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These Mortal Kombat Beers Are 100 Times Better Than The Movies

Most people my age (28) have pretty fond memories of playing Mortal Kombat as a child. Hell, I even used to love the old movies too, until I watched them as an adult and wanted to vomit into my own eyes thanks to horrendous acting and shit-for-poop graphics.

Sound Brewery in Poulsbo, Washington, has come out with three beers honoring arguably the three most popular characters from Mortal Kombat: Sub-Zero, Scorpion and Raiden. Each beer is a specific flavor, adorned with the character’s signature look on the label.

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The Sub-Zero is an Imperial IPA, the Raiden is an Imperial Saison a.k.a. a Belgian-style, and the Scorpion is an Imperial Stout with hints of vanilla bean and chile flavors. In regards to the style and character pairings, it’s safe to say that each beer represents the essence of these characters pretty well. On top of that, each beer has an ABV of 8-8.5%. Drinking too many of these will surely lead to a…fatality…

Sorry, had to.

 

 

Photo Credit: Geek

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Hit-Or-Miss Products

Not Your Father’s Root Beer Adds A Much Stronger Drink To The Family

image001Beer isn’t for everyone. In fact, you might be surprised at how many people there are out there that flat out don’t like the taste, despite its crisp drinkability and very wide variety of refreshing flavors.

image002Damn, now I need a beer.

One company noticed a trend of regular drinks becoming “hard”, such as Mike’s Hard Lemonade and Redd’s Apple Cider. Small Town Brewery in Wauconda, Illinois, decided to throw their brewing hat into the ring when they made Not Your Father’s Root Beer, a delicious root beer-flavored alternative to the average can of beer.

After Small Town’s success with Not Your Father’s Root Beer and Not Your Father’s Ginger Ale, the brewery decided to bottle and manufacture their stronger version of the drink. While the mass produced version clocks in at 5.9% ABV (alcohol by volume), the brewery will begin mass producing their stronger variety, a version of NYFRB with a 10.7% ABV, nearly twice the amount in a regular NYFRB.

The initial success of NYFRB led to the stronger version being created, however it’s only available around the brewery, usually in cities and districts within an hour or so of the Chicago area. In order to keep the heavy beer hitters interested, Small Town will be selling the 10.7% ABV version in 22 oz. cans or “bombers”, at $7.99 a piece.

 

 

via Small Town Brewery

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Hit-Or-Miss

Why We Call It Alcoholic ‘Proof’ (Or How British Sailors Used to Be Freaking Pyros)

proof

Picture a creaking ship. Disgruntled sailors. Cheating merchants. Toss in a bit of gunpowder and boredom and you have yourself the beginnings of our modern-day alcohol “proof” system. It turns out those seemingly arbitrary numbers printed on liquor bottles that require you to do MATH to figure out alcohol content actually have a semi-reasonable explanation. That is, in order to protect themselves against watered-down booze, sailors in the British navy used to mix their rum with gunpowder, taking note that only alcohol that hadn’t been diluted would actually ignite when lit. The flame, therefore, was considered “proof” the rum was actually worth anything – and proof these were probably not the people you wanted running your ship.

According to The Customs and Excise Act of 1952, spirits that were of “proof strength” needed to weigh exactly 12/13ths the volume of distilled water equal to the volume of the spirit at 51°F, or in layman’s terms, at least 57.1% ABV. Rum with this percentage of alcohol was considered to have “100 degrees proof,” while 100% ABV was 175° proof and 50% ABV was 87.5° proof. This system remained the technical standard in the UK until January 1980.

Of course, these are the same folks who spread their bass-ackwards English measuring system across the globe, only to abandon it to us stubborn Americans in favor of units that are much more precise. Not to mention that today’s proof conversion is a lot simpler than the old 7/4 ratio. Still, if you’re not itching to grab some gunpowder and set that sickly sweet Malibu on fire right now (for SCIENCE!), we aren’t doing our jobs right.

H/T Mental Floss, DCS, Wikipedia