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Culture Hit-Or-Miss

Blue Ramen Is The Colorful Evolution Of Your Favorite Noodles

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Photo by Rocket News

A little color in your food makes for good Instagram photos, but this might be taking things a little too far.

Kipposhi in Japan serves up a dish that loosely translates to Clear Chicken Soup Blue, and the broth comes out to a sky bluish tint, according to Rocket News 24. Shout out to that Baja Blast ramen look though.

The restaurant uses “special Chinese cooking techniques” to make the broth clear, but they gave absolutely no explanation as to how they make the broth blue.

Mahshable seemed to find the secret, however, saying that spirulina algae is what’s causing the blue tint, as is the case with the blue “Smurf Lattes” from Australia’s Matcha Mylkbar.

Apart from the blue broth, the rest of the ingredients seem to be standard, with ramen noodles, fresh greens, a soft-boiled egg, and your choice of chicken, or chashu pork.

Can’t wait until they start going around the color wheel, with red, yellow, orange, green, indigo, and violet. It’s coming. Trust.

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

What It Looks Like When You Order 100 Slices Of Pork In Your Ramen Bowl

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P.K. from RocketNews24 is our hero. The reporter decided he wanted to tackle 100 slices of chashu in a single bowl of ramen, so that’s exactly what he ordered. Chashu, a fatty pork belly that’s braised until tender and served in slices, is a common topping for ramen.

Ramen chain Ishiyaki Ramen Kazan was holding a promotion where 30 slices of chashu could be added to your ramen. Typically, a regular ramen bowl only boasts 2-3 slices. Thirty slices of pork, however, wasn’t going to cut it for P.K.

The writer asked the restaurant to add an unheard of 100 slices.

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It cost about $85, Mashable reports.

While he was only tackle about 40 slices, the reporter gets mad props for attempting such a feat. Pretty sure his body’s thanking him for calling it quits.

Photos: RocketNews24

Categories
Sweets

Cashew Chashu: the Japanese Bakery Where the Ramen Is Actually Made Out of Cake

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It’s kinda like that hyper-realistic asparagus cake we saw last year, except instead of replacing something yucky with something awesome, we’re just replacing something awesome with something even more awesome.

Behold, ladies and gents, the only possible way to improve a steaming hot bowl of miso ramen topped with succulent chashu pork and freshly chopped green onions. Which is, of course, to make it out of cake.

Designed by the Machi no Kumasan bakery in Gunma, Japan, this super-convincing ramen cake goes for about 1,000 yen or $11 USD, according to Rocket News. The “noodles” are made out of chestnut and pumpkin cream, the “broth” is Earl Grey jelly, the “chashu pork” is raspberry jelly and the “green onions” are pistachios.

Granted, the cream noodles look a bit more like udon than ramen to me, but hey it’s dinner made out of dessert. I’m sure we can let it slide.

H/T + PicThx Rocket News

Categories
Hit-Or-Miss

Here’s What A Bowl of Lego Ramen Soup Looks Like

Winter really is the most wonderful time of the year for this food blogger; not because of the parties for hosting, nor marshmallows for roasting, nor the caroling out in the snow (as if we ever get snow down in Southern California). No, winter means it’s the perfect time to enjoy a nice piping-hot bowl of soul-soothing ramen noodle soup. Of course, nobody is more aware of that fact than the nation of Japan, where the University of Tokyo has offered up this creative iteration of one of the nation’s most celebrated ramen establishments using Legos.

The display was part of the school’s 63rd Komaba Festival which hosts more than 100,000 people and is one of Tokyo’s largest festivals. The exhibition piece was inspired by Ramen Jiro, a tokyo-based ramen shop that is renown throughout the country and has even made The Guardian’s 50 Best Things to Eat in the World. The ramen shop is known for its thick and hearty pork bone, or tonkotsu broth piled high with a mountain of green onions, beansprouts, cabbage and pork belly slices, or chashu. That might explain why this particular Lego bowl looks like someone sneezed a random assortment of building blocks on top of it. Here’s a glimpse of what the real deal looks like:

via Rocketnews24/ photo courtesy of Rameniac