Categories
#foodbeast Cravings Features Video

Lamb Korma Pizza Pushes Pie Fusions Into Delicious Creativity

Already known for their prowess in marrying Indian flavors with Italian cuisine (butter chicken calzone WHAT), Superkhana in Chicago, Illinois has another ace up their sleeve with a lamb korma pizza that’s a must have. It all starts with a velvety korma gravy, which is an Indian dish that has meat or veggies braised with yogurt or cream. The star protein on this pie is savory lamb in meatball form, a perfect topping to the fusion fever dream that this pizza is. Throw on some pecorino and mozzarella and destination nirvana complete.

This creation from chefs Yoshi Yamada, Zeeshan Shah, and Jason Hammel is further proof that the blank canvas of pizza dough can lay ground for an endless list of creative modern takes on all kinds of dishes from global cuisines. So here’s to blurring borders and linking eager palates together through the burning curiosity of chefs that choose to push the boundaries of creative cooking. More often than not, the results are a delectable hit – just ask anyone who has tried Superkhana’s lamb korma pizza.

Categories
News What's New

The Eleven Regional Hot Dogs Everyone Needs In Their Life

There aren’t many things on this green earth that unify, and simultaneously drive apart, Americans quite like hot dogs, besides maybe politics and the NFL (which may as well be the same thing at this point, much to the chagrin of “Stick to Sports” Twitter). Hot dogs are universal in the sense that they’re consumed at every corner of the country. They’re also quite divisive, in that each region has their own spin on the mystery sausage, and which one is the best is a oft-debated subject.

Cities and states lay claim to hot dogs like BBQ and famous nightclubs. The Chicago dog, Dodger dog, Seattle-style dog, Detroit dog — all delicacies that locals will fiercely defend to their graves.

In truth, most of these dogs are remarkably similar: dog, buns, onions, peppers, cheese, and some kind of sauce. The attachment lies in the intrinsic pride that comes with the down-home origin story of each dog, most of which were long ago enough to not be quite remembered, as well as memories of better days and sleepless nights spent with friends stumbling into a hot dog vendor at just the right time.

One such cherished hot dog is Detroit’s Coney Island dog, which combines a Dearborn Sausage Company hot dog with beanless chili, a hit of mustard, chopped raw onions, and, of course, a helping of shredded cheddar cheese. These dogs are a part of the city’s culinary backbone, a place where a preference between local landmark American Coney Island or it’s next-door counterpart Lafayette can strain friendships. 

A few days ago, on Foodbeast’s podcast, The Katchup, hosts Elie Ayrouth and Geoffrey Kutnick were joined by Chris Sotiropoulos, the owner of American Coney Island to discuss the creation of the Detroit’s esteemed Coney Island Dogs. The company’s recent expansion to Las Vegas gives West Coaster’s the chance to try a regional dog that would be otherwise unobtainable. With the Coney fresh on our mind, the Foodbeast office began to think of other specialty dogs out there that we haven’t tried. 

So, we hit the streets and found eleven hometown favorites that we wish we could try, and here they are:

Sonoran Style

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by MUNCHIES (@munchies) on

The Sonoran hot dog starts with a frank wrapped in crispy bacon. Created in Tucson, AZ, the dog pays homage to the city’s Latino roots by using a split soft roll called a bolillo, and topping that with pinto beans, chopped tomatoes, diced onions, creamy mayo, mustard, and jalapeños. 

Chicago Style

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Alex Jewell, Chicago Food (@bestfoodalex) on

Maybe one of the most famous options on this list, the Chicago-style dog is as much a staple to the city as its biting wind. It uses a steamed Vienna sausage all-beef dog, which is then placed in a steamed poppy seed bun, and painted with the bright colors of tomato slices, sport peppers, dill pickle, chopped raw onion, relish, celery salt, and a drizzle of bright yellow mustard.

Scrambled Dog

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Southern Soul Barbeque (@southernsoulbbq) on

The Scrambled Dog was born in Columbus, GA 72 years ago, the brainchild of the late Lieutenant Stevens. This beast of a plate starts with a soft bun, then Stevens’ fresh chili, cut up weiners, more chili, raw onions, dill pickle slices, and a heaping handful of crunchy oyster crackers. 

Seattle Style Dog

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Bruiser’s Dogs (@bruisersdogs) on

A Seattle-style hot dog consists of a grilled, split frank, nestled on a toasted bun that’s been smothered in cream cheese, grilled onions and, often, jalapeños. It makes sense that these are typically eaten during late nights out, because it sounds like something I would make with some potluck leftovers at 2AM.

Tater Pig

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Sweet Pea Festival (@sweetpeafestival) on

This… is what it sounds like. A specialty of the Twin Falls County Fair, this monstrosity does just enough to constitute as a hot dog. Really, it’s a sausage. And it’s stuffed inside of a baked potato. Hence, the tater pig. 

Polish Boy

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Las Vegas Foodie (@lasvegas_foodie) on

Cleveland’s late night sausage of choice is a grilled kielbasa (a sausage broadly described as “any type of meat sausage from Poland.” Thanks Wikipedia). Place one of these guys on a sturdy bun, and top it with a handful of fries, coleslaw, BBQ sauce, as well as hot sauce, and you have yourself a Polish Boy.

Dodger Dog

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Armando (@r_m4ndo) on

Los Angeles’ Chavez Ravine favorite has both steamed and grilled variations. Either way, the result is a ten-inch pork hot dog embraced in an equally as long bun, marked with relish, mustard, ketchup, and chopped raw onions. 

Carolina Style

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Willie’s Burgers (@williesburgers) on

This version of the hot dog is popular amongst much of the Southeast United States. Beginning with an all-beef frank stuffed in a soft bun, it’s then covered in chili and piled high with coleslaw. Most people like to add mustard as well, to offset the sweetness of the slaw and savoriness of the chili.

New York Dog

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Grace Stewart (@explore_cook_eat) on

Contrary to every other aspect of their lives, New Yorkers like to keep their hot dogs simple. Strictly boiled in water of mysterious circumstances on a street cart, these dogs are topped with only mustard and sauerkraut for buyers to quickly shove down.

Italian Dog

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Simply Rockin (@simply_rockin) on

The answer to every New Jerseyan’s hangover, this dog originated in Newark. Here, bakers make plush loaves of pizza bread, which are like massive pizza crusts. After being split open, the bread is stuffed with a lightly fried dog, onions, peppers, and more deep-fried potatoes than can fit.

Tijuana Dog

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by ⓃⒶⓃⒹⓄ’Ⓢ ⒷⒶⒿⒶ ⒹⓄⒼⓈ (@nandosbajadogs) on

The Tijuana dog, though named after the town in Mexico in which it originates, gained it’s fame off the streets of L.A. Sold largely from street carts outside of sports games and clubs, this dog is wrapped in bacon and fried until crispy and snappy. It’s tossed into a soft bun and then served with grilled onions and peppers, mayo, mustard, ketchup, and sometimes a grilled jalapeño to give it some kick.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Butter Chicken Calzone Is The International Mash-Up We All Deserve

Butter chicken, an Indian dish, is considered a favorite by many and owes its universal appeal to it’s creamy, indulgent sauce that enrobes tender chunks of chicken. Also, butter and chicken — it’s a name that invokes mouth-watering visions of each item somehow coming together beautifully.

Now imagine it suddenly becoming hand-held, ready at your fingertips for many convenient bites. Superkhana in Chicago, Illinois somehow made this a possibility by incorporating an Italian twist — make it a calzone. It’s wild on paper, but if you think about it, a calzone serves as the perfect vessel for the golden goodness of butter chicken.

Born from the imagination of Chefs Yoshi Yamada, Zeeshan Shah, and Jason Hammel, the butter chicken calzone represents the modern takes on Indian cuisine that Superkhana hangs its hat on. Through unique avenues of technique and application, Superkhana has become a Chicago hotspot in the short time its been open, one where homage to traditional dishes is shown through a modern lens. In short, the restaurant is celebrating both Indian and American cuisine through innovation rooted in a mastery of core cooking principles.

Categories
#foodbeast FOODBEAST Packaged Food Restaurants SPONSORED

Chicago’s Doggone Is Now Making a Hidden Valley Ranch Creole Hot Dog with Shrimp Etouffée

There’s no shortage of hot dogs in Chicago, so much so that the city has its own distinct “Chicago-style hot dog.” To be able to shout over all that noise, hot dog joints have to make something truly special. That’s exactly what Doggone, the brainchild of hot dog entrepreneur Skip Murray, is trying to do with their delectable dogs for the Coast 2 Coast Ranch tour, presented by Hidden Valley ® Ranch.

Undoubtedly inspired by his hometown of New Orleans, where Murray’s first restaurant, Dat Dog, blew up, the Cool Bayou dog is made from a mix of crawfish and pork. This down south dog is then coated in Hidden Valley Ranch Original Seasoning and allowed to marinate.

Next, the dog is cooked and then covered with a creamy shrimp étouffée. In French, étouffée means “smothered,” so sure enough, this dog is absolutely drowning in the Cajun classic.

Fresh diced tomatoes and diced onions are then added to balance out the hearty étouffée and the dog.

But all the delicious fun doesn’t stop there. Once the solid toppings are set, creole mustard is drizzled on top. The dog is then finished with a Hidden Valley Original Ranch Seasoning-infused sour cream and a sprinkle of parsley.

For all the Chicagoan Foodbeasts out there with a serious love for ranch, this dog will be available all September in celebration of the quintessential dressing. If you want to find more ways to try ranch, no worries. Just take a trip to foodbeast.com/ranch and check out the other participating locations of the Hidden Valley Coast 2 Coast Tour.


Created in partnership with Hidden Valley Ranch. 

Categories
News Pop-Ups What's New

You Can Now Book The Oscar Mayer Weinermobile As An AirBNB

Oscar Mayer, for the first time ever, is opening up the doors to the Weinermobile for people other than the lucky few who get to drive the thing and hold the elusive “Hotdogger” title.

The weiner company is teaming up with AirBNB to offer people the chance to book a stay in the world’s favorite, and only, weiner-shaped car. From August 1st through August 3rd, the vehicle, which is parked outside of Everston, IL, can be had for $136 a night.

The 27-foot-long Weinermobile comes fully stocked with a mini-fridge full of hotdogs, all the Chicago-style fixings, an Oscar Mayer roll away grill (that you can keep!), and an outside seating area.

It’s also fitted with a roll-out bed, two seats made out of ketchup red velvet and mustard yellow leather, and windows aplenty. With all these amenities, the van is sure to make a cozy stay for the weekend. It’s #VanLife, but with hot dogs.

If that’s not enough, it also comes with a variety of wearable goodies, like a hot dog onesie. 

According to the internet, the running price for a package of the Oscar Mayer weiners is around $3. Going by my rudimentary math skills, in order to get your money’s worth, you only have to eat… 453 hot dogs. 

That sounds feasible, especially for anybody who’s such a fan of hot dogs that they’re willing to sleep in a giant one on wheels for a night. 

Unfortunately, if you’re looking for that experience, it’s to the store you go. That’s because the  Weinermobile is all booked up, after just 24 hours on the market. 

Hopefully, there will be more openings in the future, so all hot dog heads can go to heaven.

Categories
Cravings Culture

Apparently Deep-Dish Pizza Is Only One Of 10 Different Pizza Styles In Chicago

Just from reputation alone, I’ve always believed that New York City offered the best pizza in the United States. Biting into those phenomenal pies, I’ve often wondered if there was anywhere else in the US that could square up against those massive New York slices.

One man decided to put in the delicious work and settle the debate on which city really does offer the best pizza.

Steve Dolinsky is a 13-time James Beard Award winning TV and radio personality based in Chicago. Dolinsky hosts a segment for ABC 7 called “The Hungry Hound” where he seeks out and reviews the best restaurants in the city.

Photo: Huge Galdones

Dolinsky is also the author of the upcoming book Pizza City, U.S.A: 101 Reasons Why Chicago is America’s Greatest Pizza Town. In it, he sets out to prove that Chicago is irrefutably the best place to get pizza in the country.

During his experience, he explains that there are actually ten different types of pizzas the city is known for. Over the course of six months, Dolinsky went to 185 different pizzerias in Chicago and 56 in New York to be able to properly judge between the two cities.

He came to the conclusion that Chicago’s pizza was the superior of the two metropolises for two reasons: variety and depth.

“Not everyone likes stuffed, but some do. Not everyone likes deep, but many do. We also have tavern style and more Detroit places per capita than New York City. Quite simply, diversity wins.”

Dolinsky’s process was methodic. He wanted a baseline as to what to expect from the pizzas, so he would go in asking the style they were known for and then just order two common toppings: pepperoni and sausage.

“That was always the order when I was doing the initial assessing,” he explained. “I wanted to compare apples to apples. I didn’t think it was fair that some guy could have, even if it was a longer fermented dough, broccoli rabe and porchetta versus something that’s just pepperoni.”

In doing so, Dolinsky was able to experience the many different styles of pizza Chicago had to offer. So what else was there other than what we know as Deep Dish?

Check out the ten different styles of Chicago pizzas below.


Artisan

Photo: Huge Galdones
  • Much longer dough fermentation time, a minimum of two days.
  • A relatively more moist dough that allows for a better chew.
  • Gourmet toppings.
  • Typically everything is made in-house, which includes sauces, dough, meatballs.

Detroit

Photo: Huge Galdones
  • A pan pizza.
  • Uses brick cheese instead of mozzarella.
  • Cheese pushes to the edge of the pan and caramelizes.
  • Two racing stripes of tomato sauce only.

Tavern

Photo: Huge Galdones
  • Also known as Chicago style thin.
  • Always square cut.
  • Cheese and sauce are pushed to the edge.
  • Thin and crispy, in some cases it’s almost saltine cracker thin.

Thin

Photo: Huge Galdones
  • Wedge cut.
  • Crust is thicker than Tavern style, but not crispy.
  • Similar to New York style in terms of chewiness.
  • Not a pronounced heel (rise in the crust), an even height.

Neapolitan

Photo: Huge Galdones
  • Lots of cheese and tomato sauce.
  • Three ingredients.
  • The dough resembles leopard spotting.
  • Wood burning oven with 850-900 degrees F.

New York

Photo: Huge Galdones
  • Giant wedge.
  • Foldable with three fingers.
  • A little crispy underneath.
  • In Chicago, if you ask for sausage, it comes crumbled rather than in slices like New York.
  • There’s a lot more fennel and oregano in the sausages offered in Chicago.

Stuffed

Photo: Huge Galdones
  • Has a thin, extra top layer of dough.
  • A lake of tomato sauce on top of that.
  • Great for cheese pulls.

Deep-Dish

Photo: Huge Galdones
  • Two-inch height.
  • There’s a layer of mozzarella cheese on the bottom to protect the slice from getting soggy.
  • Chunky, strained tomatoes in the sauce.
  • Baked for 45 minutes.

Roman

Photo: Huge Galdones
  • Essentially “Pizza Tapas”.
  • Cooked in long rectangular pans.
  • Two day fermentation of the dough.
  • Baked in a special handmade oven at 580 degrees.
  • Topped with fresh, seasonal ingredients — up to 60 flavors.

Sicilian

Photo: Huge Galdones
  • Made in a shallow pan
  • Crunchy base.
  • The cheese and toppings cook for hours first before adding the sauce.
  • Served in squares.

Pizza City, U.S.A: 101 Reasons Why Chicago is America’s Greatest Pizza Town releases this upcoming September.

Categories
#foodbeast Culture Features

Sound Bites: Chef Brian Fisher

Imagine you’re in Chicago enjoying a Michelin Star-quality meal at Entente. You’ve got the perfect wine pairing to go with your visually stunning and palate pleasing dishes while the perfect soundtrack wafts from the speakers throughout the dining room, heightening the whole experience.

What’s playing to complete such a scenario? An orchestral arrangement from Bach? Perhaps the soothing sounds of Coltrane fit the scene? Nope. Try the neck-snapping stylings of ASAP Ferg’s “New Level” instead.

See at Entente, Chef Brian Fisher infuses as much energy from his playlist into the place as much as he does flavor into his impeccably seared scallops. Fisher’s love of hip hop follows him everywhere, and that includes the kitchen. This edition of Sound Bites melds the unlikely duo of fine dining and bombastic beats in a marriage that works as surprisingly well as tamarind and foie gras.

Photo: Isabelli Media Relations

It’s all about keeping the energy up, and these songs get me in the place that I like to be when I’m cooking. I don’t talk a lot. I let the music speak for me for the most part. Sometimes literally. Its more about the vibe.

I’ve had the pleasure of meeting a lot of these artists and cooking for some of them as well, so it creates a much more personal connection to these songs.

Ultimately, it comes down to keeping the energy level up, not only during the prep hours through the day, but dinner service as well, especially since the kitchen is open here, and the music is played throughout the restaurant. Granted, some of these songs are daytime only, but the artists still make it into heavy rotation in the evening playlists. Another aspect to the music here is to take people out of their comfort zone, somewhat. We could play Top 40 hits or whatever, but that doesn’t serve what we are trying to do, which in the end, is to get people to let their guard down and open up to new experiences. For the most part it works, and people kind of forget about the music, in a sense, and are immersed in not only what they’re eating but the experience that they’re sharing.

Getting hyped over some chawanmushi is an understandable moment, really. So who can blame Fisher for throwing on some Mobb Deep and feeling some type of way over being awarded a Michelin Star. It’s the perfect pairing.

Categories
Health Hit-Or-Miss News

The Meatless Impossible Burger Is Now Available In Taco Form

The plant-based Impossible Burger made huge strides in 2017, establishing itself as a legitimate beef patty substitute that wound up being served in many major restaurants such as Umami Burger and Fatburger.

Impossible Foods, the company behind the Impossible Burger, is not limiting itself to burger patties, though, as it teamed up with Tallboy Taco in Chicago for a new Impossible Taco.

If you’re not too familiar with Impossible Foods, the hype is that they created a meatless burger that actually tastes like meat. It doesn’t “almost” taste like meat, or seem “meat-ish,” it tastes like a damn burger — and even “bleeds” like one.

As mentioned, Umami Burger in California made it more accessible to the public, and in late 2017, Fatburger added the Impossible Burger to a few of its Los Angeles locations.

That real meat taste is transitioning to tacos, now, although the price tag of two for $12 is going to be a little tough to swallow.

Still, as was the case with the burger, the Impossible Taco sounds like something you should try at least once, and more importantly, it means we’re making strides in beef sustainability.

Don’t be surprised if we start seeing Impossible Beef in meatballs, nachos, rice bowls, and anything else that’s usually ground beef-based.

With plant-based progressed like this, it seems the future of food looks like it will involve a lot less cows.