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Alcohol

Old Bay Beer: The Seafood Companion We Wish We Knew About Before

Photo: Flying Dog

When thinking about Old Bay, two things that quickly come to mind is some fresh seafood and a glass of ice-cold beer.

I just learned that you can now enjoy two of those elements in a single sip. Yup, turns out Old Bay Beer is a very real thing.

Old Bay partnered up with Flying Dog, Maryland’s largest brewery, to release a beer called Dead Rise five years ago. Because of its exclusivity, Flying Dog is the only brewery in existence to use Old Bay seasoning in their product. The name Dead Rise pay homage to the Chesapeake fishing boats that gather shellfish year-round.

Originally a blonde ale, the beer is now brewed as a gose boasting a lemony tartness with little bitterness and 5.7% ABV.

For those interested in checking it out, you can locate a bottle through their beer finder. Man, now I’m craving seafood.

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Alcohol Brand Hacks SPONSORED What's New

‘Jalisco Style’ Is the Beer Hack You Need to Celebrate National Tequila Day

National Tequila Day is July 24th. It’s a magical day, one that many might be afraid of partaking in. Instead of taking that shot straight, there’s a trick to get it down without the pain.

Here’s a hint: Put it in a beer.

This nifty pro tip is called “Jalisco Style,” which is quite fitting considering that tequila is named after Tequila, Jalisco, the city it originated in.

But on to the specifics. First step, grab an Estrella Jalisco, since this beer is rooted in Jalisco, Mexico.

Second, stick the rim in some Tajin. Drown it in Tajin, even.

Third, and this is the key, add a splash of tequila in your beer. Don’t look at me like that. Trust, it works.

Fourth, squeeze a lime in there. Maybe two, if you’re really feeling crazy.

That’s it!

Now there’s no excuse to not participate in a national holiday such as the one upon us.

Check out the video above to catch a visual of how this is done, and the tasty end result.

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Alcohol Technology

Miller Lite Releases First-Ever Gaming Controller Beer Can

The week of E3 never fails to be a bustling cornucopia for gaming announcements. While we’re here rewatching all the new gameplay trailers that have dropped over the weekend, it seems Miller Lite has been hard at work creating an item that encapsulates the best of both gaming and beer consumption.

Yes, we now live in a world where a fully-functioning beer can gaming controller exists.

Called the Cantroller, the device is toted as the first-ever video game controller that you can drink from. Fully-functioning, it also doubles as a 12oz can of Miller Lite. Specs on the Cantroller include Bluetooth that connects to multiple consoles and PC, haptic feedback, and a three-hour lithium-ion battery. Also, beer.

A live demonstration of the Cantroller in action will air live on Twitch on Wednesday, June 12, to coincide with the launch event. Comedian Eric Andre and Complexity gamers BananaSlamJamma and ShahZam will be present to demonstrate the intricacies of the first-of-its-kind device.

As of right now, the only way to get one is to beat Eric Andre using one of the cantrollers at the July 12 drop event by going head-to-head with Andre and winning. It will be held at 1147 S HOPE STREET LOS ANGELES, CA, between 7-11pm.

Only 200 cantrollers are currently available so the first 200 gamers who beat him can get their hands on a device.

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Alcohol Drinks Features

Blue Moon Creator Shares His Journey To Cannabis Beer And The Difficulties Behind The Brew

Photos courtesy Ceria Brewing

Late last year, Dr. Keith Villa, the founder of Blue Moon, launched his very own line of cannabis-infused beer name Ceria. Based in Colorado, the brew sold out almost immediately upon launch and has become a hot ticket purchase at local dispensaries in the state.

So what was the journey behind Ceria?

Villa, who holds a PhD in brewing from the University of Brussels in Belgium, began his career more than 30 years ago at MillerCoors. Upon his retirement, Villa and his wife immediately began their own brewery based out of Colorado.

His foray into weed beer actually began a little bit before his retirement from Blue Moon and parent company MillerCoors in 2018.

Photos courtesy Ceria Brewing

“In 2014, that’s when recreational cannabis became legal in the state of Colorado. At that time there was still a pretty large stigma around cannabis,” he recalled. “But I thought, it’s very possible to brew with cannabis because if you look at the genetics in the family tree of hops, you’ll see that cannabis is a close cousin of the hops plant.”

Ever the scientist, Villa began to test the concept afterhours.

“So I tried at home and on my own time because I never wanted to endanger the federal brewing permit of Blue Moon and Coors. So I always did it, all the cannabis experiments at home on my own time.”

That’s when the first semblance of Ceria came to existence.

“I found out quickly that, you can brew some beers with cannabis. That really got me to thinking, you know, this could be a whole new category because there are so many people who don’t drink alcohol for health reasons or religious reasons or whatever and they do want cannabis, because a lot of people believe cannabis does have healthful medicinal properties.”

Villa brought his wife onto the new venture, someone who has been working with him from the very start during all of his home tastings and tests.

“She lived with me in Belgium where I was getting my PhD. She’s one of the few people I know and trust that actually has lived in Belgium and can truly judge Belgian Beers and European-style beers.”

Photos courtesy Ceria Brewing

The two put their heads together and discovered that this could be an entirely new frontier that’s been untapped.

“We started figuring out right away that this could be a whole new category for beer. And so yeah, when we retired, we started Ceria Brewing Company and figured out right away that the best path forward was to focus on great tasting, non-alcoholic beers, craft beers that have the effects of cannabis and not the effects of alcohol. It was really hard creating a great tasting non-alcoholic beer. “

Villa didn’t seem like a man who would shy away from the challenge, however.

“Luckily with all my years of brewing experience as a brewmaster, I was able to create a series of non-alcoholic beers that taste really good. The next step is adding the cannabis in. So we have the effects of cannabis inside of a great smelling and great tasting craft beer.”

Photos courtesy Ceria Brewing

Working with cannabis and alcohol is an extremely tricky task. Dr. Villa explained that there were some major legal hurdles they had to overcome before launching their new product.

“Cannabis is federally illegal,” Villa states. “Though it is legal in the state of Colorado. So the first hurdle was alcohol, because the federal government, they strictly forbid anybody to put something that’s federally illegal into an alcoholic beverage. So you cannot add cannabis to it.”

“The Colorado Division of Revenue, through a subdivision called the Marijuana Enforcement Division (MED), is the agency who controls and regulates the cannabis industry,” Villa explains.

Essentially, you can’t add cannabis to an alcoholic product and you can’t add alcohol to a cannabis product in the state of Colorado.

“So it was real clear right away that we could not have an alcoholic product with cannabis,” he said. “That’s what necessitated me to create a great tasting non-alcoholic beer. So that was definitely the first hurdle.”

Once Villa nailed the taste he wanted for a non-alcoholic beer, he set his sights on a different obstacle.

“After that, the biggest hurdle was getting people to taste our product because so many have read about cannabis or heard about it. And so many are just afraid of getting stoned. Well, our product is always going to be a lower dose so that people can trust it and not get stoned. They can get a mild buzz off, but they won’t get stoned.”

Photos courtesy Ceria Brewing

Finally, Dr. Villa explains the rich history behind his company’s name.

“Ceria is actually from the Roman goddess of fertility and agriculture. She’s in history, she is the goddess of agriculture, meeting hops and cannabis. Her name is Ceres. That’s where we get the names, cereal — like breakfast cereal. That’s where we get the name of Ceria.”

Boasting a medium-bodied taste and some notes of citrus and a smooth malty finish, Ceria can be purchased at select dispensaries throughout the state of Colorado. Villa shares in parting that Ceria plans on expanding to other states in the upcoming months as well as the development of new flavors.

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Alcohol Drinks

Blue Moon’s Founder Created A New Cannabis-Infused Beer And It Sold Out Quickly

Photo courtesy of Ceria

Keith Villa is probably best known for his contribution to the field of alcohol with his creation of Blue Moon. The brewmaster and founder was part of MillerCoors for approximately 32 years until his retirement early last year.

Now, in a time where cannabis-boasting beverages are becoming more and more prominent, Villa has launched a new brew that’s infused with pot: Grainwave Belgian-Style White Ale.

A medium-bodied Belgian-Style White Ale, Ceria is brewed with coriander and blood orange peels. As a spin on Belgian Ale, the beer is de-alcoholized and microdosed with 5mg of THC.

Villa’s new brewing company, Ceria Brewing Co., launched Grainwave last December in local dispensaries around the Colorado area and the initial batch sold out in about four hours.

While non-alcoholic, the brew is said to capture the flavors of a classic Belgian ale while providing the calming effects of cannabis.

Currently those looking to try Grainwave can find them in select dispensary locations in Denver, CO. For now, at least, it will remain a Colorado exclusive.

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Alcohol Beer Culture Drinks Opinion

Should Alcoholic Beverages Be Required To List Their Ingredients?

The light beer wars have officially escalated to new heights. After Bud Light’s round of Super Bowl commercials trashing Miller Lite and Coors Light for their usage of corn syrup, MillerCoors has struck back with a lawsuit accusing their rivals of false advertising and trademark dilution. They claim that corn syrup is no longer present in their beers after the fermentation progress, and wanted Bud Light’s campaigns to cease.

In theory, both sides are right. Corn syrup can be used as a sugar source for beer fermenting, and MillerCoors has said that they use it as such. However, by the time the beer is ready for tapping, all of that has been converted into alcohol, just like the rice that Bud Light uses for their brew.

The bigger question that this debate brings up, though, is one of transparency in the alcohol industry. Bud Light got this topic buzzing with their campaigns, which, on top of the corn syrup, added an ingredient label to their boxes to “show transparency.” Since it’s not currently required for alcohol brands to display their ingredients, this was groundbreaking for the industry.

As the conflict surrounding these light beers rages on, though, one has to wonder: should alcoholic beverages be required to list their ingredients?

For those wondering why ingredients don’t have to be labeled, it’s a matter of regulation and jurisdiction. While the FDA requires all food products in their space to list all of the ingredients, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, or TTB, does not. In the case of malted beverages, the only ingredients that have to be declared are saccharin and aspartame (two artificial sweeteners), sulfites (a potential allergen), and FD&C Yellow No. 5 (a food dye.)

All other components of beers, including the sugar source, any potential flavorings or colorings, and clarifying agents, don’t have to be declared. From a food science perspective, these could technically be classified as “processing aids” since the final product would just be flavors from hops, alcohol, water, and any colors that resulted from the brewing or fermenting process. Still, it is important to know what was used to brew a beer, especially a light beer. Since these tend to use rice or corn instead of barley as a fermenting source, consumers should be able to know which brands use what.

For vegans, transparency is also a concern because of something called isinglass. This beer clarifying agent is derived from fish bladders and is used to filter the beer of any leftover suspended yeast. Some specific brands note that they don’t use isinglass, leading to a category of “vegan-friendly” brews.

In a way, Bud Light is opening the public’s eyes to these issues with their campaign, but they are also playing on fear-mongering stigma because of the negative image corn syrup has in the eyes of the general public. Nonetheless, the conversation they are bringing up about ingredients in beer is one that should be taken more seriously.

The Foodbeast audience definitely agrees with that sentiment, too. A current poll up on our Twitter account is showing that 90 percent of participants feel that alcohol should list their ingredients.

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Alcohol Beer Recipes

8 Recipes That Get Creative When Cooking With Beer

Photo: So Delicious

Are you interested in cooking with beer more? Well, you have so many options on what to do! Beer is actually a flavorful and versatile ingredient in any kitchen. Here are some great beer recipes to get you started! 

Cooking with alcohol is always a very flavorful idea for anyone to try. And cooking with beer is one of the more interesting options when it comes to flavor and versatility. That’s why we’ve grouped these beer recipes and made a list (that we have, indeed, checked twice) for your pure enjoyment!

8 beer recipes to try at home

1. Cheddar and beer soup

This Cheddar and beer soup really is for the brave! That is because it is like nothing you’ve ever tried before. It’s strong and interesting flavors come from using Cheddar, bechamel sauce, beer, garlic, and smoked paprika. Not the most usual ingredients for soup, but these ones here are definitely worth a try.

2. Beer shrimp skillet

Pan-cooking shrimp is a simple 15-minute job and you get a juicy and nutritious appetizer. The beer-flavored sauce is the true game-changer in our case. Spike it with ginger and chili and give it a hint of sweet. Use cornstarch instead of flour to get a thicker sauce and don’t forget to use your favorite beer.

3. Carbonade flamande

It’s cold. A filling stew, extra-meaty with beef and bacon, is all you need. Toss some flour into the pan for a thicker sauce and flavor it with beer. Any kind of beer that is, which will influence the overall taste to your liking. Plenty other flavors and tastes are competing in this stew, just so you can pass the winter easier.

4. Beer and spinach mac and cheese

What can you bring new to a classic American dish? Add some bear to it! If you’re not sure about this combo, trust us when we say it’s totally worth it. You can also add some spinach and lots of different types of cheese. We recommend mozzarella, parmesan, and Cheddar.

5. Beer-battered trout

Here is your necessary protein intake for today, in the form of battered trout. Drop some beer into the batter just to get cheekier, coat the fish with it, and fry. Serve the wonderful result with salad mix, a dip, and lime wedges.

6. Lamb ribs with soy sauce and beer

These lamb ribs are meaty, succulent, and dripping with flavor. And they’re also not that hard to make. Marinate the ribs in a thyme, brown sugar, soy sauce, garlic, lime, and beer mixture. Then cook them in some vegetable oil. Serve with a bunch of nutritious leafy greens and a spicy dip!

7. Beer-braised pork roll

Roasting pork meat in dark beer makes it incredibly flavorful! The meat gets a crunchy caramel-like brown crust on the outside and a juicy and consistency on the inside. But the beauty of this pork roll lays in its stuffing – black olives and fresh herbs, like rosemary and oregano, enhance the meat with incredible flavors.

8. Dark beer roasted chicken legs

These dark beer roasted chicken legs really were the talk of the day on last night’s gathering. But what made them so good? We bet it would be the following 2 things. They were cooked in rich dark beer, which made them deliciously tender, and they were coated with lots of flavorful spices which made them finger-licking good!

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Article by Ruxandra Grecu from So Delicious. View the original article here.

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Alcohol Beer Drinks Health

How Many Calories Are Actually Inside The Alcohol You’re Drinking

Photo: So Delicious

People tend to count calories when it comes to food, but not many are very familiar with alcohol calories. How many are there in your favorite drinks?

When you go to the supermarket, all of the foods you pick up have their calories written on their sleeve. Or more precisely, their labels. But brewers, distillers, and winemakers are under no obligation to do that. According to Vox, the drink-related industries have been lobbying for years to keep it that way. Researchers in the BMJ called for mandatory nutrition labels, saying that alcoholic drinks contribute to obesity.

Some of the biggest brewers in America, like Anheuser-Busch, MillerCoors, Heineken USA, Constellation Brands Beer Division, North American Breweries, and Craft Brew Alliance, promised to begin publishing nutrition information on labels by next year. But that’s just beer and just the calories in beer. Wines, spirits, and mixed drinks will still be unknowns. Especially since a lot of them contain a lot of added sugars, flavors, and preservatives.

Lindsay Moyer, senior nutritionist at the Center for Science in Public Interest (CSPI) has started to track calories in popular alcoholic drinks. Her findings were published in CSPI’s Nutrition Action website.

Check the list out, to know what you’re dealing with when drinking and even cooking with alcohol if you’re into counting calories.

Alcohol calories: how does beer fit in? 

“The calories in alcohol are a concern because people may forget about them,” said Moyer for Vox. “We’re used to seeing calories on nutrition facts labels for almost any food package, but when you pick up an alcoholic drink, that information just isn’t there.”

Most 12-ounce cans of light beer have about 100 calories. Others, which are just fairly light, have about 150 calories. A lot of Belgian brews, IPAs, and stouts get to huge calorie levels, 200 to 300.

Alcohol Calories: Do You Know How Many You’re Drinking?
Beer varies when it comes to calories. The more alcohol it contains, the more calories it has as well.

Mixed drinks are loaded with sugar

A lot of the mixed drinks are full of sugar because of the juice, tonic water, or mixer and they’re often sweetened with high-fructose-corn-syrup. Some of them reach 350 calories, while others can take you up to 700 if you can believe that. Unfortunately, we can.

Not to mention that the energy they give you is not as filling as solid foods, so you will still want to eat a lot after having one of these drinks.

Wines have more calories than beer

According to CSPI data, most 6-ounce glasses of red or white wine have about 150 calories. Even though red wine is said to be incredibly healthy for you, that’s still a lot. And most of us have multiple glasses for dinner or when we go out. But this is your average glass of wine. There are sweeter varieties that are on trend right now, like Moscato.

How do you know to not up your calorie intake too much? There is a clue when it comes to alcohol content. The larger the percentage of alcohol, the bigger the number of calories in the drink you’re thinking of having. And the sweeter the drink, the more calories as well. Like for anything, the idea here is to drink in moderation, if you’re concerned about your calorie intake.

Related Links:


Article by Ruxandra Grecu from So Delicious. View the original article here.