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Twitch Video

Man Makes Nashville Hot Chicken Blindfolded With Some Scorching Results

 

Making your own fried chicken at home is one of the most comforting meals you can produce. But can we make it Nashville Hot style while blindfolded?

Foodbeast Chris attempted the hard-mode cooking challenge as part of a Kitchen League mini game. Kitchen League is Foodbeast’s monthly competitive cooking show on Twitch where the audience gets to sabotage the chefs live.

When competitions aren’t streaming, members of the Foodbeast team will hop on and cook while plagued with various sabotages like time crunches, cooking while blindfolded, and other obstacles. It’s a chance to practice these sabotages that chefs will face throughout the competition, going through them one at a time to understand where problems can occur.

Chris is actually one of the judges on Kitchen League, so going in on Kitchen League Minigames like this helps him understand what the chefs go through during their cooking time.

Chris did have fellow Foodbeast Elie acting as a guide over video chat to make sure he didn’t burn or injure himself, but getting everything else done correctly was up to Chris.

This included loading up the fried chicken into the deep fryer…

Coating it in the Nashville hot oil…

… and even seasoning it while relying on kitchen awareness and Elie’s instructions.

While there were some struggles with holding the chicken after it was fried, as well as attempting to coat the chicken with oil and seasoning, Chris emerged unscathed,  with a triumphant platter of glistening, fiery Nashville Hot Chicken in hand. He managed to complete the challenge in just under 2 hours, a remarkable feat while not having any sight to work with.

The hardest part of it to Chris, outside of cutting chicken and dropping into scalding hot oil, was trying to not get any of the fiery spice caught in his throat while trying to cook. As he found out tasting it at the end, the chicken’s heat catches up with you fast.

You can view parts of the challenge through the clips posted throughout this post, and the full stream is available on Foodbeast’s Twitch page. The next challenge, on Thursday, May 14th at 2 PM PST, will be Foodbeast Costa (that’s me) attempting to make sushi one-handed, so stay tuned to see how that turns out.

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Twitch

Chefs Nationwide Compete In Unprecedented Remote Cooking Tournament

Foodbeast Twitch will be hosting what might be the first-ever nationwide competitive cooking competition that viewers can control the outcome LIVE and in realtime. During this Bleed Purple tournament, each chef will be teamed up with a partner that will help them develop their recipes for the upcoming matchups.

Imagine a competitive cooking competition where any chef can compete from their home kitchens. With everyone staying in these days, getting our sports fix is limited to highlight reels or video games. What if, however, there was a real-time tournament where not only you can cheer on your favorite chef, but you can actively sabotage their competition live?!

For those unfamiliar with the Foodbeast Kitchen League, it’s a competitive cooking series on Foodbeast’s Twitch channel that pits two chefs against one another. While they cook, audience members can donate Twitch currency “BITS” to sabotage competing chefs with things like having to cook one-handed, being blindfolded, taking away their knife, or having to wear oven mitts for a period of time. Regardless of how many sabotages come their way, the chefs always manage to produce some of the coolest dishes we’ve seen and tasted.

There will be ways to support your favorite chefs during the stream too, with options such as sabotage protection, clearing sabotages, and revealing dreaded secret ingredients early in the competition.

As the chefs cook, their partners are tasked with guiding them through their sabotages as well as answering host questions to earn Swagger points that lend to the judges’ final deliberation.

For the first time, Kitchen League will be done in complete Squad Stream format, with chefs and their partners participating remotely across the country.

The winner of the entire tournament will be presented the Foodbeast Kitchen League Championship Belt on stream. Additionally, there will be a charity-based reward for all four teams, with bits contributed by your audience (to sabotage opposing teams) going to restaurants or charitable organizations that your team chooses. The overall winner will have $500 added to that cumulative total.

 

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Competitors for the Bleed Purple tournament include:

We’re pumped to see how this all plays out. You can learn more on our Foodbeast Kitchen League site and be sure to tune in 2pm-5pm next Monday, April 27, on Twitch.TV/Foodbeast for the first competition. The second round continues 2pm-5pm Tuesday, April 28, with the final round to determine the champion concludes 2pm-5pm Thursday April 30.

Categories
Recipes Twitch

If You Have These Ingredients In Your Cupboard, Come Stress Bake With Us LIVE

Watch live video from foodbeast on www.twitch.tv

Like a lot of other places, the Foodbeast team has all been working remotely throughout the “shelter in place” orders that have been set. That hasn’t stopped us from creating the food content we love, especially in our “Foodbeast Kitchen” series on Twitch.

Foodbeast Kitchen League judge, Chris Abouabdo, has decided to jump on this week for a “Stress Baking” edition that will see fresh bread, biscuits, and more get made live — and we’d love to extend the offer for anyone to come cook and hang with us.

The main focus of the stress baking will be on some biscuit creations. Chris has come up with some Breakfast Biscuit Boats, as well as the recipe for a sweet Oreo Biscuit Bread Pudding that are both simple yet scrumptious. He’ll also be embarking on a longer project to make some fresh bread, a process that requires an overnight slow fermentation.

Below, you can find all of the ingredients Chris will be using throughout this week to make his bread dough, biscuit recipes, and some home fermentation projects he’ll be starting. Those include a hot sauce, French fries we’ll make from fermented potatoes, and a fruity blueberry base for a potential future barbecue sauce.

Check in on our streams on March 26th (at 2 PM PST) and 27th (at 12 PM PST) on Twitch to see these come to life! As part of the stream, we’ll also be looking at the pantries and fridges of anyone who wants to let us know what they have, and help come up with some dope recipes you guys can make. To chat with us, make sure to head to the Twitch stream and click the “Follow” button.

For those that want to follow along with the stream, we’ll be placing the ingredients list below so you’ll have it on hand. Once the stream is over, we’ll also be posting highlights within this piece that show the process of the biscuits and the bread!

Throughout the coming weeks, we’ll also be keeping track of those home fermentations as we keep streaming food recipes and our competition series, the Foodbeast Kitchen League. Make sure to stay tuned to see when those events are happening!

For now, though, if you want to jump in on the stress baking with us, the full ingredient lists are below:

Bread

  • Bread Flour
  • Wheat Flour
  • Yeast
  • Salt

Biscuits

  • Flour
  • Baking Powder
  • Baking Soda
  • Sugar
  • Salt
  • Butter
  • Buttermilk

Biscuit Boats

  • Frozen hash browns
  • Eggs
  • Bacon
  • Cheese

Oreo Biscuit Bread Pudding

  • Oreos
  • Milk
  • Butter
  • Eggs
  • Vanilla Extract

Fermenting Shopping List

  • Tomatillos
  • Habaneros
  • Onion
  • Cilantro
  • Potatoes
  • Blueberries
Categories
Science Twitch Video

Debunking 9 Of The Internet’s Most Viral Egg Experiments

Some of the most viral videos on the internet come from fun food “science experiments,” most of which are fun ways to transform or think about the things we eat. Eggs tend to be an especially popular category, especially with the myriad of seemingly mystical alterations they can go through.

However, as is always the case with the internet, things may not always be what they seem, especially when put through the lens of a jump-cut video. To prove whether some of the most viral egg experiments were actually true or not, we decided to test them out ourselves. The entire process took over 24 hours, all of which we conducted live on our Twitch channel so that folks could see how it all played out.

Below are the results of the nine experiments we attempted to prove as true or false. You can also view the shortened YouTube version of how we conducted these tests above.

Vinegar Egg Experiment

We took a few different eggs, added them to a beaker of distilled white vinegar, and let them sit for about 30 hours at room temperature. Marinating raw eggs like this for over a day is supposed to eat away at the egg shell and solidify the egg white, leaving you with a bouncy egg.

While our shells didn’t completely eat away, the eggs were slightly bouncy, but couldn’t survive a fall of more than a foot. Since it didn’t work as the internet led us to believe on both parts, we marked this test as failed.

Neon Vinegar Egg Experiment

By adding highlighter to the above vinegar solution, you can effectively dye the dissolved egg, leaving it a neon-like hue. Apparently, this may also glow under black lights, but we didn’t have one available to test it out. As for the dying, though, this one succeeded.

Dissolving Eggshell Experiment

If you take just the egg shell and remove all of the insides, you can also dissolve it in vinegar. What you should be left with is a thin membrane enclosed, almost like a small bouncy ball. After 30 hours, almost all of the egg shell had dissolved, but not quite. Had we given it an extra 12, this would have worked the way we wanted, so we said this experiment was a success.

Silver Egg Experiment

This experiment relies more on optical illusions, it seems, but by charring an egg shell completely then setting it in water, you’re left with a silver hue on the outside. This one was tough, but managed to work out for us, making it a success.

Blooming Egg Salad Experiment

Although it’s more of a hack than an experiment, we were curious to see how pressure played a role in this test. By pushing an egg through something thin yet tough, like a mesh, you can effectively dice it into thin pieces. While this was a success for us, you do have a little bit of a mess at the end from any bits that get smushed against the mesh.

Egg Shaping Experiment

When eggs are cooling after being hard boiled, the shape of the white can apparently be changed by adding the right amount of pressure. We were able to use this to make eggs in the shape of diamonds and cylinders, so this egg “science” was a resounding success.

Egg Bottleneck Experiment

Apparently, cooling hard-boiled egg whites can act like a more viscous solid that allows it to move and transform its shape. In this case, we were able to use steam from boiling hot water to create a vacuum, pulling the egg through a hole smaller than itself and trapping it inside a carafe. It did take a few minutes (a lot longer than what some videos would have you believe), but it was a success nonetheless.

Blow Peeling Experiment

In some viral experiments, we saw people “peel” hard boiled eggs by breaking off the top and bottom pieces of shell, then blowing through one end to force it out. Yes, this was ridiculous as it sounded, and even the strongest of gusts we could muster couldn’t get the egg to budge. For us, this was a fail.

Golden Egg Experiment

Shaking an egg long and hard enough can, some claim, mix together the yolk and the white so that when you boil it, the resulting egg is yellow all the way through. After several minutes of vigorous movement, the yolk simply would not mix, no matter what we did. This was a disappointing fail.


Overall, 6 of the 9 experiments we tried did end up succeeding, proving that while most of what’s out there does work, as always, take what you see on the internet with a grain of salt.

Categories
Celebrity Grub Twitch

Trader Joe’s Favorites Are The Theme Of Foodbeast’s Next LIVE Cooking Battle

We’ve all got our favorite items at Trader Joe’s, whether it be the legendary Orange Chicken, the hype new Knafeh released this year, or even some holiday Jingle Jangle. Some of those favorites are about to be stretched to their creative limits in an upcoming intense cooking battle.

On this week’s upcoming matchup of the Foodbeast Kitchen League, two of Twitch’s top chefs will be squaring off in a Trader Joe’s Battle. Returning champion CookingForNoobs, who unseated chef Josh Elkin last time around, is going up against newcomer Jae_Benny, a Twitch chef and gamer with a serious lineup of unique recipes up her sleeve.

For those unfamiliar with the Kitchen League, in each matchup, the audience has the ability to sabotage the chefs live by taking away knives, eyesight, or other things they need to cook their dish. They also have a key voice in the vote, grading each chef on their dish’s visual appeal as well as the chef’s swagger throughout the match.

The two chefs are making recipes that are based either on their favorite Trader Joe’s items, or using their Trader Joe’s items. What that will actually entail remains to be seen, but it should make for an intense and tasty matchup.

CookingForNoobs and Jae_Benny will square off on Foodbeast’s Twitch channel, live at 11 AM PST on Thursday, December 12th.

Categories
FOODBEAST Restaurants Twitch

Two Of Instagram’s Hottest Chefs Are Duking It Out In A Fried Chicken Battle

Two of the most viral foods you can find on the internet these days are a 20 pound ramen challenge and a “Magical Burger” that is decorated with colorful marshmallows and sprinkles. The culinary masterminds behind these two dishes are squaring off for the first time in one of the more unique cooking battle formats out there.

On September 26th, chef Michael Pham of Shomi Noods and Hotties Fried Chicken will take on chef Fernando Valladeras of Groundhouse Burger and Fowl Play OC in the Foodbeast Kitchen League. The two will pit their fried chicken recipes against each other, competing to see whose poultry is prime.

In the Foodbeast Kitchen League, chefs each have 45 minutes to compete against each other, and the entire battle is streamed live on Twitch. While the battle is going, viewers directly interact with the chefs via sabotages. Various amounts of Twitch bit donations can take away valuable assets like knives, hands, and even sight for a short period of time.

Twitch viewers will also heavily influence which of the two chefs wins the battle, as they get to vote on the chefs’ visual presentation and swagger throughout the course of the stream.

To tune into the stream, you can check out the Foodbeast Twitch channel at 11 am PST on the 26th.

Categories
Fast Food Twitch

Competitive Eating Legend Molly Schuyler Eats 100×100 In-N-Out Burger In One Sitting


Not too long ago, we hosted an In-N-Out 50×50 challenge in the hallowed grounds of Foodbeast HQ. Competitive eaters such as Nader Reda and Raina Huang each attempted to best the burger, with Raina completing the challenge in less than 40 minutes.

Now, another combatant has thrown her hat into the ring.

Famed competitive eater Molly Schuyler has stepped up to take on not just the In-N-Out 50×50, but requested we make it a 100×100 challenge.

The $154.84 bill yielded a monolith of meat, taking nearly half an hour for the restaurant to build and nearly half a dozen boxes to transport it back to Foodbeast HQ.

While Schuyler was apprehensive whether she could defeat such a comically large burger, she dove into it once the clock started and didn’t stop until that last piece of lettuce and bun was tucked away in her stomach.

Check out exactly how it went down on our Twitch Channel, or the YouTube embed above.

You can also catch Molly at our upcoming food and music festival Nood Beach this Sunday, September 1st. Tickets are still on sale at Nood-Beach.com, or you can catch her try to tackle a 20-pound bowl of ramen live on Twitch.

Categories
Twitch Video What's New

You Can Control This Live Competitive Cooking Series From Home

I’ve often found myself shouting at the screen when watching a competitive cooking show, hoping that by sheer force of will the contestant will heed my advice. Futile, yes, but a practice I’ve been unable to shake for the better part of a decade. For anyone and everyone who have felt that frustration, there’s a new competitive cooking series that will quell that rage.

Foodbeast is introducing it’s all new Kitchen League, a live-cooking competition that airs exclusively on Foodbeast Twitch.

Watch FOODBEAST KITCHEN LEAGUE: INSTANT RAMEN w/ @BookofElie and @Outhereflourishing from foodbeast on www.twitch.tv

Here’s how it works:

Two chefs will be given a theme each week that they will have to base their dishes up0n. They will then have 30 minutes to cook a winning dish. During that time, however, Twitch viewers will have the chance to donate BITS to throw a wrench in their segment. For example, for 150 bits, the chef would not be allowed to use a knife for a minute. For 1,000 bits, the chef has to turn off the heat on their stove for a minute. So you can imagine the hijinks that will ensue once those and other sabotage from BIT donations come into play.

Once the time limit is reached, chefs will be judged by a guest host as well as the Twitch audience.

During our live Beta Test, Foodbeast Elie Ayrouth went up against Constantine Spyrou, and the two had to come up with a creative dish based on an instant noodle theme. You can check out how it all went down in the video above.

This Thursday will kick off the inaugural Foodbeast Kitchen League and feature Chef Saengthong Douangdara go up against professional eater and entertainer Raina Huang. The theme: Spicy.

Check out the livestream this Thursday Aug. 8 at 11am PST at Twitch.tv/FOODBEAST. There will also be Foodbeast Kitchen League streams every Thursday during the month of August leading up to Foodbeast’s Nood Beach, taking place on Sunday Sept. 1.

Featured Image Courtesy of Evan Lancaster and OEDesign