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#foodbeast FOODBEAST Going In Restaurants Video

Every Dish You HAVE To Try At 15-Year-Old Actor Hudson Yang’s Restaurant

Actor Hudson Yang, who portrays a younger version of chef Eddie Huang in the ABC hit series, Fresh Off The Boat, is just 15-years-old. However, he’s already getting his feet wet in the restaurant business, much like the culinary icon he portrays.

Yang is an investor in Không Tên, a restaurant in Los Angeles, California that serves New American food through a Vietnamese lens. That means you’ll find dishes like eggs Benedict, charcuterie, and other nationwide favorites, all with a Vietnamese spin on it. Yang sees it as a start on his own pathway to potentially becoming a chef, a dream inspired by his grandmother and her cooking.

On a recent episode of Foodbeast’s show Going In, hosts Elie Ayrouth and Marc Kharrat joined Yang and his father, Jeff, to sample the entire menu at Không Tên. With executive chef Kim Vu’s menu ranging from crab fried rice to a unique take on fried chicken & waffles, there was plenty to choose from in terms of standout dishes. These are the ones, though, that the whole squad kept going back for.

K10 Chicken & Waffles

Chef Vu’s take on chicken & waffles spins the concept totally on its head. The fried chicken breast is coated in a Saigon cinnamon breading and served with plum sugar syrup and Fresno chili hot sauce as a blend of sweet and spicy condiments. As for the waffle, it’s a Vietnamese-style sweet potato spider waffle, which looks more like a bed of deep-fried noodles but still provides that sweetness you’re looking for in the beloved brunch combo.

House Made Vietnamese Charcuterie

Charcuterie is more in the realm of Europe, but as it grows universal appeal in the United States, you’ll find more creative versions of it like this one. Chef Vu’s platter includes chicken pate, Vietnamese mortadella, pork head cheese, and grilled skewers of pork — all made in house.

Crispy Whole Fish

 

 

If you’re looking for a massive plate for the entire table to share, the crispy whole fish is the way to go. With house sauce, lettuce cups, a giant rice cracker, and plenty of fresh herbs to go with it, there’s a variety of creative ways to enjoy this meal as well.

Hudson Yang has definitely picked an innovative first restaurant to invest in, and it’ll be interesting to see how his work here influences the food he may eventually cook at a restaurant where he’s the chef, as he has aspirations to eventually become one.

To get the lowdown on what Yang and the Foodbeast squad thought of every single Không Tên dish, peep the full episode of Going In in the video at the top of this article.

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#foodbeast

Mexican Chorizo and Garlic Shrimp Burger

chorizo-burger091

Recipe: Lady and Pups

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Humor

This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things: Man Steals 75 Chopsticks, Hides Them in His Pants

chopsticks

A Madison man, accused of trespassing in the Hong Kong Café, was found in a nearby McDonald’s last week with 75 chopsticks shoved down his pants after being searched by police.

The 60-year-old Michael Arms was allegedly trespassing in the Hong Kong Café, but by the time the police arrived, he had left, along with 75 chopsticks.  The police found him across the street at a McDonald’s. Although the owner had originally called the police because of trespassing, he was surprised to find out that the real crime was theft.

“The owner said the suspect was asked numerous times to leave since he was just hanging out and not dining,” said police spokesman Joel DeSpain. “He eventually sat down on the dining room floor in the middle of the restaurant, asking ‘Why are you hating on me?'”

“Why are you hating on me?” A great question posted by the alleged, to which I have a few questions of my own: Why steal 75 chopsticks? Don’t you need 76? What good does one chopstick do without its mate? I guess you could poke food. And since he was found in a McDonald’s, eating fries with a single chopstick can’t be that difficult. It’s at least easier than eating rice with only one chopstick, no matter how sticky the rice. And, a Big Mac eaten with a single chopstick immediately classes up the meal. It becomes Asian-American fusion, or a Big Mac hors d’oeuvre.

In the end, can we really fault a man for wanting upward food mobility? Yes, because this is why we can’t have nice things.

H/T LaCrosseTribune

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Restaurants

This is What Clam Chowder Udon Looks Like

Earlier this week I had a chance to fly out to Cleveland, Ohio for Certified Angus Beef’s 2012 Culinary Ideation and Trends Session. The post for all that is coming soon, but while I was there, I also caught wind of at least one food item I never thought I would hear about, ever.

I im’ed my editor immediately:

“Clam. Chowder. Udon.”

This explosion of East meets . . . further . . . East comes from Cleveland-based restaurant Noodlecat, which opened in August 2011. Branded as a “slurpalicious Japanese-American mash-up from Chef Jonathon Sawyer,” much of Noodlecat’s menu looks like what happens when a college student decides to go to culinary school and comes back to make the exact same foods he made before, only a million times better.

To be honest, the whole menu is jaw-dropping, so expect this to turn into a continuing series of posts, but to kick us off, the Clam Chowder Udon pictured above is a fusion-inspired soup made with udon noodles, potatoes, onions, celery and bacon, in a creamy clam and bonito broth.

Truth be told, the official menu actually says the bacon is “optional,” but if you’re a regular Foodbeast reader, you should know by now that bacon is never optional. And if you’re a regular Foodbeast reader from Ohio, neither is paying Noodlecat a visit. Like, right now.

[Photo via Noodlecat]