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Fast Food News Plant-Based Sustainability What's New

KFC Will Be Selling Plant-Based Chicken Nuggets In China Next Week

On Monday, KFC announced that it will be selling vegan chicken nuggets in China from April 28 to April 30, as it continues its expansion into the plant-based market.

The fast food giant said that the nuggets will be sold in Shanghai, Shenzhen, and Guangzhou, and will be manufactured by Cargill Ltd. 

This comes after extremely successful plant-based product testing in multiple countries, which showed enough consumer demand to expand the dishes into more locations in the US. Notably, the company is using a different manufacturer for the Chinese launch, as they tapped Beyond Meat in the US and Lightlife in Canada, respectively.

This isn’t the only way in which the brand’s Chinese release differs. Customers will have to purchase a pre-sale voucher for 1.99 yuan that entitles them to five chicken pieces, according to the company’s official Weibo account. 

This is an interesting path to take, as KFC surely looks to avoid the expansive line that occurred during the high profile Atlanta launch of the company’s plant-based fried chicken. It’s reminiscent of the pre-sale lotteries and raffles that many sneaker companies have done to avoid real-life lines and online crashes during hyped shoe releases. 

We’ll surely be keeping our eyes peeled for any visuals of the new nuggets, as well as any potential plant-based nugget voucher resale market, so check back soon.

Categories
Fast Food Health What's New

Pieology’s New Protein-Packed Crust Is Made From Chicken

In 2019, Pieology made Foodbeast’s list of fast food “game changers” because it began offering up six different pizza crusts that catered to all types of diets and cravings.

For 2020, Pieology decided to add a new crust to its arsenal that’s perfect for those looking to stock up on protein or practice a keto lifestyle. That new crust is predominantly made with chicken breast.

Pizza image courtesy of Pieology

Called the Protein Style Chicken Base, Pieology’s seventh crust addition comes amidst an increased interest in eating the keto diet. A standard base, upon which you can add whatever toppings and sauces you want, contains 44 grams of protein, 280 calories, and 2 grams of carbs. The crust, which was created in partnership with Foster Farms, is also keto-certified.

Pieology’s newest offering also capitalizes on the popularity of chicken as a pizza base. In 2019, viral New York pizza sensation Krave It created a Nashville Hot chicken crust that exploded on the internet, garnering over 2 million views. Other grocery store brands, like Real Good Pizza, have also introduced chicken pizza crusts in the past and found success.

No other major pizza chain has debuted a crust made with protein like this before, making Pieology the first to innovate at scale in this space.

You can find the Protein Style Chicken Base at Pieology locations nationwide, with the exception of restaurants in Hawaii.

Categories
News What's New

Hooters Is Giving Out Free Wings to Single People on Valentine’s Day

Most Valentine’s Days spent single are passed in a concentrated effort to forget your ex but, on this year’s Valentine’s Day, Hooters is asking for your remembrance of what was.

On February 14th, during the yearly reminder of our societal obligation to companionship, Hooters is offering up the chance to get 10 free boneless wings. The only condition is you must bring in a picture of your former significant other to be shredded, because people still shred pictures like it’s a mid-2000’s lowbrow romcom, evidently.

But, if you’re living in 2020 like the rest of us, and your photo library is on your phone or computer, you can digitally shred your ex as well. You’ll be presented with a voucher you can use to redeem your chicken nuggets — er, boneless wings, excuse me.

Unfortunately, a rather difficult dilemma faces you after your former flame has been extinguished and 10 boneless wings are in your possession: Do you squad up with all the other people who decided to go to Hooters on Valentine’s Day or do you go home and eat your Hooters wings alone while solemnly curled up on the couch? Both are equally as existential crisis triggering but, hey, at least you’ll have ten free wings, right?

Right?

Categories
Fast Food

Long John Silver’s Just Became ALL YOU CAN EAT This Thanksgiving Week

Fans of Long John Silver’s fast-food style seafood spread will have something to give thanks for this week. The chain announced that during Thanksgiving week, they’ll be offering an All-You-Can-Eat special at participating locations in celebration of the food-filled holiday.

Starting now through Nov. 30, customers can dive into all the fish, chicken, and sides they can eat for about $7.99.

This includes hand-battered wild-caught Alaska Pollock, fried white-meat chicken tenders, fries, coleslaw, and LJS’s famous hush puppies.

Not going to lie, I’d go just for endless hush puppies alone.

Long John Silver’s AYCE special will be from 11am through 7pm until the end of the month. Not all locations will honor this deal, however, so best check this store locator to find out exactly which ones you can hit to get your fried seafood fix.

Categories
Food Festivals News Restaurants What's New

This New Food Festival Is an Ode to the Chicken Strip

Chicken tender fanatics often live out their passion in silence. The dish can draw some serious side-eyes if ordered for dinner during a night out. Once the age has passed where “being picky” is a legitimate excuse for not wanting to try new menu items, the childhood favorite is usually reserved for the occasional bar order or desperate fast food buy. But, those crunchy breaded chicken strips are loved by most for a reason — they’re easily made and moldable to just about any profile. 

Later this month in Los Angeles, tenders will be getting the recognition they deserve, when Off the Menu and John Terzian of the H.Wood Group will be teaming up to throw the city’s first TenderFest at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts on November 15. The festival aims to show off the tender’s full potential by bringing together some of the area’s top chicken vendors, including Delilah, Fuku, Raising Cane’s, Hot Mutha Clucker, CAULIPOWER, and Gus’s World Famous Fried Chicken.

Additionally, famed chefs Nancy Silverton, Wolfgang Puck, Chris Oh, and Timothy Hollingsworth will each be crafting their interpretation of a tender to serve in front of a panel of judges. The winner of this showdown will be gifted a cash prize to give to a charity of their choice. 

Tickets for TenderFest are available now for $65, which pays for unlimited tenders and beer. The VIP tickets, which run for $175, also include the food and booze, as well as event merchandise, a VIP lounge, access to VIP-only vendor Dave’s Hot Chicken, a gift bag, and a 6 month membership to Off the Menu.

Off the Menu has been throwing dope food-focused events for a while now, and is a consistent source for innovative and creative flavors, which stands out in a Southern California culinary universe that can tend to stagnate on flavor-of-the-month trends. 

Categories
#foodbeast Cravings Food Trends Restaurants

Korean Fried Chicken Is Ready For the Mainstream

What’s all the hoopla over KFC? No, not that KFC, I’m talking about Korean fried chicken, which is letting it be known it’s not just a substitute for American fried chicken, but is its own thing entirely. Spots like Momofuku Ko, Bonchon Chicken, The Gangjung and OG KFC franchise, Pelicana Chicken, are only a few that have made a name on the food scene. They’re waving the banner high for other established joints like The Prince and Kyochon, who have held it down in Los Angeles’ Koreatown neighborhood for years. Ever heard of quadruple fried chicken? I hadn’t either. But before we dive into South Korea’s take on fried chicken, let me give ya’ll a little background.

Established in 1977 in the basement of Seoul’s Shinsegae Department Store, the first modern-day Korean fried chicken joint was called “Lims Chicken.” As the first fried chicken franchise in South Korea, Lims became extremely popular amongst locals who were used to eating chicken boiled with rice and ginseng. The restaurant employed a cooking method that involves frying the chicken twice, thus creating a version of fried chicken that was thinner and crispier than its American counterpart. As the demand for fried chicken in Korea grew, it was the arrival of Pelicana Chicken in 1982 that really changed the game. 

Photo by: National Institute of Korean Language on WikiCommons, CC BY-SA 2.0 KR

Pelicana created what we know today as Korean fried chicken by being the first to drench it in sweet and spicy sauce. This approach is popularly referred to as “yangnyeom (seasoned) chicken,” and was a driving stimulus behind future innovations on the KFC scene.

Evolving as the years progressed, today there are four flavors and three styles of Korean fried chicken available for chicken lovers. “Dankganjeong” is the most traditional flavor of KFC, and is considered by some to be the Korean version of orange chicken. It’s fried twice using potato or corn starch mixed with seasoning, and glazed with a sweet garlic soy sauce. One LA-based restaurant that’s fittingly named and known for their dankganjeong is The Gangjung. They offer an array of flavors from garlic to barbeque. Out east in New York, modern Korean soul food gastropub, Windrose, provides an upscale presentation using a cloche as a makeshift smoker that when removed reveals glistening dankganjeong.

Another flavor is “padak,” which means “green onion-chicken.” It’s plain fried chicken smothered with slivers of fresh green onions. Palisades Park, NJ hot spot MaMa Chicken features generous portions of padak on their menu along with a range of options to keep your taste satisfied.

For the humble palate there’s plain ol’ fried chicken, which is named “huraideu.” David Chang’s famous Monofuku Ko has what is called “Fried Chicken But Cold,” which is exactly what you think. The prestige lies in the quadruple fried skin which maintains its crispiness even after refrigeration.

The other two KFC styles are “sunsal,” meaning “boneless” and “tongdak,” which means “whole chicken.” Lims Chicken originally popularized tongdak in the 1970s. It’s made by submerging a whole chicken into a fryer until it’s extra crispy, and is then served rotisserie style. 

Photo by: happy o’ne on WikiCommons, CC By 2.0 KR

As you can see, there’s a KFC style for every mood. Fried chicken will always be a comfort food staple and as Korean fried chicken continues to gain mainstream popularity, you can expect more unique approaches.

Next time you’re trying to decide how to appease your munchies after a night of partying, be sure to type “Korean fried chicken near me,” into your search engine.

Categories
News What's New

The Curious Supersititon That Kept Koreans From Eating Chicken Wings

Southern. Chinese. Korean. Nashville. There are more kinds of fried chicken on this Earth than one mere human could ever hope to try in one proper sitting.

“Korean chicken wings are some of the best,” The Katchup co-host Elie Ayrouth remarked to fellow co-host Geoffrey Kutnick and guest Lawrence Longo on the most recent episode of the podcast.

It’s hard to argue with him, too. Famous for their ultra crispy double fried breading and juicy meat, Korean chicken wings are indeed some of the world’s best.

That’s why it’s that much more surprising to find out that there’s a superstition in the Korean culture that warns people against eating these double fried delicacies. 

According to Longo, “The Korean culture, 500 years ago, didn’t let their husbands eat the chicken wing.” 

Turns out, it’s true. 

Korea.net confirms that in the Korean culture, there’s a superstition that says a wife should not feed her husband chicken wings because then he will “fly away” and cheat on her. One site, KoreanClass101, suggests that this could be because the Korean word for wind is “바람” which, funny enough, is also Korean for “affair.” 

So if a chicken can be gone with the wind, apparently so could this fictional husband when he’s done eating said chicken. Or maybe it’s a coincidence?

Either way, find out more about this tidbit (gristle, if you will), L.A’s first Wing Fest, and everything else chicken wing by listening to the latest version of The Katchup, right here

Categories
Hacks

How To Bake Chicken Breasts Without Drying Them Out

Photo: Oksan Shurfych//Shutterstock

Learn how to bake chicken breasts that are so juicy and tender, you’ll want to make them every night of the week.

When it comes to dinner, there’s nothing easier, or more versatile, than boneless skinless chicken breasts. You can grill themslow cook thempan-fry them and even cook them in a pressure cooker. But my go-to has always been baked chicken breasts.

Despite best efforts, sometimes baked chicken can come out dry, tough and unappetizing. Luckily, Taste of Home’s Test Kitchen has come up with a baking method that results in tender and juicy chicken breasts each and every time. Keep reading for the simple step-by-step instructions.

What temperature should I bake chicken breasts?

Our Test Kitchen has found that baking chicken at a higher temperature, 425°F, locks in the chicken’s moisture and gives you a really juicy chicken breast. As an added bonus, cooking at such a high temp means that the chicken only has to bake for 15-20 minutes depending on the thickness, so you can get dinner on the table in a flash.

PsstHere are 7 mistakes to avoid when cooking chicken.

How to Bake Chicken Breasts

Ingredients:

  • 4 boneless skinless chicken breast halves (about 4 ounces each)
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Directions

Step 1: Prep the chicken

To start, brine your chicken in a mixture of water and a few tablespoons of salt for about 20-30 minutes. This will boost the natural flavor and moisture of the chicken breasts and will leave you with a super tender piece of meat. If you’re still not convinced, check out everything you need to know about brining here.

Step 2: Season the chicken

When your chicken is done brining, drain the brine and blot the chicken breasts completely dry with a paper towel. Then, brush with olive oil and sprinkle on the salt, pepper and any additional seasonings. In need of some inspiration? Here are our favorite baked chicken recipes.

Test Kitchen Tip: If your chicken breasts are very thick on one end and not on the other, you’ll want to pound them with a meat mallet until the breast has an even thickness. This helps the chicken cook evenly. A small skillet or saucepan can also be used if you don’t have a meat mallet on hand.

Step 3: Bake

Transfer the chicken breasts to a greased baking dish or sheet pan and pop it into a 425° oven. Allow the chicken to bake uncovered for 15-20 minutes, or until the internal temperature reaches 165°.

Pro tip: The temperature of the chicken is important, under 165° puts you at risk of foodborne illnesses and over 165° will be dry and tough, be sure to use a reliable thermometer, like ThermoWork’s Thermapen.

Step 4: Rest

Once the chicken gets up to temperature, remove the breasts from the oven and let them rest for about 5 minutes or so. This lets the juices redistribute in the chicken, locking in the moisture so it doesn’t spill out once it’s cut.

And that’s it! Serve with these tender and juicy chicken breasts with your favorite side dishes or on top of a fresh salad and dinner is ready to be served.

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Article by Caroline Stanko for Taste of Home. View the original article here.