments handy like mustard or my personal favorite, Mexican crema. We paired this dish with some Brooklyn, NY RESIN, Six Point Ale because a cold beer seemed the most appropriate complement to a messy street fair hero.

Cost: $24.74

Prep time: 25 minutes

Level of Difficulty: 1 / 5

Level of Deliciousness: 3.7 / 5

Pro Tip: Buy decent bread and condiments.

 

Day 2: Goulash

Goulash, Appetites Cookbook Anthony Bourdain

In Season 5, Episode 6 of Parts Unknown, Bourdain travels to Budapest where he visits the home of a singing gypsy, with impressive cooking chops. This recipe is inspired by that trip. I honestly had no idea what goulash was when I first came across this recipe, but it seemed attainable calling for beef chuck and veggies that you can find easily at your local grocer (to say finding ingredients for some of these recipes has been tricky is a monumental understatement). Oil, spices, a variety of vegetables chopped and chopped — then chopped some more — and some beef chuck, throw it into a pot and voila! Well, not exactly, it took two adults who admittedly did not chop at optimal efficiency several hours to prepare all the ingredients to throw into said pot.

I’m slightly embarrassed to admit this, but we began prepping our goulash at 6:15 P.M. and did not sit down to eat it until 10:30 P.M. That’s correct, it took us over four hours and four bottles of wine to master the goulash, but master it we did! I think we were pleasantly surprised because while we of course trusted Chef Bourdain’s master recipes, we were skeptical about the size of some of our vegetables. My fiancee was going on and on about the gigantic parsnip and I’ve heard that produce is bigger in California, i.e. giant grapefruit sized onions. And we did use nearly an entire container of paprika. We were adamant though, about sticking to the recipe exactly as we read it and good God, I’m glad we did. Because when we finally sat down with our millionth glass of Hungarian wine and bowls filled with piping hot goulash, a dollop of sour cream and a slice of rye bread to mop up any remnants, it was heaven.   

Cost: $46.77

Prep time: 4 hours and 15 minutes (It should only take half this time if that.)

Level of Difficulty: 2.5 / 5

Level of Deliciousness: 4.5 / 5

Pro Tip: Chop your vegetables wisely, make your friends help you.


Day 3: New England Lobster Rolls

Lobster Deal Appetites Cookbook, Anthony Bourdain

Lobster rolls, a Cape Cod classic with just a handful of ingredients: lobster, mayonnaise, celery, some seasonings and bread — no biggie right? Wrong.

Okay, remember how I was talking about drinking all that Hungarian wine while I made goulash? Well, while drinking said wine, I decided to place an order for lobsters. I was excited, I was drinking wine, I was multitasking prepping goulash and texting my lobster connect (yes, I have a lobster connect). Somehow, I managed to confuse $17 a pound with $17 a lobster and I ordered six lobsters. The recipe called for six lobsters. Well, these lobsters were gluttonous, radioactive, ginormous alien-like monsters that weighed several pounds each. When I arrived at the pre-established meet spot, my seafood dealer showed me the goods and I nodded in approval.

“Thanks for coming through my man.”

Then he shut the box, looked up at me and in slow motion said,” That’ll be $300.”

“Hahaha, for sure, no really how much?” He stares at me blankly. “Wait, you’re serious?”

“Yes, I’m serious, they’re like three pounds each.”

“Ummm, can I only have three?”

“No, you pre-ordered them, they’re alive, you have to take them.” I nodded sadly, forked over the dough and grabbed my nearly 20-pound box of live lobsters. It was a long shameful walk back to the car. The same almost thirty-year-old who still drives to her mom’s house so she doesn’t have to spend money on food just spent $300 on lobster. I called my brother, “We’re going to need to invite some people over tonight, I have enough lobster to feed 15 people.”

So, a New England Lobster Roll party ensued. We invited friends over and drank Cape Cod cocktails through to the wee hours of the morning. Everyone stood around and watched in horror as we threw the live lobsters in the pot. (I learned later there are more humane ways to do this). When all the lobsters were done, Jake and I retrieved all the usable meat (we watched a Gordon Ramsey YouTube video to learn how to do this best). No one talks about this part of cooking lobster by the way, because preparing lobster is atrocious: there were lobster guts, the pregnant lobsters had this blackish red goo that oozed and flung everywhere and there was lobster poop, not like the cute little vein that shrimp have, but really graphic lobster excrement.

Once the lobsters were cleaned, we chopped them up, threw them in the mixing bowl with the celery, spices and mayonnaise (we had to use store bought because we tried and failed twice at making Bourdain’s version) and then packed the delicious mixture into a hot dog bun. We passed the lobster rolls around to our family, friends and even the neighbor who’d wandered over to see what all the ruckus was about. They were a hit! Despite the murder, the guts and the gore, New England Lobster Roll Night was a success — one for the ages and with all things considered, worth every penny.

Cost: $336.41

Prep time: 4 hours-ish (Again, doesn’t need to take so long once you know what you’re doing.)

Level of Difficulty: 3.5 / 5

Level of Deliciousness: 4.2 / 5

Pro Tip: Do not drunk dial your lobster connect.

 

Day 4: Meatloaf with Mushroom Gravy

Meatloaf with Mushroom Gravy, Appetites Cookbook, Anthony Bourdain

Meatloaf sounds so 1950’s, so old-school “all-American family” — something I imagine June Cleaver preparing for Ward, Wally and Beaver for Sunday evening supper. Apparently, it originated in Germany and German immigrants brought the meat mashing recipe with them to colonial America. Since then, it’s graced the dinner tables, retro diner bar-tops and cafeteria trays of Americans from coast to coast.

I’ve never made meatloaf before and I’ve only tried it twice. The recipe wasn’t too daunting but the shopping list was more difficult to get through than one might think. Tracking down ground veal and even more scarce, veal stock, is no easy task. Jake was able to score some ground veal at a butcher shop a couple towns over but I was searching high and low for veal stock to no avail. “Make it yourself,” they said, but that’s a ton of cash that I already spent on lobster, so, after calling 50 places within a 50-mile radius I gave up and ordered some from Amazon.

We paired the meatloaf with Bourdain’s mushroom gravy and mashed potatoes and I must say, I was sincerely taken aback by how delectable and savory this was. The mushroom gravy itself was mouth-watering kind of good — addicting even. The secret to fantastic restaurant-grade cooking, Bourdain has said, is butter and shallots, and this recipe is ample with both. As for the likeliness of Jake or I making any of these dishes again, this one tops the list, along with the goulash.

Cost: $50.41

Prep time: 2 hours-ish

Level of Difficulty: 2.5 / 5

Level of Deliciousness: 4.8 / 5

Pro Tip: Pre-order your veal stock online so you’re not stuck searching for hours.

 

Day 5: Chicken Pot Pie

Chicken Pot Pie, Appetites Cookbook Anthony Bourdain

Jake and I, like our three other siblings, likely inherited our initial intrigue and inevitable adoration for Bourdain from our mom. She read Kitchen Confidential and passed it around, insisting her children read it too. She waited in line to have him sign her Les Halles Cookbook beaming and blushing while posing for a photo with him. Her eyes still well up with tears at the mere mention of him since his tragic passing last June. After decades of tirelessly preparing our family home-cooked gourmet meals, it seemed only right we invite her over and for us to do the heavy lifting this time around.

 Poaching chicken was a foreign concept to me but once I got past my own skepticism and lowered my eyebrow, I just followed the recipe exactly as I read it, and chicken really does cook while sitting in a covered pot removed from heat. The chopping wasn’t nearly as demanding as the goulash and our mom arrived just in time to stop me from ruining the crust with an itchy over-blending compulsion I’m currently dealing with.

Jake repeatedly instructed me to handle the crust, “Get going with the crust… Dude, make the crust!” But, I thought I should make it just before we rolled it out and laid it over the top. This was incorrect and has taught me to read an entire recipe from start to finish before each culinary endeavor. The crust dough needs to rest in the fridge for an hour before it is rolled out and placed over the pot pie’s savory goodness. This added unnecessary time and we didn’t eat until after 9 p.m. Apologies.

When we did sit down to eat the chicken pot pie, I was so excited for my mom, who can be appropriately characterized as a chicken pot pie connoisseur, to try it. I took dozens of photos of her taking bites of the dish, which was driving her nuts because who wants to be repeatedly photographed while eating, but landed us with this gem of a photo that will immortalize chicken pot pie night and serve as one of my favorite and I think most fitting photos of our fabulous and funny mom.  

Cost: $41.57

Prep time: 3 hours

Level of Difficulty: 3.5 / 5

Level of Deliciousness: 4.4 / 5

Pro Tip: Make the dough ahead of time so it can rest in the fridge, do not over blend your dough and invite your mom over and feed her for once!

 

Day 6: Mutant Quesadillas: Chorizo and Duck

Duck and Chorizo Quesadillas Appetites Cookbook Anthony Bourdain

We chose this recipe because we wanted a good excuse to pair something with margaritas. These are not chorizo and duck quesadillas like I initially assumed, they are duck and goat cheese quesadillas and then chorizo and Monterey Jack cheese quesadillas. Two separate types of quesadillas with some yummy homemade pico de gallo on the side. Which one was better? It’s difficult to say because they were like apples and oranges, both delicious but completely different.

The duck had to be purchased at the butcher shop a couple towns over and salted the night before we made them. The prep on the day of wasn’t overly intensive, they were actually relatively simple to make and the duck was ridiculously tasty. Paired with the goat cheese, it felt like quite the decadent quesadilla.

If you’re looking for something simple to prepare, inexpensive yet flavorful, and have a large group of people to feed, go for the chorizo quesadillas. If you’re feeling a tad pretentious, don’t mind the extra effort (and the added expense) and have a smaller group of friends to impress, go for the duck and goat cheese. If you’re feeling like Anthony Bourdain — make both! These quesadillas were easy peasy, certainly gratifying and turned out to be an excellent excuse for margaritas.  

Cost: $67.78

Prep time: 1 hour 45 minutes

Level of Difficulty: 2 / 5

Level of Deliciousness: 4.2 / 5

Pro Tip: Make sure you’re prepared and buy the duck ahead of time so you can salt the night before.

 

Day 7: Osso Bucco with Saffron Risotto

Osso Buco with Saffron Risotto, Anthony Bourdain Appetites Cookbook

We saved the fanciest dish for last. Osso Bucco calls for veal shanks, which we scored only one town over at a little Italian market, Claro’s. We also grabbed the carnaroli rice for the risotto there. Salt, pepper, a little flour and then we plopped the veal into some hot oil to sear both sides. Afterwards, we threw it into the pot of wine and veggie brew and let it simmer for three hours. We prepared the risotto a ladle full of saffron stock at a time and for the first time in my life, I seemed to have timed it perfectly —  both the risotto and the braised veal were ready to be served at the same time.

I’m not sure if by day seven we were such cooking pros that we could conquer any recipe Bourdain threw our way or if making Osso Bucco isn’t nearly as challenging as I assumed it would be, but it was pretty easy! Time-consuming, sure, but really quite simple. We paired the Osso Bucco with negronis because they were one of Bourdain’s favorite cocktails. The first few sips were bitter and made me shudder a bit, but they grow on you.

When we sat down to eat our last Bourdain recipe, after an exhausting but very special seven days of cooking, we clinked glasses with our negronis and dug into a very lavish, fall-off-the-bone, fabulous dish of Osso Bucco and saffron risotto.

Cost: $104.95

Prep time: 3.5 hours

Level of Difficulty: 2.2 / 5

Level of Deliciousness: 4.6 / 5

Pro Tip: Pair this dish with negronis and pour some out for our man Tony Bourdain.

 

The most valuable thing I learned throughout this cooking-like-Bourdain endeavor is that cooking doesn’t have to feel so intimidating. For regular people who usually just throw together a mediocre meal for their family, like me, it can be daunting and overwhelming to peruse a cookbook. The ingredient list may look too long or the steps too intensive, but once you do it, it’s miraculous how it all seems to come together in the end. Not to mention the pride and satisfaction that comes with your family providing a soundtrack to your dinner filled with “mmmm’s” and “aaah’s.”

 

A note from my big brother and crucial cooking partner-in-crime Jake:   

Bourdain showed us that food has the power to bring countries and cultures together if we are brave and open-minded, but it will also bring families together. The time we’ve spent cooking and doing this adventure has been such a blessing and so much fun.  Our kids play and our spouses complain while we bond and cook in the kitchen, and when it’s all said and done, we all sit together and enjoy the food. It’s not just exploring the world, because you can explore relationships and experiences in new ways as close as your own kitchen, enjoying the ones you love the most.

Anthony Bourdain Appetites Cookbook

To follow more adventures and see more pictures, please follow Emily on Twitter @MissEdSullivan or Instagram @edsullivan2 and Jake on Instagram @jakex3g.

Categories
Cravings

Massive 50 Pound Ramen Bowl Is Topped With An Entire Ostrich Egg

A hearty bowl of ramen has the power to cure any hunger pangs, and warm even the coldest of moods. There will always be a place in my heart for the savory Japanese noodle dish, and for all the ramen lovers out there, you never forget your first 50-pound bowl.

Yes, you read that right: A 50-pound ramen bowl.

Photo by Peter Pham/Foodbeast

The Institute of Culinary Education in Pasadena, California, created a massive 50-pound bowl of ramen in celebration of Foodbeast hitting the 5 million follower milestone on Facebook.

Inside the generous helping was more than 30 to 40 pounds of authentic ramen noodles and an ocean of tonkotsu broth made from pig trotters, pork fatback, and chicken bones.

“In the actual broth, we char scallions, ginger, garlic, onions, and leeks,” explained chef Leicel Ros, an instructor at the Institute who constructed the dish. “For an extra layer of earthiness and umami, we did whole mushrooms. We used shiitake mushrooms and button mushrooms.”

Flavors of the broth were developed for 24 hours prior to serving through an intricate process.

Photo by Peter Pham/Foodbeast

To complete the colossal ramen bowl aesthetic, the dish was topped with an entire ostrich egg.

“If you think about it, you’re just cooking a giant egg that’s the size equivalent to at least 24 chicken eggs,” she laughed. “It’s a very thick shell, so we boiled it in a large pot in rapidly boiling water from 50 minutes to an hour.”

The extravagant dish touched upon Chef Ros’s passion of developing flavors meticulously with patience and care.

“Honestly, there’s a lot of love that goes into each component,” she shared. “I think the magic happens when everything combines into one plate.

Photo by Peter Pham/Foodbeast

With a project of this scale, Chef Ros had to be extra attentive to make sure every single step of the dish was done correctly and carefully.

“Time is the most important ingredient that we have as chefs, and we can’t buy time,” she stated. “If there was anything we were low on, we can buy it back, but there’s no replacement for time.”

The bowl held enough broth, noodles, and protein to serve nearly 100 hungry people.

While this unique experience was created specifically for Foodbeast, the Institute offers a plethora of experiences they can put together for you and your special occasions. If you’re looking to book a food adventure of your own, check out the Institute’s special event page and see what you can create with a love of food and some imagination.

Photo by Peter Pham/Foodbeast
Categories
Hacks

5 Bad Cooking Habits We’ve Picked Up That Need To Be Shed

Photo: So Delicious

Nobody on this Earth was born knowing exactly how to chop vegetables, whisk eggs, or brown meat. But somehow, almost all of us have some bad cooking habits that we’ve picked up in our lives. It’s time to get rid of them and reach the next cooking level.

How do we learn how to cook anyway? If you think about it, it’s a skill that grows over time. It begins with watching our caregivers do that and we sort of absorb the lessons, the movements, and sometimes we can reproduce them without even thinking. Or our caregivers are great enough to put the ingredients in our hands and teach us by doing. Or, these days, maybe we might learn from watching a ‘how to’ video on YouTube (or who knows? Maybe even on this site).

But with this sort of learning, more often than not, we pick up valuable knowledge and also one or two bad cooking habits that we carry with us. Sometimes maybe even pass them on to friends, roommates and future generations. This has a high chance of happening since cooking myths are dispelled all the time. Here is what you should stop doing when cooking.

5 bad cooking habits to let go

1. Cooking foods with extra virgin olive oil at high temps

Not all cooking oils are used for the same techniques in the kitchen. For reference, check out this guide for cooking oils. The main differences come from the ability of different oils to withstand high temperatures, or as it’s more famously called – the smoke point of oils.

In the grand scheme of things, extra virgin olive oil has one of the lowest smoke points among its brethren. That means it’s extremely dangerous to cook with it at high temperatures. So don’t! Because it destroys nutrients and creates harmful free radicals. Use your magnificent oil for making salad dressing or a simple sauté.

Bad Cooking Habits to Shed for a Fresh StartExtra virgin olive oil is better used without applying too much heat.

2. Boiling veggies

This list of bad cooking habits is full of things we do very often, without thinking. Take boiling vegetables: it seems simple to add them to a pot of water and let them boil, right? Well, what you make up for in time, you definitely lose in nutrients, not to mention ever-important texture and taste. How much do you lose? About 40-50 percent of nutrients – it depends what your veggies are rich in. The longer your food cooks at a high temperature, the more the nutrient waste. So what can you do about that? Try blanching! This means boiling the veggies briefly and then transferring them to a bowl of ice water. This ensures that your veggies don’t turn to mush and you benefit from their nutritional profile to the fullest. Find out here how to do it.

3. Thawing meat in the sink

This is definitely not a good idea, because bacteria tend to grow on the meat when it’s at room temperature. And I think that nobody is ever willing to risk food poisoning or a foodborne illness. So instead of doing this in your sink, try to be a bit more organized. Remove your meat from the freezer the night before, place it on a plate and let it thaw out in the refrigerator overnight. Don’t leave it close to produce though and make sure that it won’t leak over them.

Bad Cooking Habits to Shed for a Fresh StartYour meat should be thawed in the refrigerator, to keep you safe.

4. Keeping oils near heat

Want to know what’s the quickest way to make your cooking oils go rancid? The answer might surprise you. It’s all about keeping them near any source of heat. So if you’re keeping your olive oil, canola oil or vegetable oil near the stove so that you can use them while cooking, then you should definitely stop doing that. Rancid oil not only tastes way worse, but it also promotes inflammation, according to some nutritionists. But remember, we said keeping them near heat, so if there’s direct sunlight on them, that’s not good either and you should change it. Instead, store your oils in a cool and dry place, for a longer shelf life.

5. Peeling your produce

That sometimes seems to be the first step when you start prepping your meals, right? Well, actually… We have to say that there are too many nutrients in the skins of your fruit and vegetables to let them go to waste. Often, the skin is actually the richest in vitamins, minerals, and healthy compounds. So just make sure you wash the produce thoroughly and then cook the fruits and vegetables with it still attached. This way you’ll also get more dietary fiber, for a greater and healthier digestion process. Not to mention you save some time like that!

Related Links:


Article by Ruxandra Grecu from So Delicious. View the original article here.

Categories
Celebrity Grub Restaurants

Jose Andres Thinks The Term ‘Molecular Gastronomy’ Is Useless

Today, the term “molecular gastronomy” carries with it a sort of culinary mystique. It refers to the blend of science and food in a fine dining restaurant setting, where folks like Jose Andres and Grant Achatz create mesmerizing concoctions never seen before.

With that magical feel and fine dining appeal has come an air of pretentiousness that’s surrounded the term, and it’s something that Andres has not become a fan of. In fact, he feels that “molecular gastronomy” doesn’t really have any meaning to begin with.

Jose AndresPhoto: USDA on Flickr // CC 4.0

Andres gave his take on what “molecular gastronomy” really meant when he sat down on a recent episode of NPR’s Fresh Air podcast.

“Listen to me, people of America,” he said, “EVERYTHING is molecular. When you drink wine… when you drink beer… when you eat cheese… when your food gets rotten… your pickles, that’s molecular. Everything is molecular, what has happened is that before, we were clueless. We didn’t know why things happened.”

“Now we have knowledge, which makes you powerful,” Andres added. “That’s what gives you the power to do better food, more tasty food, and that’s the way forward. More knowledge in the hands of chefs, and people will be helping us to feed the world better.”

The term “molecular gastronomy” is useless to Andres because its most accurate definition, and the one he abides by, is literally cooking or eating molecules. AKA, what we do to food every single day.

For Andres, his work, or what most people call “molecular gastronomy,” is the next step in the evolution of cooking techniques. Every time he or someone else develops a new way to prepare food, it will eventually spread and become more common especially in today’s day and age. I mean, look at where sous vide is now versus the niche status of it not even a decade ago. There’s also the Instant Pot, which effectively commercialized the once chef-exclusive technique of pressure cooking. Don’t forget about liquid nitrogen, which has become the freezing material of choice for ice cream and is the basis of the now-popular “dragon’s breath” challenge.

It is the rise of these technologies and scientific advances in food that’s helped humanity accelerate. Think about where we would be today if canning didn’t exist. How space travel would have proved useless without the freeze-dried foods astronauts needed for nourishment. Or even how to create a stable mayonnaise that won’t split on you within a couple of hours.

Andres understands the work that he, Achatz, and other so-called “molecular gastronomists” do, could have huge impacts on the future of food. As pretentious as the name may be, we’ll eventually be using at least some of their techniques in our everyday food as well.

Categories
Design Products Recipes

Universal Cookbook Teaches You Recipes Without Any Words

James Beard once said that “Food is a common ground. A universal experience.” Whether or not you speak the same tongue, it’s safe to say that anyone can enjoy a well-cooked meal made from the soul.

As a innovative way to bridge communication barriers when sharing recipes, a Kickstarter campaign has begun for the Look Cook Book — the first cookbook created in a universal language.

The idea behind the cookbook is to be able to share recipes between anyone regardless of dialect through the use of minimalistic imagery and directions.

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Each recipe features an icon with the ingredient, its measurements, the action needed, and process time for that action. Honestly, it’s pretty quick to pick up — even at a glance. Recipes include Cheesecake, Risotto, Sesame Chicken, Paneer Saag, and Thai Chicken, with the dishes ranging across several levels of difficulty.

The recipes are also designed so that they can be made for under $1.50 a portion.

As of this writing, the campaign has reached $2,709 out of their $5,465 goal. If funded, the Look Cook Book will be available in both paperback and interactive digital form.

Those looking to fund the Look Cook Book can find out more information on the campaign page.