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Brand Recipes Video

This Tuna Hash California Burrito Is an Ode to a San Diego Favorite

As far as quintessential Californian menu items go, few items have a claim as strong as the eponymous California burrito.

When visiting Southern California for the first time, it’s a requirement, not an option, to try a California burrito. Crispy fries, tender meat, with a gooey mix of cheese, salsa, sour cream, and guacamole, all wrapped in a massive flour tortilla— where could that even start to go wrong?

When a friend of mine, who is a recently minted Californian by way of Chicago, heard about the dish he was (almost) as excited as he was the first time he drove down a street lined by the state’s iconic palm trees. It’s that big of a deal.

The penultimate midnight meal, it’s a regional mishmash that could’ve only come to existence in San Diego, a city that lies only miles north of the Mexico-US border. For our newest recipe in collaboration with Bumble Bee® Seafoods, we looked to the city known for its roadside drive-thru’s that pump out tacos and burritos around the clock.

Meet the California Tuna Hash Burrito. Read on to see how to make this.

Before you get going, warm up some frozen crinkle cut French fries in your preferred fashion. Personally, I’d go with the oven, or an air fryer if that’s among the options.

The actual cooking element of this recipe only requires a couple ingredients: one 2.5 oz pouch of Bumble Bee® Jalapeño Seasoned Tuna, a small bell pepper, a small yellow onion, a ¼ cup Salsa Ranchera (which should be available canned at any local Hispanic grocery store), and 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil.

Throw a pan on medium-high heat, then add the vegetable oil, and dice the veggies. Once the pan is properly warmed up (a well-known test to check for this: sprinkle some water over it, if that sizzles then it’s ready), toss in the veggies. Sweat those down until they’re nicely browned, which should take around ten minutes. Add the tuna and salsa ranchero, and let that go for a couple minutes, which should reduce the salsa a bit. After that, it’s assemblage time.

Lay a tortilla flat on your counter, and place around four ounces of fries on it. Drizzle a ¼ cup each of: sour cream, guacamole, and salsa fresca. Top this ¾ – 1 cup of tuna hash, and a generous handful of grated shredded cheese.

Then, just fold in the sides and roll up the burrito.

Boom. We’re done here. All that’s left to do is to dive into the masterpiece that is the California burrito– and maybe make another one.

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#foodbeast Cravings Culture FOODBEAST Restaurants Video

The LA Spot Where You Can Grill Your Own Filipino Street Food Favorites

There’s something to be said when you catch a vibe from cooking your own food in a setting that’s normally not in your own kitchen. You can find that simple pleasure when barbecuing, campfire cooking, and even sitting down to a Korean bbq meal. But a spot in Los Angeles’ Historic Filipinotown called Dollar Hits is adding its name to that list, by channeling the energy of Filipino street food and letting diners cook it themselves on grills out doors.

Step inside and you’re greeted with a wide array of Filipino street food options. Imagine heaping stacks of meat skewers ranging from traditional pork and chicken barbecue, to other favorites like fish balls, pork and chicken intestines (isaw), chicken feet (adidas), chicken head (helmet), pig ears (walkman), chicken hearts, quail egg (kwek kwek), and more.

After picking your lot to grill, simply step outside to three outdoor grills and cook your choices to taste. As far as dining experiences go in LA, Dollar Hits is quite memorable as there’s not many like it in the city.

With outdoor dining being the norm these days, Dollar Hits should serve as a great choice to add to one’s list of spots to safely eat out at, all while catching the whole Filipino street food vibe that many have yet to experience.

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Food Policy Opinion Video

NYU’s Quarantine Meal Debacle Is A Wake-Up Call For Colleges Everywhere

As students have been returning to college to start the new school year, some have had to quarantine to prevent the spread of COVID-19. At New York University, students that quarantined in the dorms got meals, but their quality was so poor that videos of them went viral all over TikTok.

@benbenfuntime

I can’t make this up ##nyu ##vegan ##quarantine ##fyp

♬ Kouen – Lo-Fi Beats

For the first few days, the NYU quarantine meals program was a mess. Vegans and vegetarians received animal and dairy products, some students had missing meals, others didn’t get them delivered until late in the day… it was chaotic, to say the least.

@cheezitbabey

we literally had to drink our own pee last night ##NYU ##nyumeal ##nyutok ##quarantine ##college ##helpus ##fyp ##survivaltok

♬ original sound – cheezitbabey

After making it onto the news for their low-quality meals, NYU apologized, and pledged to do better. For the most part, they’ve lived up to that, as they’ve added more employees to help prepare and send out meals, and even sent out cases of water and snack boxes to help students get adequate nutrition.

@rico_da_fool

Chicken caesar salad but the chicken caesar salad is silent😌😌😌##nyutiktok ##nyu ##fyp ##expensive ##flex

♬ original sound – drydoodooflakes

It didn’t resolve all of the issues, however, so NYU eventually gave students $30 of delivery credit per day as a way to get dinner for the remainder of the quarantine period. They continued to serve breakfast and lunch throughout that time frame.

Considering that NYU students pay over $38,000 per semester for tuition, housing, and other expenses, the quality of the meals they were getting is shocking. It’s also bringing the value of expensive college fees into question, especially during a pandemic.

If expensive schools are serving low-quality meals, limited access to amenities paid for through tuition costs, and transitioning to online learning, then what are students really paying for? A place to stay to take online classes?

The cost of an online course is about $1,200-$1,300, and monthly, one would spent about $350 in food and $1,000 in rent per person in a 2-bedroom apartment. This means that one could go take 4 online classes at home, in a semester-long timeline, and pay under $10,000 to do so.

It’s understandable that the pandemic has changed how everything operates, including college. Given how much money students are paying schools, however, NYU should serve as a case study of what not to do to ensure student nutrition during a pandemic.

To learn more about the full debacle, check out the entire Foodbeast video on the NYU quarantine meals at the top of this story.

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Fast Food Video

KFC’s Mac And Cheese Can Be Ordered By The Bucket, Seriously

If you’re a fan of KFC’s Mac and Cheese, or just looking to order a whole bunch for a family dinner, you should know that it’s possible to get KFC Mac and Cheese buckets.

@itsallenferrell

Reply to @akwardweebperson WHATS NEXT ? ##fyp ##foryou

♬ Classical Music – Classical Music

This was confirmed by TikToker Allen Ferrell, known for submitting ridiculous orders in drive-thrus and seeing if he can get away with it. One of his fans challenged him to order an entire bucket of KFC’s cheesy pasta, and staffers at the location he went to obliged.

Imagery courtesy of Allen Ferrell

A typical KFC bucket can hold up to 16 pieces of fried chicken, which translates to a hefty quantity of macaroni and cheese that can fit inside.

Ferrell ended up paying $19.99 for the bucket, which came out to about $21 after taxes. He later mentioned that he ate the whole bucket, which, to be honest, I don’t blame him for.

A “Bucket-Size” offering isn’t on KFC’s official menu for online ordering, but apparently there is a system in place to charge someone for it if they do get some.

Foodbeast has reached out to KFC to see if this is something that can be ordered commonly, and are waiting to hear back.

At the very least, it’s possible to order while going through the drive-thru.

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Celebrity Grub Video

Gordon Ramsay’s ‘Ultimate Grilled Cheese’ Gets Roasted Amidst Mythical Kitchen Feud

Gordon Ramsay has been recently taking dishes that folks make on TikTok and criticizing them for various reasons.

Some of the submissions were parodies meant to get Chef Ramsay riled up. However, his criticism of a Ramen Grilled Cheese from Rhett and Link’s Mythical Kitchen drew clapbacks from the show’s own chef, Josh Scherer.

@gordonramsayofficial

I’d like to ram this in the trash !! ##duet with @mythicalkitchen ##ThisIsBliss ##ramsayreacts ##fyp ##ramen

♬ original sound – mythicalkitchen

Ramsay had multiple critiques that Scherer called into question on Twitter, including the fact that Josh toasted both sides of the bread and used a “plastic cheese.”

Scherer went even further and called Chef Ramsay out on his own recent iteration of a Grilled Cheese that the Michelin-starred chef described as “ultimate” in a YouTube video.

In this video, Ramsay makes a grilled cheese in a fireplace using kimchi, pepper berry-infused Romano, and Asiago cheeses. The thickness of the cheese plus the short cooking time on a high heat led to Ramsay’s grilled cheese sandwich not even being melted, as Scherer quickly pointed out.

The Mythical Kitchen host wasn’t the only one to call out Ramsay on his cold grilled cheese, as comments on the YouTube video showed the cooking TV veteran no mercy.

“I think Gordon just made that “Idiot Sandwich” he once mentioned in Hell’s Kitchen,” one comment read. Another said, “I logged in just to say that looks like the absolute worst grilled cheese I have ever seen.”

Many comments along the same lines are flooding the video, and Scherer’s own takedown has led to a spillover of the same on Twitter.

So far, responses have been relatively tame, although someone Scherer described as a “Ramsay stan” attacked his cooking directly:

Chef Ramsay has yet to issue a response on either his grilled cheese or his critique of Scherer’s dish, but being overcritical is pretty on-brand for a chef known for the barrage of insults he can throw at you in mere seconds.

As this beef between Scherer and Ramsay continues to develop, it may take nothing less than a Foodbeast Kitchen League match to quash the disagreements between the two. Grilled Cheese battle, anyone?

Featured image photos courtesy of Josh Scherer and Shutterstock.

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#foodbeast Cravings Features Food Trends Food Trucks FOODBEAST Now Trending Video What's New

Las Vegas Food Truck Serving Up BIRRIA-STUFFED Tamales

Birria has been booming in the food scene outside of those in the know recently. For those that have been up on it, they’ll probably tell you, “What took y’all so long?”

And I get it, birria, from its origins in Jalisco, Mexico to the widespread appeal it enjoys today, is something that shouldn’t be treated as some new trend. Proponents (which I assume would be pretty much anyone that’s had it because it’s f*cking delicious) will extoll the virtues of its savory allure all day, all the while pointing you in every direction to where you can enjoy it in different iterations and contemporary takes. This then can take you into a fantastic journey that will have you feasting through creative takes like birria ramen and birria pizza.

However, keep going further in that journey and you might find yourself in Las Vegas, Nevada, just like I did, where birria takes on the form of tamales. Yes, the concept of birria has now found a home inside a warm tamal, with melty cheese as its roommate, all courtesy of El Tamalucas, the city’s first tamale food truck.

Since opening El Tamalucas in 2014, owner Saul Talavera has innovated his recipes and expanded the repertoire of his takes on the iconic dish, which include unique selections like chicken alfredo tamales and Flamin’ Hot Cheetos tamales. His next hit is the BirriQueso Tamale Dunkers, which I described earlier, and is a holy trinity of birria, consomé, and cheese. My mouth just watered typing out that sentence and now I’m fighting the urge to buy a plane ticket to Las Vegas. That’s because these tamales were one of the best things I’d eaten this year and the memories of having it look like a rush of the rich, bold consomé-soaked, cheese and birria-stuffed tamale cascading down my greedy gullet.

If you’re trying to catch a glorious fever dream off one bite, absolutely look up El Tamalucas when you’re out making questionable decisions in Las Vegas.

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Recipes Video

Someone Turned Popular Cheesy ‘Knafeh’ Dessert Into A Pop-Tart

It was only last year when I first discovered the magic of knafeh, the popular Middle Eastern dessert that’s made with rose water, honey, pistachios, cheese, and rice noodles.

In this latest Foodbeast Recipe Challenge, our team was tasked to create a mouthwatering recipe with cheese as the main ingredient.

Foodbeast’s Elie went for it, recreating the iconic Middle Eastern dish with a Pilsbury Twist: he turned it into a Pop Tart.

Check out the video above to see exactly how Elie pulled it off. This week’s challengers also include Adam, Kimberly, Oscar, Costa, and Devin.

As someone who has experienced lactose intolerance for most of his adult life, it breaks my heart not to be able to try any of these recipes. Still, the smiles they’ll bring to others will… nope, still bitter I can’t try them.

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Twitch Video

Man Makes Nashville Hot Chicken Blindfolded With Some Scorching Results

 

Making your own fried chicken at home is one of the most comforting meals you can produce. But can we make it Nashville Hot style while blindfolded?

Foodbeast Chris attempted the hard-mode cooking challenge as part of a Kitchen League mini game. Kitchen League is Foodbeast’s monthly competitive cooking show on Twitch where the audience gets to sabotage the chefs live.

When competitions aren’t streaming, members of the Foodbeast team will hop on and cook while plagued with various sabotages like time crunches, cooking while blindfolded, and other obstacles. It’s a chance to practice these sabotages that chefs will face throughout the competition, going through them one at a time to understand where problems can occur.

Chris is actually one of the judges on Kitchen League, so going in on Kitchen League Minigames like this helps him understand what the chefs go through during their cooking time.

Chris did have fellow Foodbeast Elie acting as a guide over video chat to make sure he didn’t burn or injure himself, but getting everything else done correctly was up to Chris.

This included loading up the fried chicken into the deep fryer…

Coating it in the Nashville hot oil…

… and even seasoning it while relying on kitchen awareness and Elie’s instructions.

While there were some struggles with holding the chicken after it was fried, as well as attempting to coat the chicken with oil and seasoning, Chris emerged unscathed,  with a triumphant platter of glistening, fiery Nashville Hot Chicken in hand. He managed to complete the challenge in just under 2 hours, a remarkable feat while not having any sight to work with.

The hardest part of it to Chris, outside of cutting chicken and dropping into scalding hot oil, was trying to not get any of the fiery spice caught in his throat while trying to cook. As he found out tasting it at the end, the chicken’s heat catches up with you fast.

You can view parts of the challenge through the clips posted throughout this post, and the full stream is available on Foodbeast’s Twitch page. The next challenge, on Thursday, May 14th at 2 PM PST, will be Foodbeast Costa (that’s me) attempting to make sushi one-handed, so stay tuned to see how that turns out.