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Golden Road Just Released Spiked Agua Frescas To Get Summer Started

Agua frescas, common in Mexican culture and found throughout California, are an ideal drink for cooling down during the summertime months. When someone spikes the entire jug with some alcohol, it turns into a real party.

If you don’t have time to whip up an entire batch yourself, check out Golden Road’s ready-to-drink Spiked Agua Frescas. Golden Road crafts these by blending together fresh fruit and water to create a full-bodied and refreshing adult beverage.

These Spiked Agua Frescas are all sparkling alcoholic beverages and come in three flavors, Mango, Strawberry Pineapple, and Cucumber Lime, ranging from 90-110 calories. They’re great to have on hand for a quick get-together, or can be used for an epic party, which is what the Foodbeast crew did when they used the Agua Frescas for a summertime ceviche bash.

You can find the Spiked Agua Frescas at participating retailers in California. As for the ceviche, which pairs perfectly with the Agua Frescas, that recipe can be found below.

Ingredients:
2 large cucumbers
2 large tomatoes
1 cilantro
1 large white onion
1/2 serrano
20 limes
1 lemon
1 pound of ground white fish
1 pound of shrimp
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper

Instructions:
Let the fish and shrimp cook in the lime and lemon juice, dice everything and don’t forget to toss the seeds from the tomato and cucumber. TAKE OUT THE SERRANO SEEDS!! Mix everything together while adding salt and pepper all over. Keep refrigerated.

Add avocados and chips/tostadas.


Created in partnership with Golden Road

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Hit-Or-Miss News

Mom Faces Jail Time After Selling Homemade Food On Facebook

A lot of us grew up buying corn from a dude walking around with a shopping cart, tamales from a lady’s trunk at Walmart, and hot dogs from a guy with a portable grill on the sidewalk, so it’s easy to forget that you actually need permits to sell food legally.

This mom was reminded the hard way, as she was arrested for selling her homemade ceviche through a Facebook group based in Stockton, California, according to KTLA.

Mariza Ruelas said the Facebook forum was used for locals to share recipes, potluck info, and try each others’ food.

Last December, a San Joaquin undercover investigator joined the group and asked to buy some of Ruelas’s ceviche, a popular Latin American seafood dish. Next thing you know, they cracked down on the group, as 13 members picked up misdemeanors for running a food service business without a permit.

Ruelas turned down the three years of probation deal, and decided to take things to court, risking the chance of jail time.

San Joaquin County Deputy District Attorney Kelly McDaniel told KTLA, “Food prepared in a facility that does not inspect it creates a risk to the public.”

Still, Ruelas isn’t a big fan of the DA and doesn’t mind calling her out publicly over some less-than-savory reports:

It makes sense that food sold should be properly inspected, especially when selling something like seafood, but it still feels a little petty to go after this group, who probably didn’t sell their food with malicious intent.

Everyone else took the three-year probation plea deal, but Ruelas is hoping the justice system will be on her side. If not, she can face up to a year in jail.

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Features FOODBEAST Now Trending Restaurants

12 Stunning Looks At LA’s Hottest New Poke Joint, TikiFish

It’s no secret that poke’s explosion onto the Los Angeles food scene has already received its due share of attention. What with poke joints seemingly sprouting up in every corner, the trend seems to be at peak levels in the city. So to stand out amongst the multitude of restaurants certainly takes more than just a claim of the freshest fish and best toppings.

Enter TikiFish, a new poke restaurant in Palms borne out of the ambitions of two men not new to success. Ben and Bobby Hundreds, founders of The Hundreds streetwear clothing brand, set out to conquer a different playing field that now involved a culinary sense of what works. At their disposal are fresh poke, ceviche, a host of premium toppings, and a city’s sudden affinity for the trend as their base to build out this new endeavor.

With Ben and Bobby being experts on eye-catching aesthetics, the visuals of the poke bowls being moved at TikiFish along with the distinct artistic flair of the interior decor are nothing short of impressive. Yes, pictures will always paint a thousand and more words, so let’s let social media’s ever vigilant eye speak for itself on TikiFish’s reason for being one of the hottest new restaurants in Los Angeles.

Endless Summer in LA, time for #TikiFish // 📸::@the_starving_actor

A photo posted by TikiFish – Poke & Ceviche (@tikifish) on

Uni !! premium add-ons @tikifish !! 🙌 #eatdapoke #tikifish

A photo posted by Perry Cheung (@phoking_perry) on

Thanks for another fun weekend at #TikiFish :: #EatDaPoke

A photo posted by TikiFish – Poke & Ceviche (@tikifish) on

#TikiFish

A photo posted by TikiFish – Poke & Ceviche (@tikifish) on

👀🐟🐠❤️ #tikifish #losangeles #bobbyhundreds #goodfood #poke #love #ceviche

A photo posted by Erica May (@ehrka) on

accidentally discovered a charming new lunch spot with @standard_div yesterday! #eatdapoke #tikifish

A photo posted by Megan Lawler (@gegdela) on

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#foodbeast FOODBEAST Hit-Or-Miss

Here’s A Breakdown of Raw Dishes, So You Don’t Feel Like a Noob When Ordering Them

Have you ever been to a restaurant and just stared at the menu in silence wondering what on Earth the strange terms were in front of you? You’re not alone. There seems to be a fancy name for everything these days, but a category of foods where this is extremely apparent is raw fish and meat dishes. It turns out there is a marked difference between tartare, ceviche, and crudo. Who knew?

Here’s a breakdown of some raw dishes you might find, so you can navigate that menu like a pro.

Carpaccio

beef carpaccio

Traditional carpaccio is made with either fish or beef, with the most popular renditions using beef sirloin or tuna. However, this dish is increasingly being catered towards vegetarians, employing veggies like zucchini or cucumber. Carnivorous or not, the determining factor of carpaccio is definitely how thin each piece is, so when you see a raw dish with laser thin slices, you’ll know what it is.

Tartare

steak tartare

Tartare originally gained its namesake for being a dish that used tartar sauce, but after years of modifications, the standard application of this dish no longer uses the notorious sauce. You can find this dish made with fish pretty much anywhere since it’s considered “trendy,” but you should really head to your local French restaurant and get steak tartare served with rye bread because that shit is bomb. Especially because some places will add an egg yolk for that extra yolk porn.

Ceviche

peruvian ceviche

Ceviche is a Latin American-inspired dish guaranteed to be on the menu at your nearest Peruvian restaurant or place that takes great pride in their fresh fish selection. Each piece of raw fish destined for ceviche spends several hours in a nice lemon-lime, citrus juice bath. The fish is then traditionally served with sweet potato or avocado in its own delicious juices, and garnished with onion or chili peppers. The acidity gives the fish an appearance of being cooked, but citrus doesn’t get rid of bacteria so if you’re making this dish at home, be sure to use the freshest seafood possible.

Crudo

fluke crudo

Crudo is probably the simplest of all these dishes, and literally means “raw” in Italian. Basically all you need for a crudo is raw fish, olive oil, and a splash of lemon. Considering there’s only three ingredients, I kind of feel like this dish can be a hoax, since depending on the place, it can be devastatingly overpriced. However, this dish can be beautiful if the chef likes to take liberties with their plating.

Gravlax

gravlax

There are few Nordic foods that have become mainstream in Western cuisine, but gravlax is definitely one of them. Gravlax is made by taking the freshest salmon you can find (literally, the dish was created by fishermen, so you have some competition), and curing it with salt, sugar, and dill. After curing for a few days, the fish is typically served atop rye bread with some sort of sauce. Because we like to Americanize everything, gravlax is also commonly eaten with bagels as an alternative to lox.

Poke

hawaiian poke

Poke, also known as a raw fish salad, is probably one of the hottest dishes on the menu right now and we have Hawaii to thank. The dish had some pretty humble beginnings, starting out as a simple snack amongst fishermen while they were waiting for the next catch. Today, there are restaurants across the country that focus solely on poke, serving it atop sushi rice with tons of fresh veggies. The fish is typically seasoned fairly simply, with soy sauce and sesame oil as the base.

Sashimi

sashimi

Sashimi is pretty much sliced, raw fish served on a plate. You can obviously find this at a sushi establishment as an alternative to a roll, but if a restaurant is pretty stoked about a fresh catch, they’ll often let the flavors of the fish do the talking and serve it plain regardless of the cuisine. Sashimi originated in Japan, and is considered one of the highest delicacies, as only the freshest, most quality fish is used.

Nigiri

nigiri

Nigiri is essentially sashimi, but served over rice in bite-sized pieces. It’s always a mystery to us how they make those little mounds of rice so perfect, but such is the life of a good sushi chef.

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Features Recipes Tastemade/Snapchat

How Tuna Is Prepared Around The World

Seafood lies at the heart of any coastal community or island nation. Historically, cultural and geographical differences have shut sea creatures out of the cuisines of landlocked locales while inspiring creativity in others. Even before globalization and flash freezing made fish accessible, tuna had managed to work its way into diets across the globe.

tuna-prepared-water
Photo: Takashi Hososhima / Flickr

Here are a few of the easiest tuna recipes from around the world:

Poke – Hawaii

The idea of raw fish salad may sound off-putting, but in reality, Poke is a genuinely stunning salad. Originally this Hawaiian dish was made with fish scraps from raw, cubed yellowfin tuna and a plethora of condiments. In recent years, poke’s simple construction has reached a new level of sophistication.

tuna-prepared-dish-tartar
Photo: Photoskate

Ahi Shoyu Poke

  • 1 lb. fresh ahi steaks, cut into cubed, bite-size pieces
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce (shoyu)
  • 1/4 cup chopped green onions (tops included)
  • 1/4 cup chopped Maui onion (or yellow onion)
  • 2 tsp. sesame oil
  • 1 tsp. grated fresh ginger
  • 1 chili pepper, cored, seeded and diced (optional)
  • Sea salt, to taste
  • 2 tsp. toasted sesame seeds
  • 2 tsp. finely chopped toasted macadamia nuts (optional, as a substitute for inamona, which is difficult to find outside of Hawaii)

In a large bowl, combine all the ingredients, and mix lightly. Cover and refrigerate at least 2 hours before serving.

Recipe from Hawai’i Magazine

Ceviche – Peru

Are you ready for more raw tuna? Good.

Ceviche is the undisputed national dish of Peru that has inspired numerous variations throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. While the OG recipe is over 2,000 years old and doesn’t discriminate against other types of fish, tuna tends to be favored.

tuna-prepared-dish
Yummy! Photo: leyla.a

Ahi Tuna Ceviche

  • 1/2 pound Ahi tuna steak (sashimi grade if possible), diced
  • 2 Tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1/2 Tablespoon rice vinegar (I used O Yuzu rice vinegar, see Cook’s note)
  • 1/2 of a Serrano pepper, very thinly sliced
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 5 small leaves of fresh mint
  • sprinkle of black sesame seeds (optional)

In a medium bowl, mix soy sauce, toasted sesame oil, rice vinegar, Serrano pepper, lime juice, mint, and sesame seeds.

Next, add diced tuna and toss to coat. Serve immediately.

Recipe from The Enchanted Cook.

Canned Tuna – United Kingdom

Though the US consumes a significant amount of canned tuna, with only 20 percent of our population, the UK enjoys a surprisingly comparable tonnage. Brits love canned tuna more than colonialism or cricket combined. It would be remiss not to include a sandwich so integral to the British way of life.

tuna-prepared-sandwhich Wash it down with a pint. Photo: Parker-Knight

Tuna Cucumber Sandwich

  • One can of tuna fish in oil (preferably filet)
  • 3-4 tbsp of mayonnaise (or to your preference)
  • ⅛ cup diced onions OR 2 tsp of onion powder
  • ⅛ cup diced celery (optional, for peasants)
  • ¼ cup thinly sliced cucumber
  • 2 tsp butter
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • Sliced white or sourdough bread

Open the can of tuna and strain excess oil using the lid. DO NOT use a strainer unless you greatly dislike flavor.

In a medium-sized bowl, mash chunks out of tuna with a fork, but don’t go crazy because this isn’t pate.

Add mayonnaise, onions and, if you really must, celery. Mix until combined, adding salt and pepper as you see fit.

Butter both slices of bread. Trust me.

Spread tuna mixture over a slice of bread and drape with cucumber slices.

Place the other slice atop the cucumbers. If you’re an adult not going to a tea party, don’t cut the crusts off.