Categories
Cravings Video

Lobster and Pastrami Highlight The Delicious Khachapuri Toppings At This LA Pop-Up

For those not familiar with the deliciousness of a khachapuri, let me break down the juicy deets for you: picture bread shaped similarly to a boat, then filled with cheese, butter, and egg. With all that then mixed in the carby vessel, one can picture the tasty affair that follows as you rip off a piece said bread, dip it into the holy trinity mixture mentioned, and fish out a bite that is nothing short of mesmerizing.

Over at Tony Khachapuri, a pop-up within Oui Bakery in Los Angeles, California, Chef Armen Piskoulian has decided to up the ante some by offering khachapuri that incorporates decadent toppings like lobster and pastrami.

Khachapuri leveling up with some plump lobster or savory pastrami is but a dream come true for all that love an added boost of flavor to the cheesy and buttery situation. Check out the video above for an in-depth look at some of the wonderful styles of khachapuri Tony Khachapuri is serving up.

Categories
Alcohol Brand Restaurants Video

3 Sakes To Give Your Oysters An Umami Flavor Boost

When thinking of what drinks to pair with seafood, like oysters, sake is something you should keep at the top of your mind. The natural umami present within sake and oysters don’t just pair with each other: they mesh and enhance each other, meaning you get more umami from the two combined than either individually.

This is because sake and seafood contain different types of umami compounds. Umami compounds are substances found naturally in food that trigger tastebuds to register the savory taste umami has in our brains. Sake has a compound called glutamic acid, while oysters contain another called inosinic acid. When combined, they are shown to have a synergistic effect that enhances umami.

A recent joint study between JFOODO and Japanese company AISSY looked at these pairings by quantifying umami as an “umami score” across multiple types of beverages. White wine is a typical beverage to pair with seafood, but based on these umami scores, sake results in a larger increase in umami. According to a press release, when paired with raw oysters, white wine only increased the umami score by 0.13 points, while pairing the oysters with sake increased the umami score by 0.41 points. This signifies a larger enhancement of umami in our mouths when we drink sake with seafood over white wine.

Foodbeast and food Instagrammer @ashyi recently got to experience this new type of pairing style firsthand. She met up with sake sommelier Bryan West at Shuck Oyster Bar in Costa Mesa, California to try some different sakes meant to pair perfectly with oysters.

The three sakes West recommended are as follows:

Born:Gold Junmai Daiginjo, Katoukichibee Shouten

This gold tinted sake is cold-aged for about a year, lending to some light and sweet undertones that cut through the briny, salty flavors oysters contain while still packing a savory punch. 

Suigei Junmai Ginjo Koiku No. 54, Suigei Brewing

Suigei Brewing’s Koiku No. 54 is made with Gin-no Yume rice, which is locally produced in the same region the brewery is located in. It’s a semi-dry, light sake with citrusy notes, yet still retains a strong umami flavor that pairs with and enhances an oyster’s taste.

Mutsu Hassen ISARIBI Special Junmai, Hachinohe Shuzo

“Isaribi” is the name given to a fire meant to lure fish at night. It’s a fitting name for this rich, dry sake, which was crafted to pair well with all types of seafood, including oysters.

Each of the above sakes has unique flavor profiles and qualities, but all contain that glutamic acid that provides the umami synergy with oysters. Together, that creates a mouthwatering flavor combo that you can’t get with just either alone.

A unique yet optimal way to combine the two umami sensations is through something called a “sake drop,” where some of the sake paired with a meal is spooned on top of the oyster. It’s then all eaten at once to enjoy the enhanced umami synergy.

You can try doing a sake drop at Shuck Oyster Bar, who is serving a special oyster dish alongside the Isaribi sake as part of the Unlock Your Palate campaign by JFOODO. It will be served alongside Oysters on the half shell topped with caviar, micro greens, yuzu spritz, and a dash of Fresno chili sauce. This pairing will be available at Shuck starting December 1st, and may end when the stock of sake runs out. Otherwise, it will run through the entire month.

To learn more about the sakes and how they go with oysters, check out the full video at the top of this story. You can also learn more about the pairing, and other restaurants featuring it, through JFOODO’s website, or by following the hashtags #UnlockYourPalate and #SeafoodAndSake.

Created in partnership with JFOODO

Categories
Adventures Art Restaurants Video

Harlem’s ‘The Edge’ Combines British And Jamaican Dishes With Renaissance Legacy

In Harlem, New York, the building located at 580 St. Nicholas Avenue carries a unique piece of Harlem Renaissance history. Librarian Regina Anderson Andrews, a resident there, would host rooftop and apartment gatherings where literary juggernauts like Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and W.E.B. DuBois would show up to and recite their works.

While the Harlem Renaissance has come and gone, the building has still remained a gathering place, thanks to The Edge, a restaurant located on the bottom floor that pays respect to that legacy.

Owned by sisters Juliet and Justine Masters, you can find homages to the legends that roamed the building throughout the restaurant, including a regal portrait of Langston Hughes and a collection of books folks can read while sipping on coffee and enjoying their meals.

The food here, by the way, is a unique story of its own, calling to the childhoods of the two owners. Justine and Juliet are Harlem locals, but have parents from Jamaica and Britain, and grew up eating dishes from both countries.

That has led to some creative and inspirational dishes on their menu, including a luxuriously creamy Jerk Chicken Alfredo, and coconut-crusted fish used for the British staple fish and chips. Ackee and saltfish, a national dish of Jamaica, even has a home here in tasty taco form. One also shouldn’t leave without a glass of homemade sorrel, which Juliet and Justine’s father makes on a regular basis.

With such a unique building history and innovative and tantalizing dishes, The Edge is a restaurant chock full of stories that has made it locals’ favorite.

To learn more about The Edge, check out the full video at the top of this story. The restaurant is currently offering outdoor dining, takeout, and delivery, as well as some limited indoor service.

Categories
Restaurants Video

Bang Bang Noodles: LA’s Hottest Street Food Show

Photo: Constantine Spyrou // Foodbeast

Venture out to The York in Highland Park, Los Angeles, and you’ll find more than just your typical pub grub and drinks to enjoy outdoors. Within the bar’s walls resides Bang Bang Noodles, a street food sensation that’s slinging a variety of noodles akin to what you might find on the streets of Xi’an in China.

The owner, Robert Lee, has a lot of Michelin starred-kitchen cred, but left the fine dining scene to set up his noodle stand in Los Angeles. Growing up eating street food classics, he wanted to build something “for my own, that I could relate to, that others could relate to as well,” as he told Foodbeast.

View this post on Instagram

Special thanks to @reachhard_ & @constantine_spy from @foodbeast for coming thru and showing so much love and support before our break. We did Sellout this week but we will have a new Schedule Out Next Wednesday! Thanks for all the Love & Support! Stay Safe & Eat Safe! . . . . . . . . #凉皮#handpullednoodles #tinglysoup #biangbiangnoodles #biangbiangmian #foodpornstreet #noodledough #bangbangnoodlesla1 #bangbangnoodlesla #tinglycuminlambnoodle #tinglycuminlamb #streetfoodla #shaanxistreetfood #bangbangnoodles #losangelesfood #handpullednoodle #handpullednoodles #biangbiangmien #陕西八大怪 #biángbiángmiàn #油潑扯麵 #bangbangnoodlesla1 #highlandpark #nela #uhygurcuisine #delicious #instafood #foodstagram #noodlelift #noodlelifting

A post shared by BANG BANG Noodles (@bangbangnoodlesla1) on

For Lee, that has been bowls of his noodles, which he stretches, slaps, and pulls to order. They’re cooked in boiling water and served with a spicy, tingly sauce (there’s also a soup option) as well as a bunch of toppings. Lee includes a variety of options, including lamb and shiitake mushrooms as a nod to the Uighur culture in China’s Shaanxi region, the inspiration for his own noodles. Pork, beef, and seitan round out the proteins on the menu.

Lee also includes a Xi’an tomato sauce variety that gets plated with bok choy. The tang of it elevates the noodles to a unexpected yet mouthwatering flavor experience.

View this post on Instagram

Lets start this week off with a Bang Bang! New BBN Schedule is hot off the press! NEW CALL IN HOURS 6pm-10pm Wed&Thur! Call once or twice to ensure your number gets thru but please do not flood the phone lines with repeated calls we will line up all missed calls and return them ASAP. It may take an hour or two to return calls by it please be patient with us due to our high volume of orders. Thanks for all your love and support. Stay Safe Eat Safe! Thanks again for all the love! Let’s keep Banging! . . . . . . . #凉皮#handpullednoodles #tinglysoup #biangbiangnoodles #biangbiangmian #foodpornstreet #noodledough #bangbangnoodlesla1 #bangbangnoodlesla #tinglycuminlambnoodle #tinglycuminlamb #streetfoodla #shaanxistreetfood #bangbangnoodles #losangelesfood #handpullednoodle #handpullednoodles #biangbiangmien #陕西八大怪 #biángbiángmiàn #油潑扯麵 #bangbangnoodlesla1 #highlandpark #nela #uhygurcuisine #delicious #instafood #foodstagram #noodlelift #noodlelifting

A post shared by BANG BANG Noodles (@bangbangnoodlesla1) on

To learn more about Lee’s story and Bang Bang Noodles, check out the above Foodbeast “News Bites” video.

Photo: Constantine Spyrou // Foodbeast

Bang Bang Noodles is currently open and taking reservations for orders inside of the York.

Categories
Brand Recipes Video

This Tuna Hash California Burrito Is an Ode to a San Diego Favorite

As far as quintessential Californian menu items go, few items have a claim as strong as the eponymous California burrito.

When visiting Southern California for the first time, it’s a requirement, not an option, to try a California burrito. Crispy fries, tender meat, with a gooey mix of cheese, salsa, sour cream, and guacamole, all wrapped in a massive flour tortilla— where could that even start to go wrong?

When a friend of mine, who is a recently minted Californian by way of Chicago, heard about the dish he was (almost) as excited as he was the first time he drove down a street lined by the state’s iconic palm trees. It’s that big of a deal.

The penultimate midnight meal, it’s a regional mishmash that could’ve only come to existence in San Diego, a city that lies only miles north of the Mexico-US border. For our newest recipe in collaboration with Bumble Bee® Seafoods, we looked to the city known for its roadside drive-thru’s that pump out tacos and burritos around the clock.

Meet the California Tuna Hash Burrito. Read on to see how to make this.

Before you get going, warm up some frozen crinkle cut French fries in your preferred fashion. Personally, I’d go with the oven, or an air fryer if that’s among the options.

The actual cooking element of this recipe only requires a couple ingredients: one 2.5 oz pouch of Bumble Bee® Jalapeño Seasoned Tuna, a small bell pepper, a small yellow onion, a ¼ cup Salsa Ranchera (which should be available canned at any local Hispanic grocery store), and 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil.

Throw a pan on medium-high heat, then add the vegetable oil, and dice the veggies. Once the pan is properly warmed up (a well-known test to check for this: sprinkle some water over it, if that sizzles then it’s ready), toss in the veggies. Sweat those down until they’re nicely browned, which should take around ten minutes. Add the tuna and salsa ranchero, and let that go for a couple minutes, which should reduce the salsa a bit. After that, it’s assemblage time.

Lay a tortilla flat on your counter, and place around four ounces of fries on it. Drizzle a ¼ cup each of: sour cream, guacamole, and salsa fresca. Top this ¾ – 1 cup of tuna hash, and a generous handful of grated shredded cheese.

Then, just fold in the sides and roll up the burrito.

Boom. We’re done here. All that’s left to do is to dive into the masterpiece that is the California burrito– and maybe make another one.

Categories
#foodbeast Cravings Culture FOODBEAST Restaurants Video

The LA Spot Where You Can Grill Your Own Filipino Street Food Favorites

There’s something to be said when you catch a vibe from cooking your own food in a setting that’s normally not in your own kitchen. You can find that simple pleasure when barbecuing, campfire cooking, and even sitting down to a Korean bbq meal. But a spot in Los Angeles’ Historic Filipinotown called Dollar Hits is adding its name to that list, by channeling the energy of Filipino street food and letting diners cook it themselves on grills out doors.

Step inside and you’re greeted with a wide array of Filipino street food options. Imagine heaping stacks of meat skewers ranging from traditional pork and chicken barbecue, to other favorites like fish balls, pork and chicken intestines (isaw), chicken feet (adidas), chicken head (helmet), pig ears (walkman), chicken hearts, quail egg (kwek kwek), and more.

After picking your lot to grill, simply step outside to three outdoor grills and cook your choices to taste. As far as dining experiences go in LA, Dollar Hits is quite memorable as there’s not many like it in the city.

With outdoor dining being the norm these days, Dollar Hits should serve as a great choice to add to one’s list of spots to safely eat out at, all while catching the whole Filipino street food vibe that many have yet to experience.

Categories
Food Policy Opinion Video

NYU’s Quarantine Meal Debacle Is A Wake-Up Call For Colleges Everywhere

As students have been returning to college to start the new school year, some have had to quarantine to prevent the spread of COVID-19. At New York University, students that quarantined in the dorms got meals, but their quality was so poor that videos of them went viral all over TikTok.

@benbenfuntime

I can’t make this up ##nyu ##vegan ##quarantine ##fyp

♬ Kouen – Lo-Fi Beats

For the first few days, the NYU quarantine meals program was a mess. Vegans and vegetarians received animal and dairy products, some students had missing meals, others didn’t get them delivered until late in the day… it was chaotic, to say the least.

@cheezitbabey

we literally had to drink our own pee last night ##NYU ##nyumeal ##nyutok ##quarantine ##college ##helpus ##fyp ##survivaltok

♬ original sound – cheezitbabey

After making it onto the news for their low-quality meals, NYU apologized, and pledged to do better. For the most part, they’ve lived up to that, as they’ve added more employees to help prepare and send out meals, and even sent out cases of water and snack boxes to help students get adequate nutrition.

@rico_da_fool

Chicken caesar salad but the chicken caesar salad is silent😌😌😌##nyutiktok ##nyu ##fyp ##expensive ##flex

♬ original sound – drydoodooflakes

It didn’t resolve all of the issues, however, so NYU eventually gave students $30 of delivery credit per day as a way to get dinner for the remainder of the quarantine period. They continued to serve breakfast and lunch throughout that time frame.

Considering that NYU students pay over $38,000 per semester for tuition, housing, and other expenses, the quality of the meals they were getting is shocking. It’s also bringing the value of expensive college fees into question, especially during a pandemic.

If expensive schools are serving low-quality meals, limited access to amenities paid for through tuition costs, and transitioning to online learning, then what are students really paying for? A place to stay to take online classes?

The cost of an online course is about $1,200-$1,300, and monthly, one would spent about $350 in food and $1,000 in rent per person in a 2-bedroom apartment. This means that one could go take 4 online classes at home, in a semester-long timeline, and pay under $10,000 to do so.

It’s understandable that the pandemic has changed how everything operates, including college. Given how much money students are paying schools, however, NYU should serve as a case study of what not to do to ensure student nutrition during a pandemic.

To learn more about the full debacle, check out the entire Foodbeast video on the NYU quarantine meals at the top of this story.

Categories
Fast Food Video

KFC’s Mac And Cheese Can Be Ordered By The Bucket, Seriously

If you’re a fan of KFC’s Mac and Cheese, or just looking to order a whole bunch for a family dinner, you should know that it’s possible to get KFC Mac and Cheese buckets.

@itsallenferrell

Reply to @akwardweebperson WHATS NEXT ? ##fyp ##foryou

♬ Classical Music – Classical Music

This was confirmed by TikToker Allen Ferrell, known for submitting ridiculous orders in drive-thrus and seeing if he can get away with it. One of his fans challenged him to order an entire bucket of KFC’s cheesy pasta, and staffers at the location he went to obliged.

Imagery courtesy of Allen Ferrell

A typical KFC bucket can hold up to 16 pieces of fried chicken, which translates to a hefty quantity of macaroni and cheese that can fit inside.

Ferrell ended up paying $19.99 for the bucket, which came out to about $21 after taxes. He later mentioned that he ate the whole bucket, which, to be honest, I don’t blame him for.

A “Bucket-Size” offering isn’t on KFC’s official menu for online ordering, but apparently there is a system in place to charge someone for it if they do get some.

Foodbeast has reached out to KFC to see if this is something that can be ordered commonly, and are waiting to hear back.

At the very least, it’s possible to order while going through the drive-thru.